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Gang,
Ok, some of you have red that my two week old, 2018 AT/AS DCT decided to take a short nap, ON THE STREET as I made a U-turn but, hit tiny bit of sand/dirt on the side of the street almost all the way through the U-turn. Well it was on it's side, laying in the situation where the tank was facing down hill (the street has a decent grade). Once I stood up and was enduring some phenomenal embarrassment 'cause this was in the middle of the day, on a residential street with of course, EVERYONE home due to the virus etc. NOT GOOD!

Well, the mail man who, was about 30' away from this entertainment, and a nice, close by home owner and his little boy came to my aid. I'd tried to lift the AT and, at that time, in that position, there was no way for me to lift it. Thank God those nice folks jumped in and assisted me to get this big girl up-righted so I could try and regain my composure and mount the bike.

Now, ever since that happened, I've cruised the net to check for Fallen Africa Twins to see what maybe others have done in that kind of situation. Well, many of the dirt/adventure bike fall-overs don't apply to my application simply because, many of them have pannier boxes which, do not allow for the bike to fall COMPLETELY over. I specifically targeted the Africa Twin because of its weight and design.

The fact that the Twin, especially the ADVENTURE SPORTS model, is WEIGHT HIGH or, it's a TOP HEAVY bike, makes it more difficult to lift from a totally nap position than even some full dress Goldwings and Harely's because most of their weight is down low. In many youtube demo's, there appears to be a few different body ergonomics that are applied when lifting other type dirt/adventure bikes.

One is, get on your knees and put your chest against the seat, grab two places as low and tucked under the bike as you can, that will support you trying to right the bike and then, just push your chest against the seat while inching your way forward with your knees, wall the while lifting. Hmmmm, not sure about that one.

Another way is to bend over, with your butt against or, maybe just above the seat, grab the low side handle bar, and whatever else you can with your other hand and, keeping your back straight, using your legs, you can slowly lift that bike back to the righted position. Well, again, I'd have to lay this almost brand new bike back down, maybe even in the dirt since this most likely WHERE this potential mishap could happen, and try one or more of the techniques stated.

Then, there's the Eastbound Motowinch. That tool, which is carried in a small pouch, gets assembled and placed in the appropriate place with a ratchet mechanism and strap attached to the low side handlebar. You then start ratcheting and, the bike starts lifting. You keep ratcheting 'till that bike is at a lifted position, high enough for you to manually finish raising it to the point the stand can support it.

So, for those of you that have had the unfortunate experience of a fallen AT, and an Adventure Sports model at that, did you lift it yourself, and how did you do it? Oh by the way, to help with the dynamics and over all picture, what is your size, weight, age and physical status (how would you classify your strength?)? I'm 6' 2.5" and at present, about 242 lbs. I'm 67 years old and, consider myself pretty much OK in the strength department but, not overly strong.
Scott
 

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I’ve picked mine up twice, both times just grabbed the end of the bar, lol she is a heavy girl. Don’t think I’d wanna do it three times in a row..
5’-9” around 260# 53yrs
I guess, picture a much taller version of a Lord of the Rings dwarf, yes just as hairy too.
 
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I've had to pick mine up twice. First time was offroad and it fell with the top end into a bit of a ditch. End of the handlebar was buried in soft dirt and bush so I had a hard time getting my hand on it. Did manage to get the end of the bar free and then lifted it with both hands on the bar end. Last bit of the lift was the hardest, mainly due to where the bike fell. It also fell in my driveway (actually blew over when we had some extremely strong wind). Much easier in the driveway, lifted it no problem at all. Not something I'd want to do multiple times though.

I'm 5'9" and around 195 lbs. Not the strongest person, especially upper body, but I've always had strong legs which has helped in both lifts. Mine is a standard '17 AT. I'm sure lifting it would become easier with practice but who wants to be practicing that :rolleyes:
 

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I'll have to find some grass and put the AT to bed and document the process.

In regards to some heavy inline-4s, I have squatted, back upright, side rib cage firmly against the fuel tank/seat (don't wear anything hard or metallic), left wrist around the left handlebar, right hand on a frame member. Then slowly stand up without curling the back. If you can, put down the side stand if you have not already. I am not recommending it, but is something that worked for me.

I like the Cuch's video methods, but have not had to apply one yet.

6' 1 1/2", mid-fifties, love cheeseburgers.
 

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I'll have to find some grass and put the AT to bed and document the process.

In regards to some heavy inline-4s, I have squatted, back upright, side rib cage firmly against the fuel tank/seat (don't wear anything hard or metallic), left wrist around the left handlebar, right hand on a frame member. Then slowly stand up without curling the back. If you can, put down the side stand if you have not already. I am not recommending it, but is something that worked for me.

I like the Cuch's video methods, but have not had to apply one yet.

6' 1 1/2", mid-fifties, love cheeseburgers.

It works. This gal can do it, my wife can do it.


Brett also demonstrates a 2 person "monkey lift" method in this video...

 

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Discussion Starter #7
While I'm not happy to see and read that others have dropped their beloved Twin, it's good to know that you were able to get them back up without the use a mechanical device. And, as stated earlier, there appears there's alternate ways of lifting them with success. I hope mine NEVER goes down again. It was disheartening enough the first time. I've ate it a couple of times on my Yamaha TW200 in the outback. But, picking up a 275 lb. bike, 1/2 the size of a Twin, is just not that tough, especially for an old elephant like me. But, the Twin, well, let's just hope I don't have to experiment the alternative ways of righting it another time. I surely thank all of you for your advice and experience on a subject that, I'd bet none of us LIKE to talk about.
Scott
 

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While I'm not happy to see and read that others have dropped their beloved Twin, it's good to know that you were able to get them back up without the use a mechanical device. And, as stated earlier, there appears there's alternate ways of lifting them with success. I hope mine NEVER goes down again. It was disheartening enough the first time. I've ate it a couple of times on my Yamaha TW200 in the outback. But, picking up a 275 lb. bike, 1/2 the size of a Twin, is just not that tough, especially for an old elephant like me. But, the Twin, well, let's just hope I don't have to experiment the alternative ways of righting it another time. I surely thank all of you for your advice and experience on a subject that, I'd bet none of us LIKE to talk about.
Scott
Based on expressed Forum experiences, if one does a meaningful amount of offroad, one should plan for a nap. All other incidences are unexpected.
 

