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I would be interested in peoples opinions of the pros and cons of crash bars for a bike that will be not be used off road. From a purely aesthetic position I prefer the look of the bike without them. Then there is the issue of the bars actually causing damage to the frame etc.
 

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Yes I am in the same boat too..80-90% road ...And maybe some light off road..We all have to agree that if you have a major accident .. Having crash bars would be the least of your worries..So where does that leaves us:
Protection from low speed or static falls. I have even tried to see if there are any sliders available..But nothing out there..

Cons : weight ...Weight weight...
Also,I was talking to a guy that has the full givi cage and he told me that it definitely upsets the balance of the bike..I would probably believe him ..This thing is like an exosceleton...

With the current market options ..And if I decided to go down that route ..the best option would be the Honda OEM bars painted black. It would be more than enough to protect the bike from low speed falls ..And it only weights 2.5 kgs..


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Easy decision for me. I ride lots of off road and one moderate, non injury wipe-out without crash bars could cost me an easy $2500+ for fairings, fairing stays, pipes, side case, headlight and radiator. A big crash may destroy everything, even with the crash bars but I can only do so much. Look up the prices, yourself. the Queen is not a cheap bike to fix.
 

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If 80-90% of riding is all road and I'm a skilled/cautious/patient rider...then I wouldn't install any bars. Never have on any of my street sportbikes.

"From a purely aesthetic position I prefer the look of the bike without them." I can't agree with you more. The bike just looks awesome!

"Also,I was talking to a guy that has the full givi cage and he told me that it definitely upsets the balance of the bike..."
But doesn't adding panniers/luggage have the same affect? If yes, then I may want to reconsider not adding bar protection.

For me, as much as I don't want to add protection bar it's a must. I'm short, have lumbar issues, and is my first ADV bike so I know I'm bound to drop (not crash) this bike.

"Then there is the issue of the bars actually causing damage to the frame etc."...is this fact or an assumption?
 

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So weeks ago I mounted the Outback Motortek crash, to me they look **** good, doesn't really upset the line of the bike, no dynamic or balance problem whatsoever and they are tough !


I am in the same case, so 90% on road riding, but this bike is so fun when I tried off-road that I might do it more.


But some reports have shown the bigger Givi or Honda, to contact the plastics and still brake them, which is why i find them useless and wouldn't mount them even for more off-roading. It's lower protection that I would care about.


Then on the matter of not needing them... this bike is high and heavy, I was very confidant I wouldn't drop my roadsters that I had before and didn't, but with the AT there is a lot more risk it happens.
Maybe you stop at a red light, with slipery **** or gravel under your foot and bam you're down, maybe you manoeuver the bike with engine off on the side and again **** on the ground... you just can't catch a 232Kg with high bars like you do with a 190Kg 20cm lower roadster, that's physics !


As I will be travelling abroad, a minimum protection was mandatory to me, if it can save me from canceling the vacation in the middle, because the radiator is dead or casing damaged, I can pay 250 for these and do with looks !
 

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Nemesis, I agree with you...Panniers and top boxes upset the balance of the bike ...A lot...For city riding or when alone I just use a roll top bag strapped to the pillion and rear rack with Rok straps..I know that it might not look great ...But I like it and the bike feels great..The added bonus is that you have a back rest as well..
When I am riding with my wife then I clip on my givi maxia..But then with all this weight the bike is really steady, and I am not pushing too much..

Djairouks..In some other post in the forum people argued that the outback crash bars mount on the frame in a way that if the bike falls it might damage the frame. What's your thoughts on that ? I must admit I like them but didn't pulled the trigger because of these reports


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I would get some basic crash bars even if you're doing 100% on road. It's a heavy, tall bike and sooner or later it's most likely coming down. It's cheap insurance to have IMO
 

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Nemesis, I agree with you...Panniers and top boxes upset the balance of the bike ...A lot...For city riding or when alone I just use a roll top bag strapped to the pillion and rear rack with Rok straps..I know that it might not look great ...But I like it and the bike feels great..The added bonus is that you have a back rest as well..
When I am riding with my wife then I clip on my givi maxia..But then with all this weight the bike is really steady, and I am not pushing too much..

Djairouks..In some other post in the forum people argued that the outback crash bars mount on the frame in a way that if the bike falls it might damage the frame. What's your thoughts on that ? I must admit I like them but didn't pulled the trigger because of these reports


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I think people really don't have ingeneering or material science background, on the side it's mounted on the frame, that part would never come in contact with the road, it's the front side that will and if the shock is strong, there is about 1m of tube that could bend to absorb the shock.
Those people then have less problems with the bar on the other side hold by if i remember well, 3 short M6 between frame and engine, please !?


