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I'm looking to purchase a new ATA - DCT. But, do have some questions (I haven't had one on a test ride yet) about how to handle it in situations where I'd normally use a clutch, to whit:

1) For slow speed on pavement, do you just use the rear brake to drop your speed? If I want to drop to a stop and try balancing the bike, not moving, is that all through the rear brake? When I stop does the bike shift to Neutral and then what happens if I try to apply a bit of throttle?

2) If I need to pop up the front wheel to get over a log, where I would have used clutch in the past, what do folks do?

3) On steep downhill where I would have turned the engine off, put the bike in 1st gear and used the clutch so that the rear acts as a brake, especially if I need my right foot out for balance, what do folks do?

4) Where I would have kept throttle up a bit and used the clutch to modulate power to the rear tire I'm assuming I now have to just use the throttle (and rear brake) and the bike won't complain.

Thanks.
 

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All control shifts to your right hand.
It stays in gear (1st) when you stop unless you put it into neutral.
Engine off, the clutch is disengaged.
Slow high RPM maneuvering is a no, you can get a bit of RPM’s by using the rear brake.
It doesn’t take much throttle off idle to get the bike moving..

 
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1. Either front or rear brake or both. The bike will take care of engaging/disengaging the clutch.

2. Drop down a gear or two manually with the button and hit the throttle.

3. I don’t know, I must ride too fast. 😁

4. Drag the rear brake a bit for slow speed maneuvering.
 

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If you watch the latest YouTube Drivemag Riders Africa Twin DCT versus Triumph Tiger review
,
it includes some useful stuff on the merits or otherwise of DCT off-road. I'm happy to give my clutch up for tarmac but the dinosaur in me will keep it for off-road. Of course this is just personal preference for us all!
 

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I'm looking to purchase a new ATA - DCT. But, do have some questions (I haven't had one on a test ride yet) about how to handle it in situations where I'd normally use a clutch, to whit:

1) For slow speed on pavement, do you just use the rear brake to drop your speed? If I want to drop to a stop and try balancing the bike, not moving, is that all through the rear brake? When I stop does the bike shift to Neutral and then what happens if I try to apply a bit of throttle?

The bike balances incredibly well slowly rolling with light rear brake, you can even blip the throttle to keep the momentum up

2) If I need to pop up the front wheel to get over a log, where I would have used clutch in the past, what do folks do?

Good luck

3) On steep downhill where I would have turned the engine off, put the bike in 1st gear and used the clutch so that the rear acts as a brake, especially if I need my right foot out for balance, what do folks do?

Again maybe too technical. I have no problems on anything that I feel a 500+ lb motorcycle should go. If you want to ride it like a 450 dirt bike it is not the same thing

4) Where I would have kept throttle up a bit and used the clutch to modulate power to the rear tire I'm assuming I now have to just use the throttle (and rear brake) and the bike won't complain.

Yes again very good throttle control, remember even thought the clutch his electronically actuated you still control it with rider inputs.



Thanks.
 

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Everyone's got personal techniques on motorcycle controls and operations off road. There ARE some general principles and applications. But, by and large, everyone rides differently. Different riding styles, different tires, different weights of both the rider and the bike, tire pressures, hill and grade angles, road conditions and a whoooooole lot more. Some are way more aggressive and therefore, will have to manipulate any and all controls at their discretion as to what's gonna work for any given application. While others, like me, who don't push either myself or the bike, to any form of limits.

So, what you've done by way of control of your bikes in the past, may very well have to be changed in riding the AT/AS/DCT. It's a pretty heavy machine, to say the least. Inertia plays a pretty big part in both road and off road operations. Top-heaviness is also a pretty important consideration. I'm not an aggressive off road rider. At 68, I'm not made out of rubber and don't bend that easy so, I need to be cautious when goofing around off road.

So my controlling of the bike in most of the situations you mentioned, is done purely out of caution and, I use what's available to me on my AT/AS/DCT. And, with all that being said, so far, I'm darned happy with with how well it works, especially in the totally automatic mode. If and when I feel I need maybe a tad more control, one push of the M button for MANUAL, I can now select whatever gear I want to cruise that particular part of the trail/road in. I can't praise this this bike enough. I'd buy another one in a heartbeat.
Scott
 

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Went out today to experiment with #3.

