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Discussion Starter #21
Found it in the user manual 馃檮 It's 124 links, and a DID 525 HV3. Looks like DID have discontinued that range so I have asked them what the current equivalent is. On all the websites selling chains it doesn;t seem to say that you get a master link with the new chain. Do I have to buy one of these separately?
Mike
 

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Yes - it's the original chain fitted by Honda. I have now cleaned all around the front sprocket which in the picture looks very rusty. But in fact the sprocket face is in excellent condition and was covered in rust dust which presumably is coming from that washer. The sliders you are talking about are presumably fastened to the top and underside of the swingarm.
Mike
If your chain and sprockets are original, at 24,000 miles I'd replace them all - especially if you plan to keep the bike for another 24K miles. Wear may not be obvious until compared to a new sprockets as wear is not symmetrical - inside of sprockets seems to wear more - even with proper chain alignment.

I used Honda OEM sprockets and DID 525VX chain. Unless you can buy the correct link chain (?124 links?) you usually buy 130 link chain and GRIND then push out the pins to shorten the chain to proper length. You will need a break / rivet tool - Motion Pro make some good ones Chain Breaker, Press and Riveting Tool - Motion Pro

The rust dust is coming from the splines. As a minimum, you need to pull the front sprocket and put Moly PASTE (70% Moly) on the splines. Honda brand is good, no brand is cheap. If you wear the splines excessively the shaft can only be replaced by splitting the cases.

You are correct on the sliders. There is a triangle on the upper one - manual says to replace when worn down to tip of triangle.

Quick way to check chain alignment is to clamp a 2-foot level onto the rear sprocket and sight down the chain.

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Found it in the user manual 馃檮 It's 124 links, and a DID 525 HV3. Looks like DID have discontinued that range so I have asked them what the current equivalent is. On all the websites selling chains it doesn;t seem to say that you get a master link with the new chain. Do I have to buy one of these separately?
Mike
You should get a master link with the chain.

While you are mucking with the rear wheel -- good idea to also check wheel bearings and seals.
Rear disk side has many reported failures ~24K miles. Mine was done at 24K km. Water ingress.
Use your finger to rotate the inner race - you will easily be able to feel if it is rough.

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks - I will check all those things, but I'm only at 18 months and 18k miles. Still under warranty - should the splines and wheel bearings be covered?
Mike
 

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Thanks - I will check all those things, but I'm only at 18 months and 18k miles. Still under warranty - should the splines and wheel bearings be covered?
Mike
My bad. I misread your original post - thought you were at 24K miles not 18K miles. :eek:
You should be able to get 24K miles from your chain and sprockets. I was guilty of a few multiple day rides without lubing the chain, hence the o-rings were worn, splitting and getting spit out. Otherwise my sprockets weren't too bad and the chain not stretched.

Depends on the dealer - spline lube and wheel bearings Honda should cover - unless they consider them 'wear items'.
Always good to ask.
 

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I'd be very surprised if bearings were covered at nigh on 3 yrs old and 18k miles.
Mike, I bought a Clarke riveting kit and the chain and sprockets (my sprockets looked OK but without a brand new set to sit them next to, how am I to know in reality...so for the sake of about 拢40...) I simply used a small file to file off the rivets on a link on the OE chain and removed it. Start to finish must have taken all of 30 minutes. Easy job.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I'd be very surprised if bearings were covered at nigh on 3 yrs old and 18k miles.
Mike, I bought a Clarke riveting kit and the chain and sprockets (my sprockets looked OK but without a brand new set to sit them next to, how am I to know in reality...so for the sake of about 拢40...) I simply used a small file to file off the rivets on a link on the OE chain and removed it. Start to finish must have taken all of 30 minutes. Easy job.
Thanks Dave, I think I will give it a go. But my bike is only 18 months old so I would hope the bearings would be covered if they are shot. Do you need a special too to replace the bearings? Coincidentally I was wondering just today if I could file the rivet heads off because I haven't got a grinder.
Mike
 

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I replaced the wheel bearings F and R on my Bandit a few years ago. I had no special tools, I simply drifted them out and used what I had to put the new ones in...a large Socket the size of the bearing. I was quite happy the bearings on the AT were still OK so didn't change them. I'll keep an eye on them and swap as when required....
I expected it to be a swine to file off the rivet heads but I'd say it took less than a minute. Very straightforward.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
If your chain and sprockets are original, at 24,000 miles I'd replace them all - especially if you plan to keep the bike for another 24K miles. Wear may not be obvious until compared to a new sprockets as wear is not symmetrical - inside of sprockets seems to wear more - even with proper chain alignment.

