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Should I stay away from the AT Adventure Sports model because of that fuel tank issue? It seems to be pervasive and potentially difficult to eliminate.
 

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Should I stay away from the AT Adventure Sports model because of that fuel tank issue? It seems to be pervasive and potentially difficult to eliminate.
I don't think so. You have a couple of options here. You can install one of those Guglatech filters from the get-go and potentially avoid the issue or you can make sure that if it does happen that the dealership follows Honda's recommendation for cleaning the tank prior to replacing the fuel pump, injectors. Apparently, from my convo with American Honda, if done correctly, it shouldn't require more than 1 service.

Once serviced for the issue, it follows your VIN, and Honda owns the issue for the life of the bike, regardless of warranty status.

Also, it does not appear that every bike is affected. Double Thumper and AT-Dragon do not appear to have had the problem. I think it is more a minority of bikes that are affected.

I don't think you need to steer clear. Just be aware of it and take action proactively and/or get it repaired when/if it does occur.
 

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I have a 2016DCT and I absolutely love it. No problems with rusting spokes or failing switch gear guess I am just lucky. I am an older guy (55) not built like a brick sh*t house and it's a handful but what a handful.
When it's up and heading forward it's the best thing since sliced bread. It loves to go fast and it rides the roughest stuff I am capable of doing mentally and physically. Someone told me very early on. When in trouble on a hill say just keep on going don't stop as you'll never pick it up on a hill!

So. Would I buy another one? Maybe yes. Wish it was a bit lighter but I love the torque and how playful it is. The DCT let's you concentrate on having fun and not stalling say from being in the wrong gear.

The AS is too large and heavy for my use. I have a Wing for long trips so I just use the AT for off road and having fun. It's the most fun I have had on a bike and can keep up no problem with the big boys.



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That is a fantastic price on a 2017 - I would say buy it if you have already decided on the AT. I have had no problems with my 2017 manual. The only thing is that they are heavy, more exactly a bit top heavy. But if you are willing to "ride it" (use it with intent) then it is a good do (most) anything and go (most) anywhere bike. I like having dealers everywhere too. I really do not understand why these bikes have lost so much value - they are great. I have owned over 30 motorcycles over the years FWIW and am not a Honda 'fanatic.'
 

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Smiles,
First off, the Honda CRF1000L, in any version, IS NOT THE ONLY LEFT OVER bike on show room floors. There are Goldwings, Harleys, BMW's and more that have one, two and three year old models still on the floor. It's a long story but, in short, it's a known fact that motorcycle sales IN GENERAL, have fallen quite steeply in the last few years. Harley's lost a ton of money and stock pricing has taken it in the shorts too. So, don't just look at the Africa Twin as something that's not selling. It's across the board. DoubleThumper did a great job of explaining much of the content of this (and primarily EVERY forum). A buddy of mine years and years ago, stated a fairly strong truth about forums. They are close to 75% B/S and entertainment and around 25% truths. And even that's debatable. The boys on here are darn good at answering questions and providing quality information. I've learned a lot from them.

Second, as has been somewhat explained, The DCT model is a fully automatic operating motorcycle. Can you "turn it off" well, sorta. By that I mean, on your right handle bar grip, there's the switches that control both NEUTRAL and, DRIVE or SPORT modes. Neutral is neutral, nothing to explain there. DRIVE is just like putting your cars transmission in D. Once in D, the car's engine and trans, take care of life for you. You just give it gas and steer it, DONE! In the SPORT mode, all that does is change shift patterns for a more spirited type of driving/operation. It is still TOTALLY AUTOMATIC in operation, just different that DRIVE.

But, right next to the N/D/S switch, is a button labeled: A/M. That stands for AUTOMATIC or, MANUAL. This is the button that "sorta" disconnects the DCT AUTOMATIC operation. Push that button and, YOU are now in CONTROL of ALL SHIFTING, PERIOD! And that is done by the - and + paddles on the left handle bar. And THAT, is how you sorta, disconnect or, turn off the DCT automatic operation. Push that button again and, you're back in either of the two automatic modes.

