Honda Africa Twin Forum banner

121 - 140 of 150 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
I came across this flick regarding picking up an ADV bike. This bike happens to be a BMW GS, however, the method may still be salvageable. Take a look starting around 1:35 ...

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter #123
I came across this flick regarding picking up an ADV bike. This bike happens to be a BMW GS, however, the method may still be salvageable. Take a look starting around 1:35 ...

The only problem with that video, just like many Beemer vids of the same topic, due to the fact that the Beemer only falls to a 45 degree angle, the rider, almost no matter how small or short he or she is, can pretty much EASILY pick it back up because it's only fallen PART WAY. When you have an AT/AS/DCT, with a full tank, with the tank facing down hill, that's a WHOLE 'NOTHER STORY. Without a doubt, as much as I still regard myself as part man, part elephant, I have grown weaker in my 68 years (just had a birthday a few days ago). So, picking up a full tank, AT/AS laying completely down, even past horizontal down hill, is a tough project for me. Thanks for the video.
Scott
 
  • Like
Reactions: TwinWrangler

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
The only problem with that video, just like many Beemer vids of the same topic, due to the fact that the Beemer only falls to a 45 degree angle, the rider, almost no matter how small or short he or she is, can pretty much EASILY pick it back up because it's only fallen PART WAY. When you have an AT/AS/DCT, with a full tank, with the tank facing down hill, that's a WHOLE 'NOTHER STORY. Without a doubt, as much as I still regard myself as part man, part elephant, I have grown weaker in my 68 years (just had a birthday a few days ago). So, picking up a full tank, AT/AS laying completely down, even past horizontal down hill, is a tough project for me. Thanks for the video.
Scott
Yeah, totally aware. There maybe aspects that are salvageable or opportunities to some folks where this might be an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
The various methods have been documented but a couple of extra points:

1) If seat of the bike is downhilll from the engine, you need to try to turn the bike around (yup, this may scratch it a bit) so that the seat is uphill. This will make a BIG difference.

2) For the AT, think of it as a 2 stage process. Stage one is to get it hoisted enough so that both wheels are touching the ground. Stage two is the final hoist process.

3) You are NOT "lifting" the bike. Get rid of that thought. You are pushing at 90 degrees to the bike, across it. That means, that at the very start (when it is off the wheels), you are pushing the bike both "up" and towards the wheels until the wheels are on the ground. Then you are pushing at more of a 45 degree angle against the seat and as the bike comes up, your angle gets more and more obtuse till near the top you are pushing at just about a horizontal angle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter #129
The various methods have been documented but a couple of extra points:

1) If seat of the bike is downhilll from the engine, you need to try to turn the bike around (yup, this may scratch it a bit) so that the seat is uphill. This will make a BIG difference.

2) For the AT, think of it as a 2 stage process. Stage one is to get it hoisted enough so that both wheels are touching the ground. Stage two is the final hoist process.

3) You are NOT "lifting" the bike. Get rid of that thought. You are pushing at 90 degrees to the bike, across it. That means, that at the very start (when it is off the wheels), you are pushing the bike both "up" and towards the wheels until the wheels are on the ground. Then you are pushing at more of a 45 degree angle against the seat and as the bike comes up, your angle gets more and more obtuse till near the top you are pushing at just about a horizontal angle.
Pretty darn good description of the dynamics of lifting a napping A/T. In my prime, oh, about 300-400 years ago, I could leg press around 390 lbs. The muscles in my legs were quite developed due to me being quite active in paper routes, general bicycle riding, running, and more. My upper body strength was not too bad also. But, that was waaaaaaaaay back a long time ago. While my size is still the same, the inner structure of my body, namely muscles, from not being tested on a regular basis, have subsided to just moving this large body from place to place. Needless to say, I'm not nearly as strong as I used to be.