I mean let's be real here, if you crash while going fast enough, no bars in the world will keep the bike from maybe having the frame damaged and engine casing damaged. We are talking about a low speed or standing drop, that's what these are designed to do, nothing more.
But no bars at all is still taking the risk that your bike be over within seconds for a silly drop, my choice here was quickly made !


The same with frame sliders, I knew a guy that crashed with his CBR600, that was equiped with plastic sliders and he crashed fast enough that they wore out before the bike stopped and all fairings were dead.
Even worse with those plastic sliders on lighter bikes, I know a guy which saw his bike kind of sommersault because it rebound on the sliders, totally destroying it.


Bottom line is, for fast crashes we all have insurances, there's no way around that, but you can at least avoid being stranded on the road while looking at the phone and slipping down...
 

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I think people really don't have ingeneering or material science background, on the side it's mounted on the frame, that part would never come in contact with the road, it's the front side that will and if the shock is strong, there is about 1m of tube that could bend to absorb the shock.
Those people then have less problems with the bar on the other side hold by if i remember well, 3 short M6 between frame and engine, please !?


I mean let's be real here, if you crash while going fast enough, no bars in the world will keep the bike from maybe having the frame damaged and engine casing damaged. We are talking about a low speed or standing drop, that's what these are designed to do, nothing more.
But no bars at all is still taking the risk that your bike be over within seconds for a silly drop, my choice here was quickly made !


The same with frame sliders, I knew a guy that crashed with his CBR600, that was equiped with plastic sliders and he crashed fast enough that they wore out before the bike stopped and all fairings were dead.
Even worse with those plastic sliders on lighter bikes, I know a guy which saw his bike kind of sommersault because it rebound on the sliders, totally destroying it.


Bottom line is, for fast crashes we all have insurances, there's no way around that, but you can at least avoid being stranded on the road while looking at the phone and slipping down...


Yes I only talk about really low speed falls or static falls. So you think for these types of falls there will be no damage to the frame? The last thing I want is to save the plastics but damage the frame...

It seems that you are a mechanical engineer so that's why I am asking ...I am an engineer too but in telecommunications... Always trust an engineer!




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Crash bars don't add enough weight to upset the balance of the bike. Sure throw on panniers, top box, and load that stuff up you are going to feel a difference. I bet if you did a "blind fold" test and put the same person on a bike with and without crash bars and asked them to tell you which was which after riding, they couldn't tell you with certainty which was which.

Just like others have commented, crash bars are really only helpful in tip-overs and very slow drops, mostly off-road. I've seen a few pics advriders.com where guys have crashed at a decent speed on-road, and the crash bars didn't help at all and in a few cases actually look like they did more damage as they bent into the motorcycle.

I have them as I ride 50/50 and crash bars have saved my motorcycles from damage. So they are one of the first things I put on my ADV bikes. Personally, I don't like the look of crash bars. IMO, they ruin the lines of the bike. If I did 90% road, I wouldn't put them on my bike...
 

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R&G make some fork sliders for the AT that look like they might help a bit. They only take 5 minutes to fit and are cheap enough. I haven't felt any handling difference through the extra unsprung weight.
I wish they did frame sliders as they might help protect engine casings and radiator if not fairings
Mike
 

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For my two penneth....

I am a mainly road only type the bike has seen grass once!

I fitted givi lower engine bars to protect the engine and keep the weight low, didn't see any real difference in handling. I also fitted crash bungs/frame sliders in the holes for the passenger foot pegs which I removed.

I agree fork sliders would be a good idea and I've also been looking at barkbusters which are pretty invisible cosmetically.

Maybe also look at heavy duty sump guard sometime.
 

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Yes I only talk about really low speed falls or static falls. So you think for these types of falls there will be no damage to the frame? The last thing I want is to save the plastics but damage the frame...

It seems that you are a mechanical engineer so that's why I am asking ...I am an engineer too but in telecommunications... Always trust an engineer!

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My solutions were SW Motech, Givi or OM, looking at fixation points, metal thickness, tubes diameter and design, I decided to go OM. To me SW are a tad low on the radiator, design seems weeker against impact and tubes are smaller.
Givi (TN1144) good size tubes and design okay but no protection to radiator, for a bit less $ than the OM, so choice wasn't really hard.


