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One thing that helped me was being told to grab the top grab rail when the bike is lying flat. Bike behind you, butt above the seat, get the lower handlebar and top passenger grab rail. Get it up some, then you can grab the lower rail and finish the lift. I have laid it down in the grass in my front yard and tried different ways. I am 50 yrs old 5' 8" and 155lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
One thing that helped me was being told to grab the top grab rail when the bike is lying flat. Bike behind you, butt above the seat, get the lower handlebar and top passenger grab rail. Get it up some, then you can grab the lower rail and finish the lift. I have laid it down in the grass in my front yard and tried different ways. I am 50 yrs old 5' 8" and 155lbs.
Phillip,
Now that, seems like some good common sense. In your method, you're at least not starting at TWO low points of grab. If you can start at least at one slightly higher lifting point, you'd have better ergonomics. I also think that the success of a lifting method, has many variables. Things like how tall a person is, their weight, basic strength etc. Then, switch to the lower lifting point, to finish the lift, NOT BAD Sir, not bad at all. My son and son-in-law are both coming over tomorrow. Both are younger and are quite capable. I think I'll have them lower the bike and we'll do some testing while the two gorillas are there to help. Thanks for the tip.
Scott
 

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Yea like I said before....
She’s like dancing with a fat girl in stiletto’s, she’s exceptionally well balanced and dances beautifully but dip her to far and there will be helll to pay.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
Well Gang,
Here's the latest. Today was/is Mom's Day and, after all the festivities settled down, I grabbed both gorillas, (son and son-in-law) and we rolled the AT out to the fake lawn and, let her take a short nap on the nice, pleasant fake grass. The terrain has a slight degree of slant. We laid the bike down so the tank was facing uphill, slightly but, none the less, uphill. Well, first my son did the butt lift and, while he did strain some, he got it up without too many veins popping out of his neck.

Then, my son-in-law, did the face to the bike method and sort of muscled it up, and used his legs, just facing the bike, not away from it. He too got it up, (THE BIKE!) and, SOME vein popping. We laid it back down again.. Now, my turn. Well, the old man, did manage to get the big girl up but, I gotta tell ya, it wasn't without some pretty serious reserve's , called in (another words, all the muscles I could call for help in my own body) that I finally got it up too. Now, even though that effort did produce the desired results of the big girl standing, these were optimum conditions.

Then, we turned the big girl around and laid with the tank facing DOWNHILL. Again, a very slight downhill but, down hill. My son tried it first. He got it up again, but, with considerably more effort. Then, once again, my son-in-law tried. NOPE, not gonna happen. He knew it was taxing him from the git-go. I tried, nope, not happening. Soooooo, we alllllllll stood it up and rolled it back into the garage.

The conclusion, this was an optimum conditions test. And I didn't do so good. So, to those of you that have won the battle of the napping twin, and succeeded in lifting it as many times as you have, I commend you. It looks like, at least for me, I'm gonna have to carry one of the available mechanical advantage toys that you remove from a bag, put it together and, attach it to the bike in the appropriate manor and, start ratcheting. The bike slowly awakens from its nap and, approaches the vertical position.

Oh well, if this approach is what I think I need, so be it. Sometimes, ya gotta do what ya gotta do. At least I'll be able to ride with at least some assurance if nap time came, and I was alone, I could wake her up and continue on.
Scott
 

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I would say that if there was that much vein-popping, the issue might be body position. Its all in the legs and sometimes with the big adventure bikes, if you have panniers and stuff you have to do some re-adjusting. If done correctly, it doesn't take a gorilla...


But that said, the best way to pick up the bike is the one that makes you feel most comfortable. Absolutely nothing wrong with using the mechanical aids if you don't mind packing one and you are more comfortable with their use.

The only important thing is that you get her back up again :)
 

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The AT is a horse, the R1200GS a cow :)
It is interesting you mention that. I had the AT out today for its Sunday exercise in rural Ontario, and of course totally enjoyed it. The one thing I noticed (being my first real ADV bike) is I can stand-up and ride all day on the AT (except on freeways). The tank is so well sculpted that it is trivial to lean slightly forward and sleep standing up as the mill below plods along. It feels truly enlightening.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I didn't see an AT in any of those videos.











Just kiddin'. Well done demonstrations.
EXACTLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
An AT/AS DCT unit hovers real close to 550 lbs. And, if you have panniers or anything else that prevents a fall to the COMPLETE laid over position, then you don't have to lift nearly as far. Yes, we know all about the proper ergonomics and body physics in lifting. But, with a full tank of 6.3 gallons of gas, and other componentry that is higher, one is lifting quite a bit in lifting an A/T A/S DCT. I have no idea what any other Adventure bike weighs.