3. Front and rear brakes as needed. When you need the right foot down and the rear brake, use the parking brake hand lever.
 

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Went out today to experiment with #3.

3. Front and rear brakes as needed. When you need the right foot down and the rear brake, use the parking brake hand lever.
Be very aware that the parking brake is quite meager in capability and durability.
 

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Be very aware that the parking brake is quite meager in capability and durability.
That's kind-a what I was thinking too. Not to mention, at least on mine, you have to REALLY REACH with that left hand to grab hold of that lever. That to me, would be kind-of a hazard while trying to control 540 lbs. in less than perfect traction/terrain/soil conditions. Just my thoughts.

Scott
 

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If you watch the latest YouTube Drivemag Riders Africa Twin DCT versus Triumph Tiger review
,
it includes some useful stuff on the merits or otherwise of DCT off-road. I'm happy to give my clutch up for tarmac but the dinosaur in me will keep it for off-road. Of course this is just personal preference for us all!
After watching this comparison as well as reading other comparisons it seems that these riders did not really understand the DCT system very well nor had they ridden it enough to develop the changes to their riding technique to make it work for them. Sometimes it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

Dan
 

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After watching this comparison as well as reading other comparisons it seems that these riders did not really understand the DCT system very well nor had they ridden it enough to develop the changes to their riding technique to make it work for them. Sometimes it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

Dan
changing my mindset to dct took me 7-8e kms. not 2nd nature first. It takea time to learn low speed manouvers and using the dct modes. There are times when s2 is the best, when the manual is the best and there are many times when D is perfect (not fuel economy only). in the first six months i was close to sell it and i am glad i didn’t. Advanteges of the dct far outweigh its disadvantages in my opinion,
 

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changing my mindset to dct took me 7-8e kms. not 2nd nature first. It takea time to learn low speed manouvers and using the dct modes. There are times when s2 is the best, when the manual is the best and there are many times when D is perfect (not fuel economy only). in the first six months i was close to sell it and i am glad i didn’t. Advanteges of the dct far outweigh its disadvantages in my opinion,
Well,
It took me about 2 city blocks to make up my mind and confirm, the DCT is for me! So far, in the 7+ months I've owned it and, the 2,800 miles I've put on it, there is not one single item that would ever make me go back to a manual. I'm not a high spirited off road rider or, even on road for that matter. I just enjoy riding in both fields. And the DCT just makes it more pleasurable than it was in the first place.
Scott
 

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Well,
It took me about 2 city blocks to make up my mind and confirm, the DCT is for me! So far, in the 7+ months I've owned it and, the 2,800 miles I've put on it, there is not one single item that would ever make me go back to a manual. I'm not a high spirited off road rider or, even on road for that matter. I just enjoy riding in both fields. And the DCT just makes it more pleasurable than it was in the first place.
Scott
It’s more then capable of most off road slow technical stuff and I’ve had it up over 100mph on gravel roads and dirt trails..
Just in case you ever want to drive like a hoonigan....
 

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(for some reason my "eyes" filtered the statement a bit)
Excessive speed has taken me to shake hands with the grim reaper a few times, luck ( or some would say Divine intervention ) gave me the chance to decline deaths nice offer of a new permanent home...But that said; speed is still the one mistress I love to visit...
 

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The 2019 standard DCT is a fantastic machine, i find it excellent in the slow stuff too, the throttle is predictable & inspires confidence. Setting it to "gravel" mode traction control either off in sand, or at 1 on gravel with "G" mode active really works well for good control. Traction control is also fuel saving on long loose gravel stuff. I shall never EVER go back to manual.. A more relaxing ride especially on long trips.. This bike is a fantastic allrounder also to carry the misses for a casual countryside ride between the farms.. Enjoy !
 

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Excessive speed has taken me to shake hands with the grim reaper a few times, luck ( or some would say Devine intervention ) gave me the chance to decline deaths nice offer of a new permanent home...But that said; speed is still the one mistress I love to visit...
(y) Clearly, your work (and fun!) is not done yet in this life.
 

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Excessive speed has taken me to shake hands with the grim reaper a few times, luck ( or some would say Devine intervention ) gave me the chance to decline deaths nice offer of a new permanent home...But that said; speed is still the one mistress I love to visit...
Devine intervention?
58398
 

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