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I am in a good position to answer the OPs question regarding AT versus 250 Rally, as I have both.
First me, age 67, ridden since age 16. Too many bikes to list but all large capacity. Dont ride in winter due to salt. six foot 5 so need a tall bike.
March 2018 bought the ATAS, loved it and still do really. Lovely looking bike. Giving up riding from October to April was getting me down so I decided to buy a cheap bike to ride through winter on those cold sunny days . In the end I bought a new Rally. The idea was I would wash it after every ride and if it corroded a bit so what I still had my mint ATAS.
So how did I get on with the Rally after so many years on big bikes. My first impression was hey, no power, vans want to overtake me. Then I started to ride on small roads that I have avoided all these years. The lightness of the bike was great. I started to really really love the rally as it changed my riding completely. I found places I didnt know existed. I get 90mpg. It costs nothing to insure. Its a doddle to work on. I have added extras and modified suspension and I feel a bond with it that I dont feel on the AT
The biggest difference for me is the weight. The ATAS is tall and carries its weight high. By comparison the rally is a toy - a nice looking toy. If I had to give up one of the bikes it would be the ATAS. As I have room for both I will keep both. So far this year I have done twice as many rides on the rally than ATAS. So to conclude, the ATAS and Rally are totally different. In theory the ATAS will do what the rally will but you have to work at the slow bits. The Rally is a hoot to ride on smaller roads and changes your attitude to riding if you come from big bikes. If you dont want speed/distance its the rally.

The rally will most likely be my next bike. My oldest son will be getting one for his first bike. He's only ever ridden my crf230l, and while he's be fine on a cb500x or nc700x, after trying several, he prefers the slimmer machine.

He's 6'4" so he really needs something taller than my 230l. As for me, I just want to add a rally for a taller, lighter weight economical bike. I like motorcycles, so sue me馃榿
 

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Big Adventure bike, or Jeep Wrangler?
What do you all think?

Unless someone has the skill set to ride these big bikes on single track trails, what is the advantage to an Adventure Bike over a Wrangler?
Top down, flip flops, shorts, tank top. Plenty of cup holders, air conditioning, great stereo, no helmet to spoil the sights, sounds and smells.

I love my AT. I have no issues taking it on single track. If I was only to get as technical as a jeep trail, I'd have a Jeep again though.
56518
 

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I went the other direction. I went from loving my Gold Wings to wanting something smaller and lighter for back roads and fishing. So I went for the Honda NC700XD with the DCT and ABS. 2018 Gold Wings were sporting less weight, DCT & ABS, but I wondered if I would like the automatic thing on a bike and what about not being in complete control of the brakes. I loved the riding experience of the NC so much that I parted with a GL1800 and the NC700XD for the 2020 ATAS ES DCT ABS. The AT is considerably lighter than any of my Gold Wings since 1987, and what I missed about the NC was the power. I still have two Gold Wings for that style of riding. I love touring, but I鈥檓 looking forward to a wonderful relationship with my new ATAS. Of course, that will be once I get the fuel system straightened out. Darn it Honda!
 

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Big Adventure bike, or Jeep Wrangler?
What do you all think?

Unless someone has the skill set to ride these big bikes on single track trails, what is the advantage to an Adventure Bike over a Wrangler?
Top down, flip flops, shorts, tank top. Plenty of cup holders, air conditioning, great stereo, no helmet to spoil the sights, sounds and smells.

I love my AT. I have no issues taking it on single track. If I was only to get as technical as a jeep trail, I'd have a Jeep again though.
...
56520
 

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I change my bikes a lot, but try and keep at least 3 going at one time, just buy the 250 and then decide if you want to keep both or sell one.
 

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(y)

馃ぃ馃ぃ馃ぃ
ROFLMAO!
That was me holding the phone up in the air, but I like your version better. :)

On a serious note though, what drew you to the ADV bike over, say a Jeep or some other competent 4WD?

For me it was:
1). Getting down narrow single & double track trails a jeep couldn't go
2). Can't tow a 5th wheel and a Jeep in a lot of the states I'll be going to
3). Great parking spots :)
4). Cheap to register and insure
5). Already had 4WD, Dirt Bikes, Street bikes, never had an ADV bike (although my old KZ750 found it's way on a lot of dirt roads)
6). The paint scheme of the 2018 ATAS is just... pretty awesome!

