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It's my understanding that the leading front axle should help add some stability as well as gains in suspension travel?

Anyone with more technical know how know for sure?
 

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It's my understanding that the leading front axle should help add some stability as well as gains in suspension travel?

Anyone with more technical know how know for sure?
Yes, it's possible to provide more suspension travel as it effectively allows the fork to be longer. But it reduces trail and hence stability compared to if the axle was in-line with the fork tube centreline. But if the rest of the geometry has been correctly designed, the rake and trail etc should be correct for the bike. No need to think they've somehow got it wrong and in fact moving the axle forward (if you could) would make for heavier steering etc. and less agile handling. The amount of trial is always a compromise.

Since in at least one of the reviews the journalist rode it at over 120 mph and said it was very steady, I think we can assume Honda have done their sums and got the right answer. :wink2:
 

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Leading axle in effect changes the steering angle as you turn the bars reducing the steering rake the harder you turn the steering.
This give you more straight line stability but steering 'rake' reduces as you turn the bars therefore reducing stability hence making it easier to turn the more you turn the bars.
That way you get variable steering geometry, a compromise between stable straight line and nimble turning.
You may notice, as I have the bike is a bit hard to weave in traffic as it wants to go straight but at low speed acute angles of turn and full lock it is quit easy to steer.
 

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Leading axle in effect changes the steering angle as you turn the bars reducing the steering rake the harder you turn the steering.
This give you more straight line stability but steering 'rake' reduces as you turn the bars therefore reducing stability hence making it easier to turn the more you turn the bars.
That way you get variable steering geometry, a compromise between stable straight line and nimble turning.
You may notice, as I have the bike is a bit hard to weave in traffic as it wants to go straight but at low speed acute angles of turn and full lock it is quit easy to steer.
No, not actually correct. Moving the axle forward or back using a leading or trailing axle fork design doesn't affect the steering angle/rake. It changes the trail. The relationship between rake and trail and how they affect steering feel is complex and beyond the scope of this thread.
 
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