With all that being said, many of you are still far more active than I am, even in older years. Hence, you still have what it takes to lift a napping A/T, even from a below the horizontal line. I still have some OK strength but, its really only applicable in advantage points. But, when the A/T is BELOW that advantage, as in totally laying on its side, DOWN HILL, that means my BEST capability to lift it, is not there. But, if my A/T had pannier bags/boxes, then the A/T would fall to only around a 30-45 degree angle.

When the bike is sitting (or laying) at that angle, then my best lifting advantage, is applicable. But, below that, I just don't have it anymore, like I used to. I applaud anyone who can lift that big girl, especially if it is laying with the tank facing downhill.
Scott
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
Pretty darn good description of the dynamics of lifting a napping A/T. In my prime, oh, about 300-400 years ago, I could leg press around 390 lbs. The muscles in my legs were quite developed due to me being quite active in paper routes, general bicycle riding, running, and more. My upper body strength was not too bad also. But, that was waaaaaaaaay back a long time ago. While my size is still the same, the inner structure of my body, namely muscles, from not being tested on a regular basis, have subsided to just moving this large body from place to place. Needless to say, I'm not nearly as strong as I used to be.

With all that being said, many of you are still far more active than I am, even in older years. Hence, you still have what it takes to lift a napping A/T, even from a below the horizontal line. I still have some OK strength but, its really only applicable in advantage points. But, when the A/T is BELOW that advantage, as in totally laying on its side, DOWN HILL, that means my BEST capability to lift it, is not there. But, if my A/T had pannier bags/boxes, then the A/T would fall to only around a 30-45 degree angle.

When the bike is sitting (or laying) at that angle, then my best lifting advantage, is applicable. But, below that, I just don't have it anymore, like I used to. I applaud anyone who can lift that big girl, especially if it is laying with the tank facing downhill.
Scott
You are absolutely valid to declare that Scott.

Sadly I have to admit, it now takes me two pinky fingers to lift a napping AT.
















. . . I am just kidding! Really! :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
The various methods have been documented but a couple of extra points:

1) If seat of the bike is downhilll from the engine, you need to try to turn the bike around (yup, this may scratch it a bit) so that the seat is uphill. This will make a BIG difference.

2) For the AT, think of it as a 2 stage process. Stage one is to get it hoisted enough so that both wheels are touching the ground. Stage two is the final hoist process.

3) You are NOT "lifting" the bike. Get rid of that thought. You are pushing at 90 degrees to the bike, across it. That means, that at the very start (when it is off the wheels), you are pushing the bike both "up" and towards the wheels until the wheels are on the ground. Then you are pushing at more of a 45 degree angle against the seat and as the bike comes up, your angle gets more and more obtuse till near the top you are pushing at just about a horizontal angle.
I've been in that exact position you mention...very steep, deep ruts and baby heads. Fortunately I wasn't alone, getting the bike off that hill alone would have most definitely involved much scratched up plastic and me swearing a bluestreak as I dragged my new ATAS by the front wheel to face downhill. Honestly, it was such a bugger getting the bike turned around on such a steep, rough trail that I almost dumped it again on the way back down. In fact, my buddy had a good spill on the way back down and I had to lift the back end of his bike off his leg...he was pinned. I consider him a better rider than me...It was near the end of the day, it pushing up over 100F and we were both whooped. Another good reason to ride with a buddy on those off road adventures.

