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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just taken delivery of a 2020 ATAS and have looked at connecting up my connection point for an Optimate charger. I previously had a permanent connection in place on my Varadero and I'm looking to do the same on the AT.
It looks like there's a lot of plastic to remove to get to the battery terminals in order to connect the lead - does anyone have any experience/advice on fitting charging cables to one of the new bikes?

Thanks in advance!
 

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On the 2019 AT model I just pulled the lame "toolbox" off, connected the fused battery-terminal-to-SAE cable to the battery and routed to the SAE connector end to where I wanted it. I re-installed the lame toolbox.

I connected my motorcycle 12V lithium battery-compatible charger to the SAE connector and topped up the battery. No drama.
 

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I've fitted a Noco genius lead with charge state LED to my 2020, you will need to make a cut out for both connections on the tool box backing plate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've fitted a Noco genius lead with charge state LED to my 2020, you will need to make a cut out for both connections on the tool box backing plate.
Thanks Sonic, I'll take a closer look at the area around the tool box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just got around to finding the battery on my bike and I feel I right idiot now...!!
I was looking under the seat as that's where my other bikes have their battery terminals, then I found the small plastic cover on the left side under the tank and behold - there's a battery in there!

So my next question is - what do people use the small box in the battery cover for? You need to unscrew the cover to get inside, so anything in there is fairly secure, but I'm at a loss to think what (if anything) I might put in it.
 

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I just got around to finding the battery on my bike and I feel I right idiot now...!!
I was looking under the seat as that's where my other bikes have their battery terminals, then I found the small plastic cover on the left side under the tank and behold - there's a battery in there!

So my next question is - what do people use the small box in the battery cover for? You need to unscrew the cover to get inside, so anything in there is fairly secure, but I'm at a loss to think what (if anything) I might put in it.
Honda thinks you would put tools in that box. In the box, my bike came with a single, lame screwdriver and a small fuse puller in a cracking vinyl pouch. Utterly useless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The box is fixed with two allen screws, so you have to have some tools to get into the box in the first place! Fortunately under the rear seat there is an allen key and a screwdriver handle - the rest of the tools are in a small pouch under the rear seat. Honda have decided to spread the tools around the place in different locations!

I was thinking the box would be where you'd store valuable items - put a small amount of cash in there for emergencies, or a small medical kit perhaps. On my old Varadero it had a lockable box where I could keep a notebook, small bungee cord, side stand puck, etc. But this AT box is too much trouble to open for storing stuff you may need on a more frequent basis.
 

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The box is fixed with two allen screws, so you have to have some tools to get into the box in the first place! Fortunately under the rear seat there is an allen key and a screwdriver handle - the rest of the tools are in a small pouch under the rear seat. Honda have decided to spread the tools around the place in different locations!

I was thinking the box would be where you'd store valuable items - put a small amount of cash in there for emergencies, or a small medical kit perhaps. On my old Varadero it had a lockable box where I could keep a notebook, small bungee cord, side stand puck, etc. But this AT box is too much trouble to open for storing stuff you may need on a more frequent basis.
It appears Honda feels those of us in North America are incapable of anything more than changing a fuse or checking the battery. We are only given an Allen wrench, fuse puller and a double ended screwdriver. Perhaps because of the legacy for British bikes needing continous ongoing maintenance, Honda feels British riders are much more mechanically able than us.😊
 

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The box is fixed with two allen screws, so you have to have some tools to get into the box in the first place! Fortunately under the rear seat there is an allen key and a screwdriver handle - the rest of the tools are in a small pouch under the rear seat. Honda have decided to spread the tools around the place in different locations!

I was thinking the box would be where you'd store valuable items - put a small amount of cash in there for emergencies, or a small medical kit perhaps. On my old Varadero it had a lockable box where I could keep a notebook, small bungee cord, side stand puck, etc. But this AT box is too much trouble to open for storing stuff you may need on a more frequent basis.
Mentioned before, but I re-emphasize, Honda designers could have tried to secure the box with a lock mechanism. Not only are the box contents freely available, but so is the battery and everything else associated under the tank.
 