So for my specific situation the ATAS is the best choice. Both from the head, and the heart.
If the KTM790 didn't have that hideous front face, I'd have bought it though, just for it's capabilities.
 

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(y)


ROFLMAO!
That was me holding the phone up in the air, but I like your version better. :)

On a serious note though, what drew you to the ADV bike over, say a Jeep or some other competent 4WD?

For me it was:
1). Getting down narrow single & double track trails a jeep couldn't go
2). Can't tow a 5th wheel and a Jeep in a lot of the states I'll be going to
3). Great parking spots :)
4). Cheap to register and insure
5). Already had 4WD, Dirt Bikes, Street bikes, never had an ADV bike (although my old KZ750 found it's way on a lot of dirt roads)
6). The paint scheme of the 2018 ATAS is just... pretty awesome!

So for my specific situation the ATAS is the best choice. Both from the head, and the heart.
If the KTM790 didn't have that hideous front face, I'd have bought it though, just for it's capabilities.
KTM has always been a bit utilitarian. No doubt Honda has the best looking ADV bike of the bunch. But I wouldn't mind owning another 690 Enduro or even a 390 to go along with the ATAS. I sold my 2016 690 Enduro last year thinking I didn't need both. But it was one of those bikes you part with and not long after really wish you hadn't.

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Its it a dire situation on the larger scale. Why should a bike loose its luster after a time tempting you to move on the a new shiny machine?
After all, most bikes will operate very well for at least 100,000 km. For most people that is 20years of life.

I have a 2017AT and love it. All its quirks and shortcomings as well. I have gradually made it mine by makeing a change here, a tweek there.
I plan on keeping it as long as I can.
The only times I am tempted by another bike is when my bike is off the road - usually more extensive work in prep for a tour.

This is where I am going to get all philosophical on you all:
We NEED to break this "chase the new" psychosis that marketeers have planted in our heads.
The planet really cannot handle us cycling through a new motorcycle every few years.
So many bikes that can still bring joy or be very functional, are tossed and feed landfills all over the world.

I love to follow the latest and newest innovations and styles with bikes, but I resist teh temptation to get on the upgrade treadmill. It keeps more bucks in my pocket to take my bike on more tours (the less money I need, the less work I have to do, the more time I get to ride my bike!)

So if I can offer a sliver of advice for those seduced by the dark side:
Love your bike, make it yours, bling it out if need be. Add things that make it really yours. Give it a name. Treat it like you friend rather than your bike.
You do not upgrade your friend because a better looking one comes along!
No, your friend becomes more valuable to you the better you get to know him/her.
 

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Its it a dire situation on the larger scale. Why should a bike loose its luster after a time tempting you to move on the a new shiny machine?
After all, most bikes will operate very well for at least 100,000 km. For most people that is 20years of life.

I have a 2017AT and love it. All its quirks and shortcomings as well. I have gradually made it mine by makeing a change here, a tweek there.
I plan on keeping it as long as I can.
The only times I am tempted by another bike is when my bike is off the road - usually more extensive work in prep for a tour.

This is where I am going to get all philosophical on you all:
We NEED to break this "chase the new" psychosis that marketeers have planted in our heads.
The planet really cannot handle us cycling through a new motorcycle every few years.
So many bikes that can still bring joy or be very functional, are tossed and feed landfills all over the world.

I love to follow the latest and newest innovations and styles with bikes, but I resist teh temptation to get on the upgrade treadmill. It keeps more bucks in my pocket to take my bike on more tours (the less money I need, the less work I have to do, the more time I get to ride my bike!)

So if I can offer a sliver of advice for those seduced by the dark side:
Love your bike, make it yours, bling it out if need be. Add things that make it really yours. Give it a name. Treat it like you friend rather than your bike.
You do not upgrade your friend because a better looking one comes along!
No, your friend becomes more valuable to you the better you get to know him/her.
Commercialism at its finest, the ability to get one to buy something that is just wanted but not actually needed..

I actually have a quote on this:
鈥淚f you can鈥檛 be happy with what you have , you can鈥檛 be happy with what you want to have.鈥
 
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Its it a dire situation on the larger scale. Why should a bike loose its luster after a time tempting you to move on the a new shiny machine?
After all, most bikes will operate very well for at least 100,000 km. For most people that is 20years of life.

