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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had my AT a year now and time for panniers to enable camp trips and actual adventures. Wondering if anyone has opinions on the ideal size of pannier bags? I like luxuries when camping ie beer, good food and furniture. I'm going Mosko and I figure better to have more capacity since you don't have to use it, but would the 30L bag on exhaust side stick out too far or mess up balance? And does anyone advocate the additional cost of the pocket bags as useful? I've got a 20L Kriega bag and a Nelson Rigg large zip bag that will come along as well if needed.. but mainly: is 80 liters enough space for you to camp or travel a few days?
(All this irrelevant side note personal stuff if anyone wants to chime in their own situations: I'm excited to use my backpack gear that hasn't been used in years due to work and family, and going motocamping with just friends and not tethered to the 3 dogs and gf. With our new work situation it'll be difficult to camp with her so it gives me the sweet excuse to begin this new phase of warm weather exploring. The thought of alternating nights between camping and motels seems ideal. I've always truck camped choosing sites to get away from people/ get dogs off leash but with moto camping it'll be about new roads and landscapes.)
 

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2023 Africa Twin 1100 manual (on backorder)
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Symmetrical rack because you can slap stuff behind it on the side that doesn't have the exhaust. I have a Rotopax with water on one side, comes in perfectly for cooking, washing and drinking. Some people also like putting a tool tube or something like that on the inside of the rack.

Running double OS32, even when filled beyond the brim it's minimally wider than the bars.

I wouldn't consider it enough for "luxuries", I also have two OS6 on the front crashbars and my backpack on the rear as you can see here. That said, my setup is based on "indefinite" trip length. I usually only carry 3 sets of clothing and 5 days worth of undies/socks, can wash them as required.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Symmetrical rack because you can slap stuff behind it on the side that doesn't have the exhaust. I have a Rotopax with water on one side, comes in perfectly for cooking, washing and drinking. Some people also like putting a tool tube or something like that on the inside of the rack.

Running double OS32, even when filled beyond the brim it's minimally wider than the bars.

I wouldn't consider it enough for "luxuries", I also have two OS6 on the front crashbars and my backpack on the rear as you can see here. That said, my setup is based on "indefinite" trip length. I usually only carry 3 sets of clothing and 5 days worth of undies/socks, can wash them as required.

View attachment 78748
Thanks for your insights and can't argue with your reasoning there and that's a sweet looking setup you have! I live in a beautiful part of Colorado so most of my rides are local short joy rides where I wish I didn't have the added weight/aerodynamics of pannier racks but heckin seems multiday trips aren't what these bikes are all about. Can't wait to experience the real deal. Operation find the right setup for now.
 

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Had my AT a year now and time for panniers to enable camp trips and actual adventures. Wondering if anyone has opinions on the ideal size of pannier bags?

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Great topic for discussion. I have the 35Ls on my AT and honestly wish they were 45s. Of course the bigger, the more crap you will cram in them. If Mosko made a 45, I’d want a 75!

My 35s do the job on 2-3 week trips but I still need a large top bag, and that can make it feel top heavy off road at slow speeds. I’d like more capacity in the panniers and a smaller, lighter, top bag. Pack your heavier items in the bottom of your panniers to keep the bulk of the weight low, and after a few trips you will begin to minimize your gear to what you actually need and use. I would suggest the larger size, having the extra room is better than not having it.

While on this topic, I modified the mounting of the Mosko on my 2017 AT. On the non exhaust sides they mounted too close to the bike and the passenger grab handles interfered with removing them. I only used one of their “pucks” to attach the bag to the bottom of the SW Motech detachable rack. I then drilled out the threads on an extra puck and used it as a spacer to give additional clearance for the bags. I showed this to the Mosko gang at the Overland Expo, and they liked the idea. This may not be an issue with newer model ATs or different racks, but it’s an easy solution if you have a similar issue. And the SW “detachable” racks are not really detachable due to them recommending the additional and included bracket for off road use.

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Exhaust side


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Non exhaust side with extra puck used as a spacer.
 

