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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is the right sub-forum to post this. If not, moderators please feel free to move thread.

Okay, so let's talk protective gear.

ADV riding is new to me (rode/raced sportbikes), so I'm not all that familiar with ADV riding gear. I have so many questions so your input/experience with certain brands would be greatly appreciated.

I have been obsessed with protective gear ever since I learned (the hard way) that the terms "protective gear" didn't just stop at the head, hands, and upper torso. I have spent probably $12K, if not more, in search for the best "protective" gear the industry had to offer to riders/racers.

How many of you guys have lowsided on the streets wearing your ADV riding gear? How did your gear hold up? What was the extent of your injuries?

The reason I'm asking is that from my observation I can't help but think since ADV riding gear is not skin tight like that of sportbike riding gear the armor is more susceptible to shift in a crash. In addition, the absence of abrasive resistant materials incorporated onto the design like that of leather/kangaroo/stingray elevates my concerns. Although in my research I heard about a material used in ADV gear called "Superfabric" that's just as abrasive resistant, if not better, than cowhide/kangaroo. But that's just on small areas (i.e. elbows & shoulders).

I know I don't have to conform to wearing ADV gear if I'm concerned about their safety features...but I like to look the part. :grin2::wink2: Besides, I'm sensitive to the heat and wearing leathers in 90+F is not my idea of fun.:laugh:

Anyhow, which brands and model would you guys recommend for someone so concerned about safety features?

TIA
 

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Well you aught to check out Klim as they are a big adv gear icon. This stuff is of course off road biased, there's no one saying you can't wear your full leathers if you're on pavement, ala supermoto. All their gear is about 500% overpriced so my current favorite jacket is the Klim Traverse because it is far cheaper than their other jackets and I added my own d30 armor from other moto gear into the included armor pockets. Unfortunately the new 2016 version of the klim traverse jacket has been stripped way down and uses a much thinner Cordura fabric than the old one making it in effect not much more than a rain over-jacket in my opinion. My guess is that they couldn't have a $300 jacket that is just as tough as their $1600 adventure rally jacket so they stripped it and cranked up the price. So if you can find an old model traverse jacket in your size in the back of some shop somewhere, definitely get it. You can beat it around in the trees all day and not feel bad about it, and I've had about 10 or 15 get offs on the trails with no visible damage to the jacket. I wear it enduro riding all spring because it's much warmer than the motocross jerseys I usually wear, and things get pretty sketchy in the snow and mud that time of year! The armor stays in place well even though it wasn't necessarily even designed for the jacket, the grid pattern of dots bruised onto my shoulders from the holes in the armor after a crash is proof they stayed in place for the impact. Sliding on my back down down the road feels like a sunday afternoon activity with the big d30 plate I put in the back. It is of course waterproof and has always kept me dry in the rain/splashing water. Ventilation is good, the jackets all have a pair of zips on the front or armpits and another zip on the back somewhere to get air flow through.
 

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Nemesis, this is the best information I have found for a new adventure/dual sport rider.


The young man's YouTube site is EVERIDE and it is a wealth of knowledge and fun riding videos

I wear the body armor, full shin and knee guards, ankle protective boots, etc. when I ride off road. The gear has proven its worth to me many times. You will find "unique" ways to crash off road especially as a new off road rider. By the way,some of what works on pavement will bust your butt off road. I know this from personal experience. :eek:

I have a couple of off road training videos which have really helped me. You will also find several teaching sites on the net.

I hope this will help.
Jim
 

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I low-sided once on pavement at about 35 mph and skidded at least 20 feet. My only point of contact with the road was my left knee. I was wearing klim pants (an older model that I could afford) with D30 armor, and the skid wore through three layers of fabric and part of the armor, but I was uninjured. I had a bit of a bruise on my knee but I was fine to continue riding and it was nothing worse than you might get tripping or something.
I couldn't decide if the pants failed or not. While they definitely protected me, I would have expected them to hold up a little better. Klim replaced them for free under their gear protection guarantee. Based on this experience, I am very uncomfortable riding without leg protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your input guys. Keep them coming.


