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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello mates,

yesterday I chrashed with my AT alone. There was no one to help me. I was able to pick it up alone after putting all my luggage off the bike. Now for few days I have pains in my back :mad:

Is there any good recepy for lifting the AT that may back would not suffer too much :cool: :crying:

Thank you in advance for any advice ... 0:)
 

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I have seen a device that consists of a pole that snaps together, then you place it next to your bike and use a ratcheting tie down strap to lift the bike. It looks a little unhandy to carry around on the bike, but would do the trick.
 

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motowinch

I have seen a device that consists of a pole that snaps together, then you place it next to your bike and use a ratcheting tie down strap to lift the bike. It looks a little unhandy to carry around on the bike, but would do the trick.
https://www.eastbound.org/english-menu/motowinch/

This can be combined with a set of pieces (well engineered) that convert the 'pole' to various tools for tyre removal all from the same kit. It is not cheap but looks good quality and a saviour if you ride alone

Ian
 

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I dropped my AT for the first time today as well. Greasy/oily road at a red light, foot went out, bike came over. I had my SW-motech crash bars and Happy Trail hard panniers on, and it was pretty easy to pick up the bike because of the angle they keep the bike up at. When I first bought the bike, I practiced and made sure I could pick it up on my own both with no gear and fully loaded by leaning it over to the ground and back up, like doing squats.
 

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Common method.

If you have to muscle it, I'd buy a couple tie down extensions that you can loop around any part of the bike and loop them around your wrists to lift the bike without trying to hold on to something awkward.

NC
 

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Unfortunately, that "common" method rarely works well when off road, as it requires your feet to have excellent traction. I have much better success facing the bike, turn the bars all the way toward you, two hands on the grip closest you, and lift straight up using legs as much as possible. But first, try and start with as advantageous angle as possible. You want to at least not have the bike leaning below 0 degrees. That may mean spinning the bike around a bit while still on the ground (to lean uphill vs down), and/or using some branches, rocks, or luggage to slightly prop the bike up a little. The other thing is to try and do it on the first lift, because you're only going to drain energy and get weaker after each try. This means get prepared and get your adrenaline going, and then attack!

Trust me, I have plenty of experience picking up heavy ADV bikes. I've dropped 'em more times than soap in the shower.
 

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But for all the times on road it is good to know how to do.

NC


Unfortunately, that "common" method rarely works well when off road, as it requires your feet to have excellent traction. I have much better success facing the bike, turn the bars all the way toward you, two hands on the grip closest you, and lift straight up using legs as much as possible. But first, try and start with as advantageous angle as possible. You want to at least not have the bike leaning below 0 degrees. That may mean spinning the bike around a bit while still on the ground (to lean uphill vs down), and/or using some branches, rocks, or luggage to slightly prop the bike up a little. The other thing is to try and do it on the first lift, because you're only going to drain energy and get weaker after each try. This means get prepared and get your adrenaline going, and then attack!

Trust me, I have plenty of experience picking up heavy ADV bikes. I've dropped 'em more times than soap in the shower.
 

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Yup you pretty much lift it however it will come up when you're in the dirt, and that backwards method has never worked for me. All I could say is just use the same rules you use for doing squats and deadlifts in the gym (if you're into that stuff). Get your feet in a good planted position, keep your back straight, look ahead not down at the bike during the hard part, keep vertebrae in line. Grab the bike wherever you can and try to lift it using mostly leg muscles. That's about all you can do. If you're driven to do so, toss some squats, dead lifts, clean and press into your workout regime if you don't already. Avoid injuries later.
 

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Yup you pretty much lift it however it will come up when you're in the dirt, and that backwards method has never worked for me. All I could say is just use the same rules you use for doing squats and deadlifts in the gym (if you're into that stuff). Get your feet in a good planted position, keep your back straight, look ahead not down at the bike during the hard part, keep vertebrae in line. Grab the bike wherever you can and try to lift it using mostly leg muscles. That's about all you can do. If you're driven to do so, toss some squats, dead lifts, clean and press into your workout regime if you don't already. Avoid injuries later.
This is why I recommend carrying a set of tie down extension loops. You can attach them anywhere on the bike and loop them around your wrists so that you don't have to grab something awkward on the bike. They also allow you to NOT have to bend quite so far. They are worth the $15 they cost.

NC
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ6_2VqSHBw

Common method.

If you have to muscle it, I'd buy a couple tie down extensions that you can loop around any part of the bike and loop them around your wrists to lift the bike without trying to hold on to something awkward.

NC
I do realize there is value to the method in the video and have used it myself. But, I found it kinda a funny how at the start the lady just lays the bike down as if it's as light as a feather. She seemed to struggle more picking it up with the shown method than if she had just grabbed the bars and picked it back up like she had laid it down! LOL
 

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I do realize there is value to the method in the video and have used it myself. But, I found it kinda a funny how at the start the lady just lays the bike down as if it's as light as a feather. She seemed to struggle more picking it up with the shown method than if she had just grabbed the bars and picked it back up like she had laid it down! LOL
Agree it is a relatively light bike and isn't lying flat on the ground. Also, those tiny little women are closer to the ground and probably have it easier than a real tall, skinny, olive-oil looking woman.

NC
 

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Although I haven't tried it, I think the combination of the kneeling method and the use of tie down straps would be easiest on the back. I have used motorcycle tie down straps to pick up a piano. One on each end, lets you lift from a body position with most leverage. Hope I don;t need to have to try this myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZ6_2VqSHBw

Common method.

If you have to muscle it, I'd buy a couple tie down extensions that you can loop around any part of the bike and loop them around your wrists to lift the bike without trying to hold on to something awkward.

NC
Yes I tried this method but the traction of my feet was not so good in the snow. Two times I finished sitting in snow near my AT. I must try some other methods like on the other two vids ...

Thank's for all the hepl ...

My back is going to be better :grin2:
 

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I bought MotoWinch aluminum winch-set plus foot pad (for soft ground) & 22 & 27 mm ring spanner attachments.
It's well made and fit for purpose.
Check out their video demo [eastbound.org]
Two friends have developed back problems some time after lifting a heavy bike.
It's a 1-2 ? kilos and needs to be secured to stop it bouncing around inside panniers.
Practice using it at home first, with attention to how you secure the strap to the end of the handlebar.
I would not go anywhere alone without it.
 
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