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2023 Africa Twin 1100 manual (on backorder)
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Thanks for your insights and can't argue with your reasoning there and that's a sweet looking setup you have! I live in a beautiful part of Colorado so most of my rides are local short joy rides where I wish I didn't have the added weight/aerodynamics of pannier racks but heckin seems multiday trips aren't what these bikes are all about. Can't wait to experience the real deal. Operation find the right setup for now.
Most racks are easy to remove, rackless options tend to require taping the side panels on the rear (or dealing with them scuffing up). For me the rear rack also works as another crash structure, keeps the exhaust and rear off the ground.

I generally don't have the passenger pegs mounted (they hurt when they bite your calves), which means a total of 6 bolts have to be loosened to remove the Outback Rack I have. Possibly an option in your case as it shouldn't take more than 15 minutes to rack up.

Another benefit of a tool tube type situation is that you could put your tentpoles in there as well; right now I have to stash everything inside the panniers.

That said, my usual carry is (keep in mind, my camping stuff is small/basic):
Sleeping mat, sleeping bag, inflatable pillow, camping chair, tent (all fits in one pannier)
The other pannier is basically cooking stuff (stove, gas cartridges, cooking pot, cutlery), clothing (nice set, everyday clothing, shoes, slippers), spare space for food/drink items.

Ditching the cooking stuff and more minimal clothing I easily have space for loads of beer, that's what my packing on a more casual ride with the boys looks like. If you're mainly riding and camping all you care about is clean socks and underwear anyways. If you're out with a few mates for a day or 2-3, you'll have enough from my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
View attachment 78756

Great topic for discussion. I have the 35Ls on my AT and honestly wish they were 45s. Of course the bigger, the more crap you will cram in them. If Mosko made a 45, I’d want a 75!

My 35s do the job on 2-3 week trips but I still need a large top bag, and that can make it feel top heavy off road at slow speeds. I’d like more capacity in the panniers and a smaller, lighter, top bag. Pack your heavier items in the bottom of your panniers to keep the bulk of the weight low, and after a few trips you will begin to minimize your gear to what you actually need and use. I would suggest the larger size, having the extra room is better than not having it.

While on this topic, I modified the mounting of the Mosko on my 2017 AT. On the non exhaust sides they mounted too close to the bike and the passenger grab handles interfered with removing them. I only used one of their “pucks” to attach the bag to the bottom of the SW Motech detachable rack. I then drilled out the threads on an extra puck and used it as a spacer to give additional clearance for the bags. I showed this to the Mosko gang at the Overland Expo, and they liked the idea. This may not be an issue with newer model ATs or different racks, but it’s an easy solution if you have a similar issue. And the SW “detachable” racks are not really detachable due to them recommending the additional and included bracket for off road use.

View attachment 78754
Exhaust side


View attachment 78759
Non exhaust side with extra puck used as a spacer.
Thanks for sharing your experience. Bigger is better you say. Mosko website FAQ answer says they personally go bigger since you can cinch it down to be symmetrical if wanted. That seems the ultimate reasoning there.. you get best of both worlds basically with the bigger option. I want beer, chair, 2 pillows, thick sleeping pad etc when camping & more grocery getting ability. I'm newish to motorcycles too so I'm not getting into difficult terrain yet on the AT (Kawasaki 250 for that) and wont be on single track much I'd guess when loaded up - point being the extra width shouldn't affect me yet. I've got a 2022 AT so we shall see if they figured out the spacing issue by now. Man I'm excited for this.
 

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Most racks are easy to remove, rackless options tend to require taping the side panels on the rear (or dealing with them scuffing up). For me the rear rack also works as another crash structure, keeps the exhaust and rear off the ground.

I generally don't have the passenger pegs mounted (they hurt when they bite your calves), which means a total of 6 bolts have to be loosened to remove the Outback Rack I have. Possibly an option in your case as it shouldn't take more than 15 minutes to rack up.

Another benefit of a tool tube type situation is that you could put your tentpoles in there as well; right now I have to stash everything inside the panniers.