I have a 2017AT and love it. All its quirks and shortcomings as well. I have gradually made it mine by makeing a change here, a tweek there.
I plan on keeping it as long as I can.
The only times I am tempted by another bike is when my bike is off the road - usually more extensive work in prep for a tour.

This is where I am going to get all philosophical on you all:
We NEED to break this "chase the new" psychosis that marketeers have planted in our heads.
The planet really cannot handle us cycling through a new motorcycle every few years.
So many bikes that can still bring joy or be very functional, are tossed and feed landfills all over the world.

I love to follow the latest and newest innovations and styles with bikes, but I resist teh temptation to get on the upgrade treadmill. It keeps more bucks in my pocket to take my bike on more tours (the less money I need, the less work I have to do, the more time I get to ride my bike!)

So if I can offer a sliver of advice for those seduced by the dark side:
Love your bike, make it yours, bling it out if need be. Add things that make it really yours. Give it a name. Treat it like you friend rather than your bike.
You do not upgrade your friend because a better looking one comes along!
No, your friend becomes more valuable to you the better you get to know him/her.
I guess it is too late to all those who acquired the 2020 ATAS. Routine firmware updates, updates that should happen, but don't, or come too lately. Then the competition gets their competitive product right and reliable, but of course, until the next firmware update breaks everything. The bike is not about the bling or the GUI, or streaming media to the rider. But, apparently it is.
 

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I'm always dreaming of getting another bike, but I highly doubt I'll be getting rid of my AT anytime soon. I have four bikes at the moment, two of them project bikes, so my goal is to finish them both to help fund my next one. I want something lighter for riding around town and doing some trail work. Dream bike is a CT90 or 110 (or new CT125) but they are hard to find here so maybe a CRF250L. If I can swing that I'll be very happy for a while. Have the AT for longer touring and day rides, CT or CRF for town and trails and my MB5 for ripping around town on the weekends. Although, I wouldn't mind a mid-sized standard bike like a SV650 too ;)
 

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'19 Husky FE501 was a great bike. Sold it and bought the AT.
It was comfortable to 55 mph. Sat tall, and once it was all sorted worked excellent off road. It's like a 05/95 bike street/dirt.
Pretty light at about 250 lbs, and plenty of torque/hp.
I road 60 miles of road to get to and from some epic trails once, and was comfortable. The only downside is the vibration on the street. It will make hands and feet go numb. Service intervals are pretty frequent (15 hours), and no cush-drive hub, which made me nervous for riding on the road.

It has good rake and trail, and good rider positioning. Brakes are very effective, engine has plenty of power, and will pull hard past 80mph. I wouldn't want to keep it there, but it pulls strong to redline in every gear, with a bit of tuning, exhaust and intake work.

It's the kind of a bike you could ride to an off road race event, race, and ride back home (as long as the trip to and from the race wasn't more than 100 miles). Some guys are turning them into "light adventure bikes". I think that is really stretching the "Adventure" moniker, but then I'm not an Iron-Butt rider.

If I did a Dual Sport again, I'd probably go KTM 350 EXC-F. Just to reduce the vibrations. Add a cushion drive rear hub, and all the normal stuff to make them run right. Then throw a rear rack on it.
The power of the 500 is pretty addictive, but the 350 would be plenty for back road/off road. Both are great in the city, with more street oriented tires.
56594
 

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I see this convo died a couple months ago.. which is probably a good thing for me. I just got my AT and hadn't seen the Husky 901 Norden concept. The power to weight looks to be a solid winner. The styling of the machine is just artistic to me. Some of the features on the concept (bars, extra tank, real hand guards) would make it even more appetizing. I already have a 701 and a 300 so I don't need a single track "touring" machine, nor do I need a 50/50 adv. That Norden seems to fit right in to why I wanted the AT. After drooling over the videos of the Norden, I remembered why I shied away from the 1090/1190 orange coolaid... reliability! My orange bikes (ok, orange in origin anyway) are fantastic at what they do buuuuut... the little things that ktm refuses to address just pisses me off. The clutch slave crapping out, exhaust that was made by Char-Broil, fuel pumps that can't keep up, and the botched suspension components on the 701 just left a bad taste in my mouth for more orange. Sure, I've fixed all that and they are outstanding machines now, but it's been a long expensive road. My AT only needs a bit of suspension mods to make it work for me. Maybe like others have said.. the 'newness' of the AT is mesmerizing me right now and may not last, but even as tasty as the 901 looks/sounds, I'm glad I wasn't tempted by new orange-aid.
 