I've owned my New Old Stock 2018 AT/AS DCT now for going on one month. I have presently, 491 miles on it. I considered a brand new 2020 AT/AS DCT but, the base price on that model is $17,999.00 That's a whopping $7,000 more than I paid for an almost identical bike. Yes, the 2020 versions DO have quite a few improvements/modifications/alterations etc. But, $7,000 more, for those mods, nope, not gonna happen. I can say without one restraint, I'm SERIOUSLY happy with this bike. The 2020 DOES have two improvements that I not only would like to have but, am timelessly used to for decades and decades of Goldwing piloting. And those are self canceling turn signals and factory CRUISE CONTROL!

But, BOTH of those can be remedied with aftermarket electronic retrofits. Those are to be added to mine someday, maybe soon.
As for any of the potential issues, well, as of yet, in my limited time ownership, I've experienced absolutely NONE of them. No corrosion, no gas tank weld slag clogging up the fuel lines (if that's really the cause) and all that. If I were to inherit money tomorrow and were thinking of a new bike, (again, mine's less than a month old), I'd simply run down and buy a 2020 AT/AS DCT just to get what I consider drastically important to ME. But, inheritance is not in my future so, my '18 is doing and gonna do, just fantastic.

I had an XR650L too. While at the time, several years ago, I thought it was pretty good. But, the AT/AS DCT makes that XR650L look, ride and feel like a Wright brothers plane compared to 757.
Scott
 

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Smiles,
First off, the Honda CRF1000L, in any version, IS NOT THE ONLY LEFT OVER bike on show room floors. There are Goldwings, Harleys, BMW's and more that have one, two and three year old models still on the floor. It's a long story but, in short, it's a known fact that motorcycle sales IN GENERAL, have fallen quite steeply in the last few years. Harley's lost a ton of money and stock pricing has taken it in the shorts too. So, don't just look at the Africa Twin as something that's not selling. It's across the board. DoubleThumper did a great job of explaining much of the content of this (and primarily EVERY forum). A buddy of mine years and years ago, stated a fairly strong truth about forums. They are close to 75% B/S and entertainment and around 25% truths. And even that's debatable. The boys on here are darn good at answering questions and providing quality information. I've learned a lot from them.

Second, as has been somewhat explained, The DCT model is a fully automatic operating motorcycle. Can you "turn it off" well, sorta. By that I mean, on your right handle bar grip, there's the switches that control both NEUTRAL and, DRIVE or SPORT modes. Neutral is neutral, nothing to explain there. DRIVE is just like putting your cars transmission in D. Once in D, the car's engine and trans, take care of life for you. You just give it gas and steer it, DONE! In the SPORT mode, all that does is change shift patterns for a more spirited type of driving/operation. It is still TOTALLY AUTOMATIC in operation, just different that DRIVE.

But, right next to the N/D/S switch, is a button labeled: A/M. That stands for AUTOMATIC or, MANUAL. This is the button that "sorta" disconnects the DCT AUTOMATIC operation. Push that button and, YOU are now in CONTROL of ALL SHIFTING, PERIOD! And that is done by the - and + paddles on the left handle bar. And THAT, is how you sorta, disconnect or, turn off the DCT automatic operation. Push that button again and, you're back in either of the two automatic modes.

I've owned my New Old Stock 2018 AT/AS DCT now for going on one month. I have presently, 491 miles on it. I considered a brand new 2020 AT/AS DCT but, the base price on that model is $17,999.00 That's a whopping $7,000 more than I paid for an almost identical bike. Yes, the 2020 versions DO have quite a few improvements/modifications/alterations etc. But, $7,000 more, for those mods, nope, not gonna happen. I can say without one restraint, I'm SERIOUSLY happy with this bike. The 2020 DOES have two improvements that I not only would like to have but, am timelessly used to for decades and decades of Goldwing piloting. And those are self canceling turn signals and factory CRUISE CONTROL!

But, BOTH of those can be remedied with aftermarket electronic retrofits. Those are to be added to mine someday, maybe soon.
As for any of the potential issues, well, as of yet, in my limited time ownership, I've experienced absolutely NONE of them. No corrosion, no gas tank weld slag clogging up the fuel lines (if that's really the cause) and all that. If I were to inherit money tomorrow and were thinking of a new bike, (again, mine's less than a month old), I'd simply run down and buy a 2020 AT/AS DCT just to get what I consider drastically important to ME. But, inheritance is not in my future so, my '18 is doing and gonna do, just fantastic.