I used Honda OEM sprockets and DID 525VX chain. Unless you can buy the correct link chain (?124 links?) you usually buy 130 link chain and GRIND then push out the pins to shorten the chain to proper length. You will need a break / rivet tool - Motion Pro make some good ones Chain Breaker, Press and Riveting Tool - Motion Pro

The rust dust is coming from the splines. As a minimum, you need to pull the front sprocket and put Moly PASTE (70% Moly) on the splines. Honda brand is good, no brand is cheap. If you wear the splines excessively the shaft can only be replaced by splitting the cases.

You are correct on the sliders. There is a triangle on the upper one - manual says to replace when worn down to tip of triangle.

Quick way to check chain alignment is to clamp a 2-foot level onto the rear sprocket and sight down the chain.

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Thanks for a very comprehensive post Black99s, I think I'm going to try all of this myself. A mate has a chain break and riveting tool, and I can get a DID chain for 拢64 (reduced from 拢85)
I have some Honda Moly 60 paste that is now discontinued but says 'Recommended for gears, bearings and other high-pressure, high temperature applications' so I think it will do for the splines. I will order a genuine honda front sprocket, but do I need a special tool to get the old one off and press the new one into position? And remind me, to drop the back wheel out do I just unbolt the calliper and hang it up high, and unbolt the parking brake and move that out of the way too?
Thanks
Mike
 

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Thanks Dave, I think I will give it a go. But my bike is only 18 months old so I would hope the bearings would be covered if they are shot. Do you need a special too to replace the bearings? ... ...
Mike
You can heat the hub and drift bearings out from the opposite side. I used a Motion Pro blind bearing puller from the shop I work at. Heat the hub when removing bearings. Heat the hub and cool the bearing when installing.
If you change bearings change seals too - note the seal seating depth from the shop manual.

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... ... And remind me, to drop the back wheel out do I just unbolt the calliper and hang it up high, and unbolt the parking brake and move that out of the way too? Thanks
Mike
My bike's standard not DCT. Can't comment on the park brake.
I just pull the axle and slide / lift the whole caliber assembly out of the way whilst removing the rear wheel, then put the caliber assembly back on the swing arm while I work on tyres or whatever needed the rear wheel removed.

Take Pictures before / as you take things apart for reference.

Caution - the manual is wrong on rear axle spacer positions.
Tophat spacer goes chain side. Cylindrical spacer disk side.
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Discussion Starter #36
The torque value is 54 N-m, or 40 lb-ft. So just loosen it before you cut the chain.
Good point - I probably would have forgotten to do that .... but as Maxply says, I thought you might need a puller of some kind to get it off the splines especially if there's rust? By the way, does DCT make any difference - can't put it in gear while engine is off, but could put a wooden baton through the wheel I guess.
Mike
 

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To torque/untorque the front sprocket, stand on the right side of the bike with your foot on the rear brake while leaning over the seat and working the wrench (with the chain on).

The sprocket pulls off and on well within finger strength. After removing the bolt (14mm??).
 

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Discussion Starter #38
To torque/untorque the front sprocket, stand on the right side of the bike with your foot on the rear brake while leaning over the seat and working the wrench (with the chain on).

The sprocket pulls off and on well within finger strength. After removing the bolt (14mm??).
Thanks - good idea.
By the way - anyone know of any disadvantages of using a JT sprocket as it's about 1/3 of the price of the Honda OEM front sprocket?
Mike
 

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The Honda front sprocket has a rubber shoulder to smooth out vibrations/harmonics and is said to quiet noise some. Also claimed longer chain life.
I can鈥檛 speak to any of these claims but, I dropped the extra coin on a Honda front sprocket and a less expensive Superlite rear sprocket and a Honda chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
The Honda front sprocket has a rubber shoulder to smooth out vibrations/harmonics and is said to quiet noise some. Also claimed longer chain life.
I can鈥檛 speak to any of these claims but, I dropped the extra coin on a Honda front sprocket and a less expensive Superlite rear sprocket and a Honda chain.
Ah yes I remember reading about that rubber now. Honda sprocket it is then
Mike
 
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