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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,
I just came back from an epic tour to the to the top of Europe and back mainly off road.
I had a pretty bad drop into muddy water during this trip that stopped me for a day to fix. Completely hydrolocked.

Water Plant Automotive tire Motor vehicle Natural landscape


It was actually worse than what you swee here. I tried to get around this puddle on the left and lost my footing as I put my right foot down which slid right into the puddle, so when the bike went in, it was wheels up on the left bank here. Ouch
The bike stood in this puddle for about 15min while I wrestled it out. Very soft and sticky mud bottom.

The question I have is regarding the componentry on the righ side of the handlebars. Everyhting has this clay mud in it. The on off switch, ignition switch, etc.
I am thinking it best to take these parts off and clean them properly.

Shop manual is kind of light on this part of the bike (as far as my search )

Anyone been in this part of the bike before.
Any tips or tricks?
 

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Wow what an event!! Glad to hear you are fine.

There is not a whole lot going on inside the handlebar switches other than the obvious wires. If you are comfortable working on your bike you will be fine.

I would give the bike good wash and then crack the cover open and clean out the switches. I probably would go buy a can of electronic cleaner and plan to use most of the can. Just flush it out and have some Q-tips ready to get the big pieces out. You could even use water, but make sure the keys are in your pocket. I would used compressed air and a heat gun maybe to dry it out completely before testing if I used only water.

Throw up some pics of your progress if you could, for the rest of us to see what to expect when the switches go swimming!!!

Also some people like to put di-electric grease on the contacts and/or around the sealing edges of the switches and switch housing. There are lots of different opinions about doing this so choose your own adventure!

Good Luck!!!
 

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Wow, that ain't no nap. Some call that a drowning.

Sounds like a meticulous operation to restore the beast. You were actually able to ride that home a day later?

Nevertheless, glad you weren't injured and I reckon with time the beast will be completely restored to normal.
 

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I'd replace cleaning water with Isopropyl Alcohol, think it also may be called rubbing alcohol in some parts, it evaporates exceptionally quick, and won't initiate corrosion on electrical contacts. Aerosiol Electronic cleaner will also fit the bill, just may not be as cheap in bulk.
Good luck man, made me cringe when I saw the pic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It was a miserable moment.
I thought I was smart by going around the small billabong which I landed into, underestimating the slipperyness of the mud and grass was my undoing.

This what I saw when I got her upright finally
Water Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Working animal


I had to scoop mug fulls of muddy water to clean off the handlebar gear to see if she would kick over.

On top of this I was about 600m of broken road to the nearest tarmac.
I was lucky enough to find a motorcycle enthusiast not far from the trail head who helped me get out of this hole and tow me back with his ATV.


Most definitely I will be documenting this repair, mostly for my own sake. So I can get it all back together properly.
At the moment, it is the rough action of the on/off switch and the ignition switch that give me some cause for concern
The throttle action is also abit "gritty"
Could probably ignore all this but I am sure it will bite me back at some time.
Will probably be a project I tackle over winter in my garage.

p.s. also rear brakes feel more spongy after this fall so the pads all around need replacing so I splurged and bought braided lines for the front brakes to improve the feel of the front end offraod.
The Scandi part of the trip were many high speed dirt roads. A lot of trailbraking into blind hills and blind bends. Would have been nice to have a lighter, more responsive action on those front brakes.
 

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At the moment, it is the rough action of the on/off switch and the ignition switch that give me some cause for concern
The throttle action is also abit "gritty"
I think the less you use anything that feels 'gritty' the better.

Each time switchgear is used, that gritty feeling is at best scoring the plastic guides which may lead to sticking buttons in the future or at worst scratching the surface of the electrical contacts.
Either will lead to possible permanent damage I would think.

I dont know to what level the switchgear can be disassembled, but I would be stripping everything as far down as I could.

Only good news I guess is that if the grit found its way in, it ought to be easily flushed out.

Sounding like you're in for a busy winter.

Best of luck, hope you manage to restore things back to the way she was prior to the dunking.
 
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