I had an XR650L too. While at the time, several years ago, I thought it was pretty good. But, the AT/AS DCT makes that XR650L look, ride and feel like a Wright brothers plane compared to 757.
Scott
I don't disagree at all that the Honda CRF1000L isn't the only left over on the sales floor. Other brands have the same issue. Some even have new models aren't selling that well. The Local BMW/Triumph/Royel Enfield dealer has been having an "employee pricing" sale on new models for the last few months. Bike sales are down in general.

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Yes Sir,
After WWII, the Korean War etc., the baby boomers and many of the Millenia gen seemed to have this Steve McQueen and Then came Bronson frame of mind. The popularity of M/C's for years in all aspects, racing/collecting/police/recreation/transportation/and much, much more, drove sales of M/C's into the high marks for years and years. But, as things progressed, the X generation, cost's of living, costs of MOTORCYCLES and much more rose, the todays minds, are NOT quite as hip on motorcycle owning and riding. Yes, there's still quite a few out there but, take a good look at the age group that's still supporting them.
Those of you older folks with say, 16-21 year olds still at home, how many of those teen - early 20's year olds, are actually interested in riding a motorcycle for general transportation, not just recreational stuff?
Scott
 

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Yes Sir,
After WWII, the Korean War etc., the baby boomers and many of the Millenia gen seemed to have this Steve McQueen and Then came Bronson frame of mind. The popularity of M/C's for years in all aspects, racing/collecting/police/recreation/transportation/and much, much more, drove sales of M/C's into the high marks for years and years. But, as things progressed, the X generation, cost's of living, costs of MOTORCYCLES and much more rose, the todays minds, are NOT quite as hip on motorcycle owning and riding. Yes, there's still quite a few out there but, take a good look at the age group that's still supporting them.
Those of you older folks with say, 16-21 year olds still at home, how many of those teen - early 20's year olds, are actually interested in riding a motorcycle for general transportation, not just recreational stuff?
Scott
Probably goes sumthin' like this:

" ... waaaa-t. I'm busy. Ride a wha? A motorcycle? How disrespectful to matha earth. Besides, I can ride one virtually anytime. Can you pass over my USB charger? ... what's with the Wi-Fi in this house ... "

= = =

In my case I started riding because I couldn't afford a car and had no access to the only family car (a stationwagon). So I grudgingly scraped together some stash and bought a beater (Yamaha RD400) and some insurance. It was like, " ... this is a drag ... ", and I just got my car license. Anyway, it didn't take long to realilze, " ... whoa, this is pretty cool ... ", and never looked back. The girlfriends seemed to agree.
 

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Probably goes sumthin' like this, " ... waaaa-t. I'm busy. Ride a wha? A motorcycle? How disrespectful to matha earth. Besides, I can ride one virtually anytime. Can you pass over my USB charger? ... "

= = =

In my case I started riding because I couldn't afford a car and had no access to the only family car (a stationwagon). So I grudgingly scraped together some stash and bought a beater (Yamaha RD400) and some insurance. It was like, " ... this is a drag ... ", and I just got my car license. Anyway, it didn't take long to realilze, " ... whoa, this is pretty cool ... ", and never looked back. The girlfriends seemed to agree.
You probably aren't far off. Affordable electric bikes with some decent range might be what it takes to get some of them interested.

My wife took a test ride on a Zero SR/F and had a blast, but the range is still a bit short and with the optional power tank and quick charger the price is almost $27,000. They do have some less expensive models, but range decreases and charge time increases.

I do see some younger riders on Groms as part of the Denver Grom Squad and I think the Monkeys sell well.



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Hah!
You guys crack me up. "pass the USB charger, RD 400, ride a wha?"
"Denver Grom Squad", man would I like to see those go by! A whole bunch of Groms and or Monkeys zooming by, I'd be laughing so hard I'd fall off my AT (I almost do that anyways).

I just wish I'd have gotten into this Adventure Bike thing a long time ago. While the year dictated (sort-a) me delving into the AT/AS DCT thing, and the older Adventure bikes were SEREIOUSLY more primitive, it still might have been fun to do some cross country stuff. I met a guy on line, a Dallas - Fort Worth fireman who, had a group of buddies that, on occaision, would ride from Texas to CO and, ALMOST NEVER TOUCH ANY PAVEMENT!!!!!!!!!!! They'd find way out-of-the-way hotels that were there in the right places for adventure riding. What a blast.
But, being married, raising two kids, working (3) jobs (yes, many firemen of my era had multiple jobs) just didn't allow for Adventuring into the outback.