In order for legs to even begin to do the larger part of lifting, they MUST be at least somewhat straightened for the muscles to do the work. But, when an AT is ALL THE WAY ON ITS SIDE, as in the tank is almost touching the ground, again, you're trying to lift quite a bit right from a few inches off the ground. Now, put that AT/AS in a downhill laid down position, (tank facing downhill), gravity is even playing a larger part.

Folks, again, as stated, I applaud any and all who can lift their AT's, especially the AS DCT versions, from a full nap position, all on their own. In my younger and more vibrant years, I might have had what it takes to lift this beast no matter what set of conditions were presented with the nap. But now, at my present age, well, ain't happening. My legs are still actually pretty strong. But, like stated, if at the beginning of lift, they're still kinked up due to the bike being so low, then they cannot help until the bike is up somewhat.

There are some that might say: "Well, if you can't lift it, should it fall, then you shouldn't be riding it". Well, it's their choice to have that opinion. I'll just have to cope with a dirt nap in a way that works for me. Thanks for all who've responded.
Scott
 

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...
There are some that might say: "Well, if you can't lift it, should it fall, then you shouldn't be riding it". Well, it's their choice to have that opinion. I'll just have to cope with a dirt nap in a way that works for me. Thanks for all who've responded.
Scott
I can't imagine how some riders of Gold Wings deal with a napping situation. Yet, ride they do.

Yeah, the AT does appear to nap pretty hard. I have lifted a downed bike - seat facing downhill - and leg/ankle trapped. It ain't fun. I can see the AT being stubborn when napping seat first downhill.
 

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Discussion Starter #57 (Edited)
I can't imagine how some riders of Gold Wings deal with a napping situation. Yet, ride they do.

Yeah, the AT does appear to nap pretty hard. I have lifted a downed bike - seat facing downhill - and leg/ankle trapped. It ain't fun. I can see the AT being stubborn when napping seat first downhill.
DT,
Very, very similar to a pannier equipped AT, when a Goldwing (or Harley or any other full touring monster) goes down, they only fall to about, a 40-45 degree angle due to the side boxes and protection crash bars, very close to the passengers foot pegs. In fact, if you do about a minutes research on the changing or repairing a rear tire on a GL 1800 Goldwing on youtube, you'd see that there's quite a few that actually tip the Wing over on its right side, to remove that rear tire/wheel.

So, when a Wing falls or, is lowered to the point the rear crash bars take the weight, yes, it's difficult to get it righted again but, you're not lifting it from the full, flat on the ground, on its side position. And, when the Wing is already at a 45 degree position, your legs/knees are not kinked as much, and you can, yes even women, get some full strength from their/your legs to begin to lift it up, the rest of the way.

Of course, the smartest thing a person can do is RIDE WITH TWO OR MORE PEOPLE when having fun. Then, it's obvious that, the more the merrier when it comes to wake an AT from it's nap. But, at least for me, riding partners are few and far between where I live.
Scott

P.S. I just reviewed the videos again and, I don't know what the first bike is, other than it's a Beemer. It appears to be possibly a smaller Adventure bike but, I'm no expert. The remaining bikes do not fall all the way over, to the point the tank is close to the earth. The other Beemers and Pannier equipped bikes prevent the bike from falling completely. That means, that young lady doesn't have to lift as far but, still has to lift some, to get them up. She did a good job, no doubt about it. But, I'd like to her lift mine, with a full tank of fuel, and all the way over to the point the tank is only a few inches away from the ground.
Scott
 

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P.S. I just reviewed the videos again and, I don't know what the first bike is, other than it's a Beemer. It appears to be possibly a smaller Adventure bike but, I'm no expert. The remaining bikes do not fall all the way over, to the point the tank is close to the earth. The other Beemers and Pannier equipped bikes prevent the bike from falling completely. That means, that young lady doesn't have to lift as far but, still has to lift some, to get them up. She did a good job, no doubt about it. But, I'd like to her lift mine, with a full tank of fuel, and all the way over to the point the tank is only a few inches away from the ground.
Scott
FWIW, that first bike is a 310GS, those weight just under 400#

The other three are all 1200gs’s and those are just under 600lbs.
 

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First bikes are BMW R1250GS and F850GS. Brett Tkacs bike in the video is a BMW R1200GS. The one being picked up by the middle aged women at the end is a BMW R1150GS.

The video posted by JB882 are all various BMW GS's. The first being the 310 and I believe mostly R1200GS and one R1150GS, but I didn't watch it closely.

The Harley I honestly don't know. Fat Boy?

With the exception of the 310GS and F850GS, they should all be in the ballpark of the AT/ATAS. They are fair representative videos.

That said....



Real-world conditions...


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