Crstep, thanks for sharing. That's exactly what I was waiting for (review w/pics).


I just visited Klim's website for the first time, and all I have to say is WTF?!!!! $1,800 for a jacket? Just the jacket? Really? You can buy a custom race suit for that amount of money. That's just plain stupid. But is it really worth every penny? Hmm...
 

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I can't imagine it's worth that much money when there are other comparable manufacturers out there. I got my pants and jacket 50% off on closeout, and it was the mid range set (latitude/altitude). $500 for Gore Tex and D30 armor in the back and hips (besides just knees, elbows, shoulders) seemed a good deal. Unfortunately it's no longer available at that price and the new series is even more expensive.
 

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I low-sided once on pavement at about 35 mph and skidded at least 20 feet. My only point of contact with the road was my left knee. I was wearing klim pants (an older model that I could afford) with D30 armor, and the skid wore through three layers of fabric and part of the armor, but I was uninjured. I had a bit of a bruise on my knee but I was fine to continue riding and it was nothing worse than you might get tripping or something.
I couldn't decide if the pants failed or not. While they definitely protected me, I would have expected them to hold up a little better. Klim replaced them for free under their gear protection guarantee. Based on this experience, I am very uncomfortable riding without leg protection.
Wow I didn't know they had a program to replace the gear too, that's good to know, do other companies do that? Looks like they did their job to me. I'd say you'd be replacing anything you wore if your knee was holding the weight of you and the bike against the ground in a slide, no?

It is retarded expensive, I usually buy old stock stuff on sale as well. The best materials and protection is of course only available in the top models. The fabric on the slide zones of the adventure rally pants and jacket is supposed to be 4x more abrasion resistant than a typical 1.4 mil leather motorcycle apparel material. I'd consider buying one some day when I'm done spending money on bike parts if they came in black instead of making a guy look like a grey rent-a-cop.

I should also mention that I never ride off road without my knee braces and full motocross boots, or sidi adventure boots. My beat up knees and ankles need every bit of help they can get, and the most innocent little dab of your foot on the ground can jar your knee and tear a ligament or worse. The knee braces help even out the forces and keep things held together. I am currently using the mobius braces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Almost any textile gear will tear open sliding on tarmac. The only textile fabric I know that won't is Dainese's "superfabric-like" fabric called D-stone.

Some 8yrs ago I had bought a 2pc suit completely made out of D-stone (I forget the name of the model). Wore it to the track one day, and ended up crashing around 70mph. I recall landing on my shoulder/elbow first then sliding forever on tarmac. The plastic armor in the shoulders/elbow area absorbed all the impact. I remember thinking, "Oh $H!T this is going to hurt!!!" But upon impact my "Oh $h!t" turned into "Oooohh???" I returned to the garage expecting busted seams and a big hole in the D-stone exposing a nasty rash or something but was greeted with just scuff marks. Best investment EVER!!!!

I just happened to google D-stone and came across my old pics I posted on another forum years ago. Enjoy.

Comparison: Mesh Textile vs D-Stone


Mesh Textile:




D-stone:






The D-stone was so breathable it felt like I was wearing mesh gear. The only downside to the D-stone is it's not a thin material hence why Dainese most likely won't incorporate it on their touring gear.
 

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In Europe most motorcycle clothing worth its salt carries a CE Mark, it encompasses two standards, one for impact and one for abrasion. Choosing CE marked clothing is at least a good starting point. Any decent manufacturer, European or otherwise, is going to at least meet these standards. There is tons of knock off crap out there to be wary of. This explains it nicely. http://www.mc-ams.co.uk/blog/ce-means-motorcyclists/

Impact Abrasion - "The important and significant difference with the new test, detailed in EN 13595-2:2002, was that it was designed to simulate what would happen during a real-life motorcycle accident when a rider falls from his or her machine."

Impact Performance -
EN 1621-1:2012, Impact protectors worn during motorcycling, and activities such as contact sports, are designed to reduce the contact pressure on the body during a collision. They do this, firstly, by increasing the contact area – usually by using a hard outer shell – and, secondly, by reducing the peak force applied – usually by increasing the duration of the impact through a reduction in the relative deceleration between the body and the object being impacted by use of a deformable material.
 

