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As long as your engine block isn’t hot, is there any reason i shouldn’t pressure wash my AT? There’s a car wash right down the street from my house, but I have this intuitive sense that i shouldn’t. Thoughts?
 

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I think you would be fine no difference from being off road with a hot engine and riding through a ford or flooded trail.. Only my thoughts im not a mechanic...
 

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Just keep away from the o-ring chain - you don't want water under the seals. I pressure wash motorbikes all the time, but tend to keep away from any potentially sensitive parts - the instrument cluster, electrical stuff, carbies, exhaust pipe opening, etc....
 

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Just keep away from the o-ring chain - you don't want water under the seals. I pressure wash motorbikes all the time, but tend to keep away from any potentially sensitive parts - the instrument cluster, electrical stuff, carbies, exhaust pipe opening, etc....
Add wheel bearings and rear suspension pivots to the list.
 

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Not a good idea folks..


The bike shall get water propelled at angles not normal to riding conditions & could get into areas on the top half of the bike's electrical stuff like switches connectors etc.


I am only saying it could happen.., especially when the bike ages & rubbers get older..


Rather safe than sorry I say..
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. Use a bit of a spray instead of a tight beam of water. Don't be an idiot and spray high speed water at the instrument cluster or fusebox etc. but for most areas it shouldn't be a problem.
 

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Works just fine. I wouldn't blast away at your sealed x-ring chain or the hubs, or any open electrical parts, but otherwise, it shouldn't be an issue.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. Use a bit of a spray instead of a tight beam of water. Don't be an idiot and spray high speed water at the instrument cluster or fusebox etc. but for most areas it shouldn't be a problem.
Diffused spray from a distance that does not feel stingy to the back of your hand should be ok, as long as you do not get to close & blast certain areas near the head cluster & switches on the handle bars..
 

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Iv never used a power washer on any of my bikes.dulls the paint can leave fine scratches if there is grit in mud.garden hose with some motorbike degreaser.then proper car shampoo and a microfiber cloth.rince.Dry with good leather shammy.polish and shine.same with car.Bit of elbow grease never killed anyone.One thing always do after bike cools down is cold water and micro cloth and wash and soften the dead flies off bike b4 I put away and wash off salt in winter.
 

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I have pressure washed mine once a week for the past couple years with no issues, Original chain, bearings, and everything. I use the high-pressure guns at the car wash, my engine is not cool either.... I have 18,000 miles of pretty hard usage no problems.... Did I get lucky or is everyone over worrying?

Edit: granted the pressure washer at the car wash is probably like 1500 PSI, not 3000 PSI like most good home units xD
 

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I always use pressure washer. It takes me at least 30 minutes with it to get all the mud and crap out of that bike since it has 152,972 crevices that mud gets into when on the trails. I lay the bike down on the ground and get it underneath, lift it up and do it again on the other side. I put it on the center stand and let the pressure washer nozzle turn the rear tire on it's own and clean off the chain with it spinning that way as well. I've never had an o-ring chain wear out before the sprockets did, at which time I replace them as a set. Never hold onto a chain in questionable shape, have learned that the hard way and destroyed a couple engines with broken chains - trying to stretch chain life back in the day. Keep nozzle a couple feet away when cleaning around the seals at the axles and don't ever spray upward at the fork seals. Don't spray electrical connectors. Don't spray directly on the handlebar controls and display. Don't spray anywhere near the exhaust outlets. Run the bike around the neighborhood when done if you can or warm it up at least. Leaf blower can also be your friend.
 
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