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Discussion Starter #21
Right on Rubicon! Testing limits is how you grow.馃槈
Personally,
I'd rather not test those limits, if possible. :unsure: But, sometimes, as Forest Gump's T-shirt read, Sh... happens!
Scott
 

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Wow to pick up a 500lb plus motorcycle, obviously it can be very difficult, especially in the dirt, mud , sand, uphill or down hill, it can be a bitch.
Not so. It is easy with the appropriate technique.
Don't be afraid to scratch the he11 out of your bike dragging it around so the wheels are downhill though.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
If there is a solid object near by? Always, carry a wench? i wipe me own bumm! Gotta get home. Why ride an adventure bike and not go on an adventure? It's really fun!
" i wipe me own bumm!"??????
Scott
 

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I have no problem picking mine up. Did it in the mud on an incline on saturday. But I'm 6'1 #250.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I have no problem picking mine up. Did it in the mud on an incline on saturday. But I'm 6'1 #250.
Well,
This is why I created the thread. I'd like to know how many have had to up-right their Twin ON THEIR OWN, in any given situation. You don't say what method you use(d). I still consider myself at least somewhat strong, even at 67 years old. But, as stated in a few threads, mine fell over while making a U-turn and hit some sand/dirt on the edge of the pavement and the road was slanted down hill. The bike fell with the tank facing downhill. While trying to recover from a seriously stupid mistake, I tried briefly to lift it and, at that time, in that position, with the bike leaning down hill, it just wasn't gonna happen. I definitely needed help in that particular set of circumstances.

I may do some experimentation at a later date, to lay it over and see if I can actually use any of the proven methods to stand it up, by myself.
Scott
 

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Mine has been down at least a dozen times over 20k miles. Each situation has been different... terrain, surfaces, load. After the first couple of times, I don't fight it any more. I just shoot not to be under it, position it better if possible.

I've looked at all the videos and techniques and think every one has an advantage in certain circumstances. The backwards way has never worked well for me however. On my knees using the handlebar seems to the one I'm most successful with.

99% of my rides are solo and when I get to the point I can't pick it up, I'll be getting another bike. Spinning the bike around, finding logs, helmet, anything to wedge under to change angles can help.
 

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Well,
This is why I created the thread. I'd like to know how many have had to up-right their Twin ON THEIR OWN, in any given situation. You don't say what method you use(d). I still consider myself at least somewhat strong, even at 67 years old. But, as stated in a few threads, mine fell over while making a U-turn and hit some sand/dirt on the edge of the pavement and the road was slanted down hill. The bike fell with the tank facing downhill. While trying to recover from a seriously stupid mistake, I tried briefly to lift it and, at that time, in that position, with the bike leaning down hill, it just wasn't gonna happen. I definitely needed help in that particular set of circumstances.

I may do some experimentation at a later date, to lay it over and see if I can actually use any of the proven methods to stand it up, by myself.
Scott
Yep I've done it multiple ways. Saturday was on a muddy trail. I was going uphill and there was a root under the mud. The rear tire kicked to the left and I went down on the right side. I stood on the right side, grabbed the right grip and rear grab handle and shoved my feet against the rut, and did a reverse monkey lift by pushing the bike up with my stomach on the seat. It was pretty easy. I've also done the sit on the seat lift. It's much easier with two people though. I was solo this last time. I've probably dropped mine over 20 times on trails and in parking lots for various reasons. The most embarrassing was after gassing up and I went to park my bike to pay. I parked, put my right foot down to put my side stand down, slipped on an oil slick and ended up knocking my buddies bike over as I fell and was stuck under my bike. There was no solo option that time...
 