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Wow I didn't know they had a program to replace the gear too, that's good to know, do other companies do that? Looks like they did their job to me. I'd say you'd be replacing anything you wore if your knee was holding the weight of you and the bike against the ground in a slide, no?

It is retarded expensive, I usually buy old stock stuff on sale as well. The best materials and protection is of course only available in the top models. The fabric on the slide zones of the adventure rally pants and jacket is supposed to be 4x more abrasion resistant than a typical 1.4 mil leather motorcycle apparel material. I'd consider buying one some day when I'm done spending money on bike parts if they came in black instead of making a guy look like a grey rent-a-cop.

I should also mention that I never ride off road without my knee braces and full motocross boots, or sidi adventure boots. My beat up knees and ankles need every bit of help they can get, and the most innocent little dab of your foot on the ground can jar your knee and tear a ligament or worse. The knee braces help even out the forces and keep things held together. I am currently using the mobius braces.
Just to provide more information, the only weight on my knee was the weight of my leg. My bike slid on crash bars and a cheap plastic givi box, both of which survived (as did the bike). I definitely agree that the replacement plan is a fantastic value. All in all, what stuck with me was the thought of what would have happened if I had worn jeans. It's a sobering thought.
 

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To the OP, I could have written your question 3 years ago when I started ADV riding. My background is similar to yours. 30 years of road riding and roadracing. I'm used to "leathers" and a suit that is form-fitting.

Doesn't quit work that way with ADV gear and for good reason if you do a lot of "off-road" like I do (50/50). ADV gear like Klim offers alot more freedom of movement which is needed to maneuver your bike off-road. For on-road you really want the abrasion protection in the event of sliding on the pavement. The materials Klim uses seems to do a decent job. But its not the same as leather as you see in the above pictures it can "grind" through. BUT on dirt that isn't so much an issue. I've gone down a few times in the dirt and the suit doesn't suffer near the abrasion. IMO, its more important to have impact protection off-road as there are rocks and uneven terrain...

In any event, I wear Klim. I have several of their "suits" to account for all kinds of climate/temps. While I find their fit to be a bit on the "baggy" or "loose fit" side, I find that helps them to breathe. I also find most of their stuff is basically a "shell" and you can put the base layers on of your choosing as opposed to being stuck with what most 3 or 4 season suits include which may not be to your liking. I also like that most of their suits are waterproof. So no need to dismount, dig in your pack for the waterproof outer liner or inner liner, take the gear off and put on the rain gear. Just stop and zip up the vents with Klim...

IMO, the euro stuff like Rev'it, Alpinestars, Dainese, etc are very form fitting and I feel won't allow air to circulate around the suit.

Now with that said, I still feel that the "armor" won't stay in place during an on-road crash. Too much room for them to move around... I've not found any ADV suit that I feel will keep the armor in place in an on-road crash.
 

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I have a KLIM Badlands pro jacket and the mesh Induction jacket. Also the Adventure Rally pants. Bought the Badlands second-hand (used) and the Rally pants from someone who bought and wore them once (still had the tags on), and the Inversion jacket brand new. It's top gear!

They all fit well, have excellent armour, and are comfy and well ventilated. I use the mesh jacket for commuting in the city and offroad in warm weather. The Badlands pants and Rally pants for touring so I no longer have to carry extra rain gear (pain in the butt).

They are really expensive but really are the best. I've had Alpinestars, First Gear, Icon and Tourmaster gear as well - Klim is the best I've worn.
 

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I currently have a spidi ht raid jacket that i got on sale for about $400. It is a fairly tight fitting, has very think leather on the arms and back, a pocket for a camelback bladder and clips for attaching ce armor. It also has groin straps so I am pretty sure it would hold up pretty well in a lowside. It also has two liners a water proof one and a full thermal liner that is very warm. The venting on it is also excellent. Overall I have been very impressed with the quality and comfort of the jacket and will try and get the spidi pants when I can find them at a reasonable price.
 
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