Anyway, I've ventured off the main topic too far, sorry about that.
Scott
 

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Hah!
You guys crack me up. "pass the USB charger, RD 400, ride a wha?"
"Denver Grom Squad", man would I like to see those go by! A whole bunch of Groms and or Monkeys zooming by, I'd be laughing so hard I'd fall off my AT (I almost do that anyways).

I just wish I'd have gotten into this Adventure Bike thing a long time ago. While the year dictated (sort-a) me delving into the AT/AS DCT thing, and the older Adventure bikes were SEREIOUSLY more primitive, it still might have been fun to do some cross country stuff. I met a guy on line, a Dallas - Fort Worth fireman who, had a group of buddies that, on occaision, would ride from Texas to CO and, ALMOST NEVER TOUCH ANY PAVEMENT!!!!!!!!!!! They'd find way out-of-the-way hotels that were there in the right places for adventure riding. What a blast.
But, being married, raising two kids, working (3) jobs (yes, many firemen of my era had multiple jobs) just didn't allow for Adventuring into the outback.

Anyway, I've ventured off the main topic too far, sorry about that.
Scott

I think mostly what the do is wheelie down the streets on the way to parking garages where they try to get themselves killed :)


This is a fun watch if you like the Honda Monkey and Adventure Riding, ...

 

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Well,.
The Grom Squad was a bit of a let down. I guess they're doing what they want to do, albeit some of their moves are assinine (spelling?). As for the Throttle Out episode of the two Monkeys, that was a crackup. The wife and I watched that episode when it first aired a year or so ago. I've ridden a monkey bike and, I gotta tell ya, I'm 6' 2.5" and around 244 and that little Monkey bike does pretty darn good with me on it. I almost bought one but, the price tag of around $5,000 out the door, for such a small bike, to be used for minimal run-a-round stuff in town, naw, ain't gonna happen.
Scott
 

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In my case I started riding because I couldn't afford a car and had no access to the only family car (a stationwagon). So I grudgingly scraped together some stash and bought a beater (Yamaha RD400) and some insurance. It was like, " ... this is a drag ... ", and I just got my car license. Anyway, it didn't take long to realilze, " ... whoa, this is pretty cool ... ", and never looked back. The girlfriends seemed to agree.
Similar start to riding for me. The decrease in motorcycle sales has had multiple causes, at least in North America. As riders we are partially at fault but so is the motorcycle media. In my early riding years Honda was advertising heavily with small and some mid-size bikes. "You meet the nicest people on a Honda". At least some on this forum remember that. Until not too many years ago whenever a potential new rider would ask advice on what to buy, both magazines and riders would be pushing 500cc+ for a first bike. Comments were along the line that a new rider would outgrow a smaller bike so fast it would be a waste of money. There is the North American attitude bigger is better and small or smaller is terrible. No matter what way you look at it a 600cc sport bike is basically a street legal road racer, hardly suitable for a novice. Small displacement novice friendly bikes were discourage and disparage to no end. Then Honda brought the CBR125RR to the North American market. First year, they sold out by May or June, second year by August and third year by September. The other manufacturers started to notice and try claim part of the ignored market. As the riders from these small new bikes gained riding skills and advanced to larger bikes, these small used and less expensive bikes became available to others who might want to try riding without making a very sizeable financial outlay for something they might not enjoy.

It is frustrating to watch it all. Small bikes are readily available and plentiful everywhere except here. Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the United Kingdom have graduated licensing which restricts new riders to small displacement machines. As they become more proficient they can test on a larger displacement bike and move on to the next level. Ontario screwed up big time on its graduated system. There are some good provisions in it but no restrictions on the size of the bike. A new rider can hop on a Grom, Vespa, or even a Kawasaki supercharged H2.

Insurance doesn't help either. If you think insurance is expensive south of the Canadian border, you need to have someone beside you with smelling salts for your first peek at a motorcycle insurance quote here in Ontario. After all of that many Millennials seem to have no interest in driving or riding unless it is on public transit. Don't hold your breath till things improve. The resulting shade of blue might clash with your AT. :sneaky:
 

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I found this rant about what's happening in the US MC market amusing... Gives some perspective on why there are 2 and 3 years of models deep in the US dealerships... Why no one will sell you the bike you want.