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Based on expressed Forum experiences, if one does a meaningful amount of offroad, one should plan for a nap. All other incidences are unexpected.
Yeah, when Sara and I took an off-road class, picking up the bike was one of the first things they taught us. The instructor laid down his 1200GS on its side and we all had a turn at picking it up. We had to do it for the Accident Scene Management classes as well. Its good to practice a few times with an observer, because I know the mistake I made was trying to use my back and I have a bad back.
 

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Yeah, when Sara and I took an off-road class, picking up the bike was one of the first things they taught us. The instructor laid down his 1200GS on its side and we all had a turn at picking it up. We had to do it for the Accident Scene Management classes as well. Its good to practice a few times with an observer, because I know the mistake I made was trying to use my back and I have a bad back.
Yes, you were saying some time ago. I think the course you refer to is a really good idea. I may have to consider something like that when the time comes.
 

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Wow to pick up a 500lb plus motorcycle, obviously it can be very difficult, especially in the dirt, mud , sand, uphill or down hill, it can be a bitch.
 

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My first drop was with the bike lying down hill, I could not lift it all the way up. I had to lift it a little and roll it in an arc that put it side-on to the slope and I was then able to pick it up.

With two people lifting it is about one tenth as hard as for one person on their own. You definitely warm up when you pick up a heavy bike on your own!
 

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Dropped mine in my driveway three days after getting it. Did the ol' butt against the seat to lift it. Pride was very hurt but otherwise all was ok. Never had to pick it up any other way but the way I used that time worked great. I'm 6'0" 240 and pretty stout but I've also had two back surgeries and two knee surgeries so I don't look forward picking it up in sand/dirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Dropped mine in my driveway three days after getting it. Did the ol' butt against the seat to lift it. Pride was very hurt but otherwise all was ok. Never had to pick it up any other way but the way I used that time worked great. I'm 6'0" 240 and pretty stout but I've also had two back surgeries and two knee surgeries so I don't look forward picking it up in sand/dirt.
Yes Sir, I do feel for you and your Pride. To purchase a new bike, and especially the AT, only to have it fall over ONLY THREE DAYS into ownership, AND, in your own driveway, man, that had to hurt the feelings. But, I'm gaining confidence in the fact that so many, for whatever reason, have had to upright their Twin and, have done it with their own body. Whatever technique is used, as long as you're not hurting yourself, I applaud you. I dread the day it might happen again to me.
Scott
 

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Mentioned in an earlier thread about my twin taking a nap in the deep sand. I could not pick it up, without assistance. Had to use a ratchet strap anchored to an SUV (while wife watched in amusement.)

Had an "incident" in the garage a while back. Had been fooling with the height of the front forks on the center stand. Had a couple of rubber chocks in front and back of the front wheel to make dialing in the fork height in the triple clamps easier. Finished adjustments, kicked chocks to the side, and got astride to bump it off the center-stand.

Apparently did not kick one chock far enough away. Came off center-stand, left front disc rotor landed on chock, pushed/tilted over to right. I was caught by surprise and couldn't catch it, so down in the garage.

Heed Bunker bars and soft bags, so no damage, and I was able to pick it up off the garage floor with the backwards butt lift technique. (Could not get the traction to make that work in the sand.)

I'm 59, 5'6", 170 lbs and not exactly athletic. Your basic executive desk jockey.
 

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Based on expressed Forum experiences, if one does a meaningful amount of offroad, one should plan for a nap. All other incidences are unexpected.
I nearly croked trying to pick the hog leg up. It did not help that the thing was in greasy muck and I'm covered in it! B atch,first stop was a car wash. 56 yrs, 220# 6' man dedicated to a crash free world. Ps. Ol Doublethump explained the proper method!
20181124_155451.jpg
 

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I've had to pick mine up, um.....multiple times. I use the butt against the seat method mostly. If it isn't laying totally flat I may use the turn the front wheel to the sky and lift the handlebar end. I've never had to pick it up with good footing, that'd make it easier.
The hardest one was when it fell asleep going up a steep, loose, rocky hill climb (4-low in the truck). It wasn't faced in a safe direction to lift it, or to head back down the hill. The scraping sounds as I drug the front end around were sickening. No damage, the Heed bars have done very good at keeping the bike from getting hurt.
I am a gray haired 5'10" 170 lbs.
 

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I've had to pick mine up, um.....multiple times. I use the butt against the seat method mostly. If it isn't laying totally flat I may use the turn the front wheel to the sky and lift the handlebar end. I've never had to pick it up with good footing, that'd make it easier.
The hardest one was when it fell asleep going up a steep, loose, rocky hill climb (4-low in the truck). It wasn't faced in a safe direction to lift it, or to head back down the hill. The scraping sounds as I drug the front end around were sickening. No damage, the Heed bars have done very good at keeping the bike from getting hurt.
I am a gray haired 5'10" 170 lbs.
Sounds fun! I too seem to find the worst place to biff.Guessing that's why it happens and i lived to see another day,a thousand miles from nowhere! That's the plan anyway. Beware of ground magnates,they will bite you😅
 
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