I'm not a mechanical engineer in the strict sense of diplomas, I worked as engineer in automated construction lines, so I have background in electronics, mechanics, hydraulics and robotic arms plus programming.
I wasn't only designing stuff, I built them as well, so I have maybe more real life experience of parts than guys that only work behind a desk, I am also curious to always expend my knowledge and try stuff.
Then I worked as a service engineer within materials science, machines that tested different capabilities of metals, plastics, ceramics etc and while being in no way an expert and prone like everyone else to be wrong at times.
 
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Apart from sometimes using the bike to work and back, I also do quite a bit of dirt roads and some more technical stuff. I have had 2 stupid fall overs on some rocky sections. Once to the left and once to the right. I am very happy I had fitted some 'protection', because it would have cost me quite a bit for plastics if I did not have protection.

I fitted Hepco and Becker pannier racks, no panniers, RockFox upper and lower crash bars and Barkbusters. All of these did their job. Yes it adds weight to the bike, but for 'adventure' riding you are already loading the bike up and you are at risk of having a incident on the trip. To me, the protection is imperative because I don't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere with a serious problem because I didn't want to add 3kg's to a 240 kg bike, loaded up with luggage.

What I still must do is get sliders and tubeless rims, but that's another story.
 
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Knowing I was going to be on lots of back roads and rugged situations I planned immediately for full protection for slow speed drops or rock intrusions. The full bunker Heed I purchased from Poland was shipped quickly, good quality, lightweight and went on easily. And along with the Barkbusters they have already proved their usefulness as I have pushed it. Even though the bike is beautiful I do not treat it like a chromed out street bike, I planned for it to get dirty and have its misadventures.

There are a few levels of dirt activity. Forest service type roads that get muddy, rocky, and slippery seem to be the norm. It only takes once on that 10% on poor roads to make you happy you have protection.

However I never felt the need for that protection on tarmac or good quality secondary dirt or gravel roads.
 

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The one thing I don't see talked about here is training. As a former LE motorcycle instructor, I train religiously both on the street and through slow exercise cone patterns (35 years collision free so I'm sticking with what I know.) At least once a month, I set up cones in my favorite school parking lot and invite friends and my daughters boyfriends who ride, to a training day ( they're good guys otherwise I might not offer this to them ;).) I offer various slow cone patterns, collision avoidance drills and braking exercises (threshold, braking in a curve, trail braking, etc.) Then we go for a ride before getting lunch. Everyone really enjoys the confidence they leave with after a good day training and the camaraderie spending time other guys who love motorcycling .

If we are training regularly, like we all should be, and if you enjoy pushing yourself, the drop bars a must for those occasional slow tip overs. Keep the cone patterns wide initially and tighten them up once your skills improve, especially in the dirt. You can download all the LE patterns here...http://conepatterns.com/

A collapsible measuring wheel works really well to help lay out the patterns. (https://www.amazon.com/Wheel-Collap...ds=roll+measuring+wheel&qid=1617807648&sr=8-4

These stackable cones work well and can be transported in a soft bag to the training site..... https://www.amazon.com/Haploon-Football-Easy-Stack-Multi-Colored-Training/dp/B07RK2BDZ9
 

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I am with you about the continuous training aspect. I taught MSF classes for a long time. Every time I'd run through all the drills before the students came. Then with my partner we'd switch off through the day and alternate who did the demo. I can't tell you how that always kept the rust off so to speak.
 

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I am with you about the continuous training aspect. I taught MSF classes for a long time. Every time I'd run through all the drills before the students came. Then with my partner we'd switch off through the day and alternate who did the demo. I can't tell you how that always kept the rust off so to speak.
I have alot of respect for civilian motorcycle instructors. Instructors like you have saved many lives through your training and the ones I've met always loved their job teaching students of every level. 👏
 

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Thanks, I loved doing it. Challenging though at times as if they passed the class (for the beginning rider) they also got their MC endorsement. I couldn't deliberately fail a student, such as one who was able to technically pass the course but a danger to him/her/self and others. I lost count of how many I took aside and had a heart to heart talk with them about their chances of survival based on their skill level at that point in time. There were going to need crashbars and an airbag suit to have any chance of surviving.
 

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Friend of mine used to race Hondas, had a varadero before getting into AT's. On the varadero was going into a turn at intersection, some ice on pavement, down he went and tumbled across intersection with bike hitting the pavement. Had crash bars on it, saved the plastics and good bits, no frame damage.
On AT, yes to bars.

Even my Honda ST1300 has factory bars built around engine under small plastic covers, have guards at back to protect also.
 
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