That said, my usual carry is (keep in mind, my camping stuff is small/basic):
Sleeping mat, sleeping bag, inflatable pillow, camping chair, tent (all fits in one pannier)
The other pannier is basically cooking stuff (stove, gas cartridges, cooking pot, cutlery), clothing (nice set, everyday clothing, shoes, slippers), spare space for food/drink items.

Ditching the cooking stuff and more minimal clothing I easily have space for loads of beer, that's what my packing on a more casual ride with the boys looks like. If you're mainly riding and camping all you care about is clean socks and underwear anyways. If you're out with a few mates for a day or 2-3, you'll have enough from my experience.
... mmmmmm, ... beer.

Must feel good to crack a river-cold can after a day of solid Africa Twin riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Most racks are easy to remove, rackless options tend to require taping the side panels on the rear (or dealing with them scuffing up). For me the rear rack also works as another crash structure, keeps the exhaust and rear off the ground.

I generally don't have the passenger pegs mounted (they hurt when they bite your calves), which means a total of 6 bolts have to be loosened to remove the Outback Rack I have. Possibly an option in your case as it shouldn't take more than 15 minutes to rack up.

Another benefit of a tool tube type situation is that you could put your tentpoles in there as well; right now I have to stash everything inside the panniers.

That said, my usual carry is (keep in mind, my camping stuff is small/basic):
Sleeping mat, sleeping bag, inflatable pillow, camping chair, tent (all fits in one pannier)
The other pannier is basically cooking stuff (stove, gas cartridges, cooking pot, cutlery), clothing (nice set, everyday clothing, shoes, slippers), spare space for food/drink items.

Ditching the cooking stuff and more minimal clothing I easily have space for loads of beer, that's what my packing on a more casual ride with the boys looks like. If you're mainly riding and camping all you care about is clean socks and underwear anyways. If you're out with a few mates for a day or 2-3, you'll have enough from my experience.
I've got my heart set on the Mosko pannier set up now and leaning towards 30L+5L for both sides. Big bike deserves big luggage. Mosko pannier bars are asymmetrical and that's only option. But I got the one Kriega 20L bag for its easy lash-together design, maybe that will help accommodate the need to keep liquids and heavy crap centered and low.

On a side note, I've been looking at hammock camping lately. Gonna dabble with it since it seems to make sense for motocamping, depending on location. Going to try a test snooze in my backyard with my new cheap underquilt when it warms up to see if that should be pursued to maybe save weight and simplify. Or if possible bring tent and hammock to maximize camp spot locations and have options based on weather.

I hope I can pull off like a 4 night trip to Moab this spring after an initial more local test night out on the bike. My main riding buddy has a KTM500 Six Days and he's going rackless so it'll be cool to see the difference of the pros and cons of our opposite set ups.
 

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2023 Africa Twin 1100 manual (on backorder)
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I've got my heart set on the Mosko pannier set up now and leaning towards 30L+5L for both sides. Big bike deserves big luggage. Mosko pannier bars are asymmetrical and that's only option. But I got the one Kriega 20L bag for its easy lash-together design, maybe that will help accommodate the need to keep liquids and heavy crap centered and low.

On a side note, I've been looking at hammock camping lately. Gonna dabble with it since it seems to make sense for motocamping, depending on location. Going to try a test snooze in my backyard with my new cheap underquilt when it warms up to see if that should be pursued to maybe save weight and simplify. Or if possible bring tent and hammock to maximize camp spot locations and have options based on weather.

I hope I can pull off like a 4 night trip to Moab this spring after an initial more local test night out on the bike. My main riding buddy has a KTM500 Six Days and he's going rackless so it'll be cool to see the difference of the pros and cons of our opposite set ups.
You can get Mosko mounting plates for SW-motech and Outback racks, your options may be more diverse than you think.
 

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I've had the 25L Scouts, upgraded (may be tougher) to the 25L Backcountry. and have symmetrical racks. In the past, I've used 35L + bags and that's just too big. You'll still want a top bag and I like the Mosko Backcountry 40. You have as much or as little as you need in that, as long as it's light.

If you're interested, I don't have the listed here yet, but I have a Like New set of Outback Motortek racks for the '20+ AT. PM me if you're interested.

Hope that helps.
 
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