Oh and maybe we should have just acted our age...not our shoe size...LOL!:LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Been away from the forum for a while but interesting to see this thread just as I check back in... I dropped mine a few weeks ago - just one of those silly, inexplicable things.
I've had to pick it up a few times now - just part of riding. I remember the first time - I was shocked at the weight and certain I wouldn't get it up, but eventually did. I just had to relax and take it slow.
This last time it fell over, I got it on video and even put it up on YouTube. This time I was shocked at how easy it was. I'm sure it was a bit of my mini-adrenaline rush that helped but although you can't really tell in the video, the bike was all the way over and on fairly level ground.
The H&B engine guards certainly helped. With the engine guards, the bike is levered up just a bit up front.
But it really was so easy. I think after a while, you get used to it, know what to expect, I suppose. But this time, I just grabbed the handlebar and the rear rack and up she came, easy as pie.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter #135
Well,
It sure helps when you've got a pannier box on. The bike doesn't fall over so far.
Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
(EDIT)
Actually, the box had little to do with it - it did ding on the fall, but barely, and wasn't propping the bike up at all. As the bike was lying on the ground, the box was actually just off the asphalt, all the weight was on the front H&B lower, with a bit on the handlebar and the tank bag but the bike was all the way over and lying on the engine guard - which took the brunt of the fall. That 31L box is pretty narrow - kinda hard to tell in the video.
It's that few inches the engine guard props the bike up that makes the difference.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
Been away from the forum for a while but interesting to see this thread just as I check back in... I dropped mine a few weeks ago - just one of those silly, inexplicable things.
I've had to pick it up a few times now - just part of riding. I remember the first time - I was shocked at the weight and certain I wouldn't get it up, but eventually did. I just had to relax and take it slow.
This last time it fell over, I got it on video and even put it up on YouTube. This time I was shocked at how easy it was. I'm sure it was a bit of my mini-adrenaline rush that helped but although you can't really tell in the video, the bike was all the way over and on fairly level ground.
The H&B engine guards certainly helped. With the engine guards, the bike is levered up just a bit up front.
But it really was so easy. I think after a while, you get used to it, know what to expect, I suppose. But this time, I just grabbed the handlebar and the rear rack and up she came, easy as pie.

A brave video share. Thanks for that Gary. Yes, useful for a constant reminder that the nap lurks.

I would say you took it well. Maybe on average, a couple less f-bombs than the average napping AT video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
A brave video share. Thanks for that Gary. Yes, useful for a constant reminder that the nap lurks.

I would say you took it well. Maybe on average, a couple less f-bombs than the average napping AT video.
Yeah. It was a weird one, man. I like "nap" too.

I've had to pick the bike up a few times, but I've learned something interesting - at least with the 2018 ATAS: It doesn't take much to change the picture when this bike goes over. A few inches or a slight incline makes all the difference.

The first time it went over was day one, getting home with the bike and all excited, my wife taking pictures, etc., I forgot to put the kickstand down and... On my flat driveway, my first attempt shocked the crap out of me. But I was able to jerk the bike up some while wedging my helmet between the concrete and the front of the skid-plate - that one or two inches was all it took and I was then able to lift the bike easily.

The second time was on a trail. The H&B engine guards were installed and I had soft bags tied to my pannier rack but it didn't matter - I got lucky and the bike was on a slight incline, wheels down... popped up without a problem.

This last time, I'm convinced now the couple of inches the H&B bars lever the bike up is enough. It comes up so easy.

I'd say, if you're on a flat surface and don't have engine guards, it's a matter of inches - if you can just lever the bike up a few inches (under the engine, where the weight is) you can get to a point where lifting is easier... and presto.

BTW - the rear pannier really didn't play a role in helping lift the bike this last time. In the fall, it barely got dinged, hardly touched. And as the bike was lying on the ground, the box was actually just off the asphalt, not touching - all the weight was on the engine guard. And that few inches of tilt the bars add seems to be enough.

I'd say the moral of the story is: install engine guards that prop the bike up. Just a few inches is all it takes. (Or if you're on an incline, the wrong way, like someone else has already said, spin the bike - even on the slightest incline, it's night/ day - a matter of inches).

Gary

(EDIT) Ps. I think BCDon is on point about the mechanics. Once you've got both wheels on the ground she'll pop up easier. A good set of lowers just makes that step one process - (getting both wheels down and solid) much easier - you don't have to go as far. Without engine guards and in worst case - like on a flat surface - you'll just have to figure a way to lever up a few inches at the engine - and it is just a few inches (or the slightest incline) that will make all the difference.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DoubleThumper

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter #140
121 - 140 of 150 Posts
Top