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Actually the 850GS is up over 500#, the 850 GS adventure is 540 which is no different than my ATAS 6 speed.
I knew the F800GS was sub-500 at about 460lbs wet. My wife had one prior to her AT. I hadn't realized the 850GS bulked up so much. :)



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I knew the F800GS was sub-500 at about 460lbs wet. My wife had one prior to her AT. I hadn't realized the 850GS bulked up so much. :)



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They sure have. The 850GS is really almost an apples to apples comparison to the Africa Twin. The adventure model almost matches it spec for spec. A little less power and torque but close and similar size and weight.
 

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Yamaha XT 1200Z Super Ténéré is about 580lbs wet, R1200GSA about 600lbs. They are all a bit portly :)

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Discussion Starter #64
Well Gang,
After much self deliberation and consultation, AND, asking for all of your experience and advice, I finally decided that I'm just not what I used to be. In that, I'm not as strong and as much of a Bull as I used to be and, may, or MAY NOT be able to pick up the 550 lb. AT if it's decided to take a nap, either on the street or, in the outback some place. So, I decided to order up, the Eastbound Motowinch. For those that have one or, those that have investigated one, you know what I'm talking about. This tool, is made in the Netherlands. That's kind-a far away from where I live in Lake Havasu City AZ. It is a very, very well machined and precise fit, in all it's components and pieces.

I ordered it on Tuesday the 12th and, it arrived FROM THE NETHERLANDS, on my doorstep today, the 15th!!!!!!!!!! This Motowinch is simply a mechanical advantage tool, that basically WINCHES your bike up via a single pole, that is put together at the scene of the incident. Now, as many of you have presented, you DO have the ability to lift your napping AT. I think that's great. I did accomplish the lifting of mine, under controlled circumstances but, when it was laid down in such a manor that the tank was facing downhill, there was/is, no way I can lift it. So, this Motowinch, hopefully, is gonna be my RESCUE tool, in the event I can't lift it. If that big girl decides to take a nap, I might give it the old college try but, I ain't gonna hurt myself. I'll break out that motowinch tool and, take the easier route.

This will give me at least some form of piece of mind, when I venture off on some nice road/trail and, hopefully I keep it upright but, again, if it gets sleepy, I'm at least as prepared as I can be.
Scott
 

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I've dropped mine twice, both from a standstill and both my fault.

I found despite it being a hefty lump it was fairly easy to pick up by squatting and using the rear grab handles and handle bars (although I too am a hefty lump which helps). I think the low centre of gravity helps with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
I've dropped mine twice, both from a standstill and both my fault.

I found despite it being a hefty lump it was fairly easy to pick up by squatting and using the rear grab handles and handle bars (although I too am a hefty lump which helps). I think the low centre of gravity helps with it.
Yes Sir,
I agree with your thought process but, at least for me and my AT, when it fell, and when we (my son, son-in-law and myself) lowered it for test lifts, the lifting points, as in lowest handle bar and rear grab handle, were so low that, my legs were completely folded and I could not, no matter how many attempts were made, get any strength out of them due to that angle. Once the bike is up to say, oh, maybe a 30+ degree angle from the ground, THEN the leg muscles take over and I can lift it. But, to get it to that point is the critical part. So, for me, the motowinch is the answer. Just my choice. Others can get back on the trail/street in a matter of a minute or so 'cause they can lift their sleeping AT's. Well, if it takes me 10 minutes or so, to get it out, un package it, assemble it, and use it, to get that big girl back up, then repackage it and put it away, oh well, at least I'd still be able to ride.
Scott
 

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I see what you mean, perhaps my top box (a give 56 litre) gave it enough height when it landed to make things easier for me. I think the moto winch is a great idea - picking up the bike on tarmac is a whole lot easier than on a trail or gravel/mud etc. (y)
 