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It appears Honda feels those of us in North America are incapable of anything more than changing a fuse or checking the battery. We are only given an Allen wrench, fuse puller and a double ended screwdriver. Perhaps because of the legacy for British bikes needing continous ongoing maintenance, Honda feels British riders are much more mechanically able than us.😊
There is some implied truth in that statement in regards to Honda reliability.

However, the diehard offroaders will likely say risks change greatly during deep offroading no matter what the make/model of bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"...British bikes needing continous ongoing maintenance..."
Very true, but there's not a lot you can do with a broken down Honda engine (and associated electronics) in the middle of nowhere, so perhaps that's why there's only a few tools! :)

At least with an engine that you had to dismantle every weekend to keep it going you got to know exactly how it all worked...:D:D (and yes, I did have to do that many years ago..)
 

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"...British bikes needing continous ongoing maintenance..."
Very true, but there's not a lot you can do with a broken down Honda engine (and associated electronics) in the middle of nowhere, so perhaps that's why there's only a few tools! :)

At least with an engine that you had to dismantle every weekend to keep it going you got to know exactly how it all worked...:D:D (and yes, I did have to do that many years ago..)
Aren't 21st century Triumphs essentially no different in regards to the integration of current technology? For better or for worse, pretty well all the Italian labels are.
 

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EamonnT - I can't help you on how easy it is to install because I was very fortunate as my Dealer had installed a connector on my new bike that had a tag that said Optimate ready. They said that they put it on everything they sell with a battery. I had a charger already but for someone that doesn't they also offer a very good deal on a charger with the bike. I've been very impressed with this dealership as they have done many little extras that previous Dealers never bothered with. I had gone to them because they were the only ones that had the new bike in my area and I will probably continue to do all my purchases there in the future. It's a smaller family run business that has 2 locations. For me having a good Dealer that you can depend on if you have a problem is the most important part of a new purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Absolutely agree 100% with your comments on a dealer. My nearest Honda dealer didn't really listen to what I wanted in a Varadero replacement - the dealer I bought the bike from was 50 miles in the opposite direction but did everything I asked for (some as part of the purchase price). The only problem now is that the dealer (like most other UK businesses) are closed until we get some release of the current lock-down restrictions.

Maybe that little toolbox is designed to hold the face masks...!:)

And Double Thumper, you're right it's only the bikes built before (say) 1975 that you can take apart at the side of the road to fix up and get going again. Unfortunately on the pre 75 Brit bikes it seemed to happen all too often!
 

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Fitted a battery tender for a opitmate charger, fiddly getting the terminal screws back on due to the holding nuts being lose. Cut slot out of the back of the plastic tool box ( you wouldn't get many tools in there )to store the tender inside works well.
 

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managed to get a cable in there without cutting anything just have to ensure that the cable stays far left as there is a little more space.
54870
 

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Has anyone tried charging via an 09 12v DIN plug on a CRF1100 using the socket in the cockpit?
 

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Aren't 21st century Triumphs essentially no different in regards to the integration of current technology? For better or for worse, pretty well all the Italian labels are.
Triumphs from 1990 on seem to have dropped the reliability issues of the earlier British bikes and matched the Japanese bikes. The biggest issue I had with my Trophy 3 was the starter clutch failure. According to the book that is a 15 hour job to replace, if you are trained and familiar with the procedure. It took me somewhat longer. The unit is in the center of the engine cases and located above the transmission with no direct access from above on most of the triples. Been there, done that and have no intention of doing it again. I certainly hope anything I have to do with my ATAS won't be as difficult as the Triumph was.
 

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Has anyone tried charging via an 09 12v DIN plug on a CRF1100 using the socket in the cockpit?
There is an "inconvenient" relay in between but they thought of everything; so no go :)
 
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