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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I attempted my first tire change yesterday. Everything seemed to go well until the sprocket fell off. I had no idea it wasn't bolted on and was just stuck in there with some rubber dampers.

It look a long time to get the rubber pieces back in there and I'm not sure if I did it correctly. Is there a right and wrong way to do reinstall the rubber dampers?

Also, when I went to put the wheel back on, it no longer fits between the axle mounts. It's as if the wheel got a few mm wider during the process. Wondering if that has something to do with the sprocket falling off.

Has anyone experienced this before? Any tips?
 

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Se attached photo for how the rubber bumpers are installed. I think it would be pretty hard to install them incorrectly, but I guess it's possible. The sprocket is just a press fit back into the rubber bumpers - it shouldn't take too much effort to get it fully seated.

Not sure why the wheel got wider - are both of the spacers (one each side) fully seated into the wheel?
 

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Ok, for one I think you meant to say the sprocket CARRIER fell off and was not bolted on. If the sprocket itself was not bolted on, I think you would've had serious problems before ever even attempting to remove the wheel. The sprocket carrier is supposed to just "fall off". Every chain-driven bike I've ever owned has had a similar press-fitted sprocket carrier. And those rubber dampers you speak of are called cush bumpers or cush bushings or just cush drive. There's really only one way they can go in so I don't know why you're having trouble reinstalling those. It should be obvious.

As far as the wheel getting wider... well, it didn't. Either you have put a spacer in wrong (or added one where it didn't belong) or you're having trouble lining everything up so that you have a clear hole for the axle to insert. Maybe you're just having trouble getting the brake rotor to slide back between the pads. Or, the rear caliper is misaligned. Is your chain on the sprocket, or is it jammed down in between the carrier and swing-arm?
While it maybe a little laborious, the rear wheel removal and install is fairly simple and straightforward, and basically the same on most chain-driven bikes. The only gotcha is to make sure spacers, washers, etc. go back in the correct spot. Always pay close attention when you're removing them so you don't f-up on reassembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Se attached photo for how the rubber bumpers are installed. I think it would be pretty hard to install them incorrectly, but I guess it's possible. The sprocket is just a press fit back into the rubber bumpers - it shouldn't take too much effort to get it fully seated.

Not sure why the wheel got wider - are both of the spacers (one each side) fully seated into the wheel?
Thanks for this post as it was useful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When removing a rear wheel with a cush drive, put some cable ties through the sprocket to the spokes in the rear wheal and it will stay entire and make it easier when refitting the rear wheel. Three is usually plenty.
Pete.
Great idea, thanks for the help.
 

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Just swapped my standard wheels for Rally Raid tubeless. Easy front swap, unbolt one brake calliper, undo bolts wheel out, swap discs, wheel in and bolt up.

Rear wheel axle out, swap disc and abs ring, swear a lot trying to lift a bloody heavy wheel up to slide the axle in, slide in and bolt up, apologise to neighbour for fruity language.
 

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On the rear wheel ass'y, the spacers cannot be changed left to right- different widths.
 

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Just swapped my standard wheels for Rally Raid tubeless. Easy front swap, unbolt one brake calliper, undo bolts wheel out, swap discs, wheel in and bolt up.

Rear wheel axle out, swap disc and abs ring, swear a lot trying to lift a bloody heavy wheel up to slide the axle in, slide in and bolt up, apologise to neighbour for fruity language.
ABBA stands do a great trolley tool for changing rear wheels, I do a few and bought one, makes lifting up, aligning and sliding in the spindle and fitting hardware a breeze. Highly recommended.

Regards

Stuart
 

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Just swapped my standard wheels for Rally Raid tubeless. Easy front swap, unbolt one brake calliper, undo bolts wheel out, swap discs, wheel in and bolt up.

Rear wheel axle out, swap disc and abs ring, swear a lot trying to lift a bloody heavy wheel up to slide the axle in, slide in and bolt up, apologise to neighbour for fruity language.
I also regularly launched into a Tourettes type rant when trying to line up multiple axle parts and spacers while holding a wheel up, my top tip - loop a tie down through the back wheel and over the seat , it can be adjusted up or down taking all the weight off the wheel and holding it in position while lining up those pesky spacers!

Mike
 

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As im an old fart now, Ive bought a jack to raise and lower the bike to aid with axle insertion...
But
Prior to this I always used to crouch at the back of the bike with my foot under the rear wheel, that way you can rock on your heel and lift the wheel up as you slide the axle through the hole.
Works a treat if theres no one on hand to help you.
 

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As im an old fart now, Ive bought a jack to raise and lower the bike to aid with axle insertion...
But
Prior to this I always used to crouch at the back of the bike with my foot under the rear wheel, that way you can rock on your heel and lift the wheel up as you slide the axle through the hole.
Works a treat if theres no one on hand to help you.
ABBA do a great tool, red frame on wheels with a sliding section that adjusts height to sit snugly under wheel and offer it up and align with spindle...makes the job very easy. For the man who has everything (else). I got one for Christmas a few years back and use it on every bike...makes the job straightforward.
 

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During the reinstall of the rear tire I took 2 paver bricks I had leftover from a landscape project, 2 1/2 inches wide. 1 in front and 1 in back of the tire. Raise the tire and put the bricks under front and back. Then as you need to adjust you adjust the bricks to raise/lower tire and also to move in and out of position ...especially while prying in a bit with a screwdriver as it is..as stated earlier, a very tight fit. You could do this with 2x4s and also if out in the wild I'd expect it would be fairly easy to do with a couple of rocks as well.
 
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