Have to admit, walking by the Ducati Scramblers, they look like they might be fun. Not sure about the whole made in Thailand thing, though. I had enough trouble with switches and electronics on Italian Ducatis over the years.
 

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Wouldn't it be tough to justify nearly $5k for a Grom, when there are 2017 AT's on the same floor for less than $9k? I think the $5k includes a huge amount of markup for "trendy."
 

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My first m/c was at age 17 and, it was a brand new, 1970 Norton 750 Commando! I was a true, Then came Bronson fan/rider, BEENIE and all! I've had probably around oh, maybe 30 motorcycles since that first one. My liking for them has been like a heartbeat, up, down, up, down but, still ridin'. I retired from over 35 years of Goldwing piloting to pilot this new AT/AS DCT. I don't know if this is gonna be my last bike. Mama's not as happy on the back of the AT as she was in the full reclining position of the back of the Wing. But, I'm not muscling around over 900 lbs either, like I was.

Yeah, the slack in sales could be the motorcycle media, for sure. Both my son and son-in-law like motorcycles but, not enough to make one their daily transportation. They got other things on their minds. That's ok with me though. AS much as I'd like to see them both ride alongside me, I'd also rather not see them scraped off the road 'cause there was some distracted driver on a cell phone.

Whatever comes of the motorcycle industry, I hope it survives, in spite of the LAST generation not carrying on tradition.
Scott
 

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Similar start to riding for me. The decrease in motorcycle sales has had multiple causes, at least in North America. As riders we are partially at fault but so is the motorcycle media. In my early riding years Honda was advertising heavily with small and some mid-size bikes. "You meet the nicest people on a Honda". At least some on this forum remember that. Until not too many years ago whenever a potential new rider would ask advice on what to buy, both magazines and riders would be pushing 500cc+ for a first bike. Comments were along the line that a new rider would outgrow a smaller bike so fast it would be a waste of money. There is the North American attitude bigger is better and small or smaller is terrible. No matter what way you look at it a 600cc sport bike is basically a street legal road racer, hardly suitable for a novice. Small displacement novice friendly bikes were discourage and disparage to no end. Then Honda brought the CBR125RR to the North American market. First year, they sold out by May or June, second year by August and third year by September. The other manufacturers started to notice and try claim part of the ignored market. As the riders from these small new bikes gained riding skills and advanced to larger bikes, these small used and less expensive bikes became available to others who might want to try riding without making a very sizeable financial outlay for something they might not enjoy.

It is frustrating to watch it all. Small bikes are readily available and plentiful everywhere except here. Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the United Kingdom have graduated licensing which restricts new riders to small displacement machines. As they become more proficient they can test on a larger displacement bike and move on to the next level. Ontario screwed up big time on its graduated system. There are some good provisions in it but no restrictions on the size of the bike. A new rider can hop on a Grom, Vespa, or even a Kawasaki supercharged H2.

Insurance doesn't help either. If you think insurance is expensive south of the Canadian border, you need to have someone beside you with smelling salts for your first peek at a motorcycle insurance quote here in Ontario. After all of that many Millennials seem to have no interest in driving or riding unless it is on public transit. Don't hold your breath till things improve. The resulting shade of blue might clash with your AT. :sneaky:
(+1) Agreed. Provincial insurance is a large disincentive. I am not sure if I would bother if I was a teenager again.
 

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You've been given plenty to think about. I have a non AS 2018 build manual and love the bike. It's not perfect and some of the smaller components are very poor quality. However, these are few and easily remedied. Regarding the transmission choice, there is much on here about the pro's and con's of DCT. It seems to me that the DCT community seem more sensitive to any adverse comments. I bought a manual for simplicity as I only ride for pleasure. Before acting in haste and repenting at leisure, I would ensure it was an AT that I wanted and that I had DCT experience to help the decide this was the transmission for me before pulling the trigger. The hungry salesman will sell you any old crap he needs to move and his job is to conceal the reason you shouldn't buy the product. As has been said here, there are also other makes and models for consideration. The damage this virus will do to our economy will put the buyer in a strong position.

PS: From all I have learned, if I bought a new motorcycle tomorrow it would probably still be a manual AT, on condition the price was right. The new 2020 RRP model prices are too high in comparison for what you get buying an earlier stock model. Honda needs to be more commercial and at the 2020 price, I would probably also want a shaft.

Good luck.
 
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