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Yes Sir,
I agree with your thought process but, at least for me and my AT, when it fell, and when we (my son, son-in-law and myself) lowered it for test lifts, the lifting points, as in lowest handle bar and rear grab handle, were so low that, my legs were completely folded and I could not, no matter how many attempts were made, get any strength out of them due to that angle. Once the bike is up to say, oh, maybe a 30+ degree angle from the ground, THEN the leg muscles take over and I can lift it. But, to get it to that point is the critical part. So, for me, the motowinch is the answer. Just my choice. Others can get back on the trail/street in a matter of a minute or so 'cause they can lift their sleeping AT's. Well, if it takes me 10 minutes or so, to get it out, un package it, assemble it, and use it, to get that big girl back up, then repackage it and put it away, oh well, at least I'd still be able to ride.
Scott
Remember to store the Motowinch in an area where you can reach it if you happen to need it when the AT decides to nap with you under.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Remember to store the Motowinch in an area where you can reach it if you happen to need it when the AT decides to nap with you under.
Yessireee Bub, that's the plan. Right now, it's in the top box but, it takes up about 1/2 of it. That's not a big deal 'cause, at present, I'm not hauling all kinds of crap anyways like I had in the Wing. I was thinking of fabricating some sort of tight cradle for under the top box but, due to the thickness of that motowinch bag, it almost blocks my tail light, NOT GOOD!

So, it's in the top box for now. And that makes it accessible no matter what side the big girl decides to sleep on.
Scott
 

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My back has told me it would prefer if I didn't lift it on my own any more. With a full tank of fuel it's another 18 kgs to lift a long way. This has taught me: 1. Don't carry two much fuel when doing anything challenging. 2. Don't drop the thing. 3. If it does go down, seek help lifting it (look for someone stronger in the arm than in the head). 4. If all else fails, I use a tool I made that consists 28mm copper tube section and a ratchet strap.

You fit and strong youngsters will laugh at me. One day in the distant future, the invoice will arrive for the way you've treated your one and only body. By then it's too late. That's why us old sods look for a strong youngster in times of need and delegate.
 

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The lady lifting the AT was impressive. One of things that makes this Bike sometimes harder than others is because it can be impossible to get the bike to transfer it’s weight to the load bearing parts like the tires. Especially if it is tipped with seat facing down hill. If you have to lift it to get the weight onto the tires you are lifting much more of the weight rather than transferring the weight to the tires. Spin the bike 180 so the seat is uphill helps. The long travel suspension works against you because until you hit sag you are still the weight bearing member. Don’t let the tires slip or hang in the air or you will never get it.


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Discussion Starter #74
The lady lifting the AT was impressive. One of things that makes this Bike sometimes harder than others is because it can be impossible to get the bike to transfer it’s weight to the load bearing parts like the tires. Especially if it is tipped with seat facing down hill. If you have to lift it to get the weight onto the tires you are lifting much more of the weight rather than transferring the weight to the tires. Spin the bike 180 so the seat is uphill helps. The long travel suspension works against you because until you hit sag you are still the weight bearing member. Don’t let the tires slip or hang in the air or you will never get it.


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You are pretty accurate in your statement. But, I'm different than many folks. I prefer not to spin my bike to get it where the seat/tank is facing up hill. This is why I purchased the Eastbound motowinch. Yep, it will take me a minute or two to set it up and, it's about another what, maybe 4-5 lbs. more to carry. But, for that mechanism to do ALL the lifting, to me, well, is worth the pitfalls of the added weight of carrying it. Soon as I get around to it, I'll make my own little video of a test run with it.
Scott
 

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My thoughts...
Simple GET a lifting aid and a small loop strap..AND KEEP IT IN YOUR TOP BOX ( in reach )
quite simply it is insurance; AND better still a guarantee.
that no matter what the situation you will be able to get the bike back up right.
Laying on a muddy trail with your leg under the bike.
Downside on a steep hill.
Close to trees and other natural obstacles that don’t allow you to get a good hold on the bike.
There are a million + scenarios out there where it could be hard or next to impossible for us to lift the bike, even if you have no issues lifting it by yourself..
Great if you never need it, but that time you do it will be worth a hundred times the amount you spent on it.
 

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I agree. Don’t get me wrong on that. I actually have the dirt napper from Keith products. I’ve been in some tough situations myself.


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