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I see this convo died a couple months ago.. which is probably a good thing for me. I just got my AT and hadn't seen the Husky 901 Norden concept. The power to weight looks to be a solid winner. The styling of the machine is just artistic to me.
Nice to hear you have settled in a bit. I certainly have. Love the AT! It鈥檚 heavy, and my back hurts some after a dirt crash, but I鈥檝e had tons of fun over this 5 months. I get so many compliments on the looks.
 

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Big Adventure bike, or Jeep Wrangler?
What do you all think?

Unless someone has the skill set to ride these big bikes on single track trails, what is the advantage to an Adventure Bike over a Wrangler?
Top down, flip flops, shorts, tank top. Plenty of cup holders, air conditioning, great stereo, no helmet to spoil the sights, sounds and smells.

I love my AT. I have no issues taking it on single track. If I was only to get as technical as a jeep trail, I'd have a Jeep again though.
View attachment 56518
Well,
I know this shot of the Jeep is more than a couple of months old but, just in case he sees mine, I kind-a like to have the best of both worlds. Your Jeep shot almost looks like it might be in or around the actual Rubicon trail. We've done that Rubicon trail twice and that's enough. We've jeeped for over 35 years and have had 9 of them, including our present one, a '15 Jeep JKUR. Done all the Moab stuff, Easter Jeep Safari and all that for around 14 years in a row. Done all the Ouray/Silverton stuff too, lots of fun there.

But, as much as we still like Jeeping, I love the singleness of riding the AT all around. I won't take it in the complicated trails like we've Jeeped on but, it does see lots of forest service roads and things like that, as well as back country/county paved roads. When I say "best of both worlds", we take the A/T AND the Jeep on our little jaunts around the country.
Scott
 

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Well,
I know this shot of the Jeep is more than a couple of months old but, just in case he sees mine, I kind-a like to have the best of both worlds. Your Jeep shot almost looks like it might be in or around the actual Rubicon trail. We've done that Rubicon trail twice and that's enough. We've jeeped for over 35 years and have had 9 of them, including our present one, a '15 Jeep JKUR. Done all the Moab stuff, Easter Jeep Safari and all that for around 14 years in a row. Done all the Ouray/Silverton stuff too, lots of fun there.

But, as much as we still like Jeeping, I love the singleness of riding the AT all around. I won't take it in the complicated trails like we've Jeeped on but, it does see lots of forest service roads and things like that, as well as back country/county paved roads. When I say "best of both worlds", we take the A/T AND the Jeep on our little jaunts around the country.
Scott
Nice! (y)

The picture is Snake Lake trail in El Dorado NF. Very pretty area, and not near as crowded/over used, and smoothed out as Rubicon (Fordyce is a better trail for the wheeling). We did as much hiking around as we did wheeling around the Gold Lake area, and the fishing at Gold Lake is pretty excellent too.
Snake Lake Trail
The picture I posted is heading from Little Deer Lake to Snake Lake, about midway. This would be a fun trail on an AT, but at Snake Lake there is a pretty good boulder field that is a decent climb. Would have to figure a way around that, or just turn around. Lots of trails, fire roads, and fire look outs to get good vistas in El Dorado NF.
This is Little Deer lake, and you can see it's pretty easy for an ADV bike.
58096


Any way, the "singleness" of the bike is pretty great, although I miss taking the dog on trail trips. But I'm not about to give up the 5th wheel. It's a great platform to live out of for extended periods.
 

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FIRE UP, you are living the dream my friend!
The AT is fine for now, I've learned it pretty well over this summer.
AZ is on the agenda for next year.

I got to drive a friend's Jeep a few months back, and realized what I want when I CAN NO LONGER RIDE the AT.
Both would be nice, but...then I'd want a Honda 250 Rally to go along with it.

I also opt to pay for motel rooms on my bike travels.
Under $2k for a nice, two week tour.
A lot less work than camping as well.
I'm a city (of 6K) boy at heart.
 
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