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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What lifting devices have you seen to pick it up when it lies down?

None of us would ever 'drop' our bikes, but if it just got tired and lay over, and we wanted to pick it up again, and the methods they show in all the videos online of how to do it by hand - don't work - what devices are there?

I just did a comparison of what seem the two best 'bike lifting devices' for the AT, but am interested to see if others have better suggestions.

DustRiders Hoist VS MotoBikeJack

I believe the DustRiders Hoist came first and then the MotoBikeJack copied and changed it, then patented it, and now their website claims they 'invented' it.

Both come in 4 pieces
Both have a similar ratchet device attached to the top piece, with webbing and a plastic coated hook.

MotoBikeJack has just one bigger base plate while DustRiders Hoist has a Y shaped base with 2 smaller base plates

MotoBikeJack is smaller, packing to 33cm x 13cm (13’ x 5’ inch) while the DustRiders Hoist is longer and wider at 49cm x 21cm x 5cm (19.3’ x 8.3’ x 3’ inches).

MotoBikeJack is also lighter, at 3.52kg (7 Lb 12oz) than the DustRiders Hoist 4kg (9 Lb)

MotoBikeJack is cheaper, at US $247.50 than the DustRiders Hoist US $249.95

MotoBikeJack assembled height is 78cm (31’inch) tall, which is shorter than the DustRiders Hoist that is 109cm (43” inch) tall

The one footed MotoBikeJack is obviously less stable than the dual footed DustRiders. I watched someone lifting a bike and he had to keep his foot on the MotoBikeJack base plate to stop it sliding.

It seems many people have copied the Original, does anyone on this forum have either of them or a completely different alternative?
 

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What lifting devices have you seen to pick it up when it lies down?
I rely on a combination of muscles and technique, with a generous sprinkling of expletives. I don't think carrying a hoist would be very practical. When the muscles are no longer up to the job, I'll accept it's time for a smaller, lighter bike!
 

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I rely on a combination of muscles and technique, with a generous sprinkling of expletives. I don't think carrying a hoist would be very practical. When the muscles are no longer up to the job, I'll accept it's time for a smaller, lighter bike!

This^^^^.... when your looking at stuff to stand your bike up... you got too much junk onboard, unload it but only put half the crap back on....or use a car.
 

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Yeah the lifting techniques do work, particularly the handlebar lever method. The backwards walking method I have found to be a bit harder but it does work. That said I can also see how you could hurt yourself trying both methods. The other thing I have seen is people using small car jacks to just jack it up a bit then it is very easy to just lift it vertical. If you ride in areas where there is a lot of trees you could lift it using a normal ratchet strap attached to a tree, that would be cheaper I guess.
 

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I used to think the same thing. I work out regularly and consider myself to be in pretty good shape. I've owned and dropped some heavier bikes (Super Tenere for one) and was always able to pick it up even in loose sand. I've also ridden with guys who didn't know the various techniques and showed them how to lift a big bike.

Then one day I was riding solo (Triumph Tiger XCx which is lighter than the AT or Super Tenere) up a steep and narrow trail with loose rocks and a "wash out" down the center of the trail. It was getting more narrow so I tried to turn around but stalled the motor and dropped it. It was laying at a bad angle. I pulled the front wheel so it faced downhill. It still wasn't good as the top of the bike was laying in the "V" of the wash out. All the weight at the top of the bike with both wheels in the air. I had to lift hard just to get the wheels to touch the ground to use them as leverage. But I would still be lifting "uphill" onto the ledge of the "V". I tried several time with different techniques to lift it and I could not. I took a break, had my power bar and some water, did my breathing like I do before I lift at the gym and gave it a go. No joy. I wound up straining quads, glutes, and traps.

I waited for about 1/2 hour before a couple dirt bike riders came by and were able to get me upright.

Two things I learned; I really shouldn't ride in semi-remote places by myself and there are circumstance where you'll find you just can't get that bike back up on two-wheels.

After that event, I too seriously considered carrying some type of a "jack" or "lift". Now I don't know how well one would have worked in the circumstances I was in, but I would have loved to at least have had something that might have helped.