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Well,
This is why I created the thread. I'd like to know how many have had to up-right their Twin ON THEIR OWN, in any given situation. You don't say what method you use(d). I still consider myself at least somewhat strong, even at 67 years old. But, as stated in a few threads, mine fell over while making a U-turn and hit some sand/dirt on the edge of the pavement and the road was slanted down hill. The bike fell with the tank facing downhill. While trying to recover from a seriously stupid mistake, I tried briefly to lift it and, at that time, in that position, with the bike leaning down hill, it just wasn't gonna happen. I definitely needed help in that particular set of circumstances.

I may do some experimentation at a later date, to lay it over and see if I can actually use any of the proven methods to stand it up, by myself.
Scott
All about leverage. I have been there many times. With dirt bikes,we would drag the back or front to a better angle,so as to make physics our friend! Also,after crashing there is adrenalin loaded panic! Turn ignition off and catch your breathe. It helps!
In most cases the technique described by Doublethumper is the best known method.Glad to know people are finding trouble on a motorbike,that's what its all about! And getting home馃槈
Peace to all !
 

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All about leverage. I have been there many times. With dirt bikes,we would drag the back or front to a better angle,so as to make physics our friend! Also,after crashing there is adrenalin loaded panic! Turn ignition off and catch your breathe. It helps!
In most cases the technique described by Doublethumper is the best known method.Glad to know people are finding trouble on a motorbike,that's what its all about! And getting home馃槈
Peace to all !
Forgot, take pictures馃榿
 

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Dropped mine on the MABDR by myself. Came in to a switchback corner a little too hot I guess and the surface under the fall leaves had changed in the corner and there were baseball sized rocks everywhere. The front tire got on top of one and stepped out on me. It started to tip and I couldn't get good footing so I just let it go. I've learned not to fight it if it's too far over. Bike was ok for the most part. Nothing broken. Stood back and looked at it for a moment then removed the top case and just picked it up. Came up surprisingly easy. I thought it would be much more difficult. I even took some pictures.

54829


54830
 

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Ride365 makes a great point which hasn't gotten much traction in this thread. Remove as much weight from the bike as needed to get you over the I-can-do-this hump regardless of your method. Weight higher up on the bike comes off first. Know that a pound in your tank bag is as hard to lift as 2 pounds in your pannier so drop your top trunk, your tank bag and anything strapped to your rear seat first. High-side pannier next.

I just dropped my AT in the garage yesterday. I was trying to get her up on the center stand in flip flops (this IS Florida) to adjust the chain tension and hadn't cleared the work area completely. My footwork was interrupted by a large torque wrench and she started to lean away and I slowly lost my purchase. She went over in very slow motion onto a couple of bags filled with clothes for the Salvation Army. Absolutely zero damage to anything but my pride. The work area was so confined that I couldn't get the leverage needed to pull her back up alone. I had to swallow what remained and go into the house to ask my daughter and wife to come help, adding insult to injury. But up she came so all's well that ends well.
 

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Dropped mine on the MABDR by myself. Came in to a switchback corner a little too hot I guess and the surface under the fall leaves had changed in the corner and there were baseball sized rocks everywhere.
...
Those **** leaves can be treacherous...especially if they're damp.
 

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Absolutely zero damage to anything but my pride. The work area was so confined that I couldn't get the leverage needed to pull her back up alone. I had to swallow what remained and go into the house to ask my daughter and wife to come help. This just added insult to injury. But up she came so all's well that ends well.
Reminds me of a friend mentioning an incident his uncle got into. This would have been in the early 1950s The aunt didn't like motorcycles to begin with. The uncle had a large Indian. He went drinking with the guys one night and had too much. He lost his balance as he kicked the engine over. The bike tipped over landing on top of him. Hi buddies stood the bike up, started it, placed him on it and sent him home. Over morning coffee the aunt looking at her husband noticed the new scrapes and bruises. Of course she asked what happened. The uncle, unwilling to admit the full story, just said he had a scuffle with a big Indian and left it at that. It probably did not take long for her to get all the details through the grapevine.

I can't say I am much better. When my AT tipped over in the garage, I got the neighbour to help me and only let my wife know what happened after making sure the bike was okay.
 
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