I rely on a combination of muscles and technique, with a generous sprinkling of expletives. I don't think carrying a hoist would be very practical. When the muscles are no longer up to the job, I'll accept it's time for a smaller, lighter bike!
 

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What lifting devices have you seen to pick it up when it lies down?

None of us would ever 'drop' our bikes, but if it just got tired and lay over, and we wanted to pick it up again, and the methods they show in all the videos online of how to do it by hand - don't work - what devices are there?

I just did a comparison of what seem the two best 'bike lifting devices' for the AT, but am interested to see if others have better suggestions.

DustRiders Hoist VS MotoBikeJack

I believe the DustRiders Hoist came first and then the MotoBikeJack copied and changed it, then patented it, and now their website claims they 'invented' it.

Both come in 4 pieces
Both have a similar ratchet device attached to the top piece, with webbing and a plastic coated hook.

MotoBikeJack has just one bigger base plate while DustRiders Hoist has a Y shaped base with 2 smaller base plates

MotoBikeJack is smaller, packing to 33cm x 13cm (13’ x 5’ inch) while the DustRiders Hoist is longer and wider at 49cm x 21cm x 5cm (19.3’ x 8.3’ x 3’ inches).

MotoBikeJack is also lighter, at 3.52kg (7 Lb 12oz) than the DustRiders Hoist 4kg (9 Lb)

MotoBikeJack is cheaper, at US $247.50 than the DustRiders Hoist US $249.95

MotoBikeJack assembled height is 78cm (31’inch) tall, which is shorter than the DustRiders Hoist that is 109cm (43” inch) tall

The one footed MotoBikeJack is obviously less stable than the dual footed DustRiders. I watched someone lifting a bike and he had to keep his foot on the MotoBikeJack base plate to stop it sliding.

It seems many people have copied the Original, does anyone on this forum have either of them or a completely different alternative?
Hi fella, you need porridge in the morning !!:grin2:

M
 

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Great thread because I've been wondering if such a tool existed. I have a very bad back and quite honestly I fear the day I drop the AT.

I don't see how those two devices would work if our bikes laid flat.

There's gotta be some of you out there smart enough to come up with a fail proof jack design.
 

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I find the AT very easy to lift. Handle bar method I prefer. Had it down twice intentionally and once when I first fitted my barkbuster when I rolled if the stand.
 

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I find the AT very easy to lift. Handle bar method I prefer.
Must be the spinach!

I struggled but eventually got mine up (it was lying down slope), and, I agree, it's possible to get some good leverage using the bars. I guess help would arrive in most cases, unless you're in a remote area. I do think it's worth owners practicing lifting the AT - it's a tall bike and easy to drop when doing slow speed manoeuvres, if you let go the concentration for a split second! Once you know you can get it back up, it's reassuring.

Incidentally, mine fell 'gently' at almost zero speed - enough to smash the OEM 'handguard' to pieces. What a useless bit of kit they are!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can pick mine up every time, except the times that I cannot. On the front lawn easy, on a flat area easy. Practicing, yes no problems. But after 2 hours on the footpads offroad, up a hill, on an angle, with loose gravel or soft sand and ruts - it beat me. And beat me again. So I am thinking there has to be another way.

Yes I know my grandma (and some more sensible riders) would say "well you shouldn't be out there alone then," or "you should get a smaller bike then". But thats as logical as saying "we don't have wings so shouldn't find ways to fly". Man wants to do things, so invents stuff to let him do it. So I want to push myself and my AT, I want to go where I shouldn't and want to figure out how to get myself out of a jam when it all comes apart. I carry a rope and have even used a rope to assist. I have even been pondering an airbag system like I use when going 4x4. Or something like those air inflated shockys may assist. All offroad ADV bikers seem to carry a little compressor - so I wonder if there is a solution there. Hmmm....?
 

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On a hill, in particular a gravel hill, mistake many make i not strapping the front brake up first. I've seen colleagues lift their bikes only to drop it again because the bike is trying to run away. Strap the front brake with a tiewrap or a velcro strap before lifting on a hill. If it is in gear, great.

On hill the best method is to use the bars as you maintain control over the bike Again, I have seen countless bikers off road lift the bike with their back to it only for it to fall on the opposite side.
 
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