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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Had a nylon covered wire press right through my new rear wheel yesterday on my way home from work.


Bike became snaky so I pulled off & found the object stuck in my tyre.


Now I am thinking if I had the pressure sensors installed already which I have ordered on ebay, I would have been warned long before it went flat.


I am posing the question:


If you are aware of the puncture in time before it goes flat, could you not have something like a plug to seal the hole the moment you pull the object out?


Surely the tube is compressed against the tyre still, so a plug of some sort should be able to enter the tube without collapsing & seal the tube from the inside against the tyre wall?


The pressure should force it to seal better..?


Anyone have some ideas here..?
 

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puncture

usually tube tires loose the air very quickly, because of all the unsealed wholes for the spokes. so, I'm afraid a tpms won't warn you early enough to have time for some additional millage. by the fact the tube is moving against the tire constantly while driving a plug for tubeless tires won't work either. the best chance beside repairing the tube on the road side would give you seal&inflate fluids - if you could remove the part causing the puncture and the whole is small enough you could be lucky and ride some more miles but, it's not guaranteed. so far, so bad - cheers
 

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.... and just how difficult is it to repair a tubed tyre by the roadside. I mean here for us general bikers who have never fixed a tyre before.
I am going on a long trip and have bought a front and rear spare tube, but I am really carrying these only so that someone who knows what they are doing (and has the right tools) could put a new tube in for me if I manage to call them out.
Presumably the standard toolkit does not have suitable tools for taking axles out?
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The truth of the matter is, repairing tubed tyres at the roadside SUCKS, let's say it's raining as well..


The amount of extra tools you need to log around is also ridiculous!!


Only time tubed tyres are an advantage is when you are out in middle of nowhere & you damage a tyre badly...


99 % of the time you could plug a tubeless & get going..


Now one thing is must say bmw have done well is to make tubeless spoke rims, this is something that Honda could do for the AT for sure..!!!!!!!


You could also solve a ripped tyre on these tubeless rims by taking a tube with for extreme cases in nowhere land.. therefore why are they still making bluming tubed rims %^$%^$$$!?


This is the only real grudge I have with this bike...


I have had many punctures with tubeless tyres which I have plugged & went on for hundreds of km's after that, no problem..
 

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Hey guys, Honda fitted spoked wheels on the Africa Queen with the intent that they would be pounded off road. Extruded rims have far more ductility and tensile strength than cast tubeless wheels. As to puncture repair, those of us who rode and competed off road all our lives know that tube repairs are not too bad and can generally be done in a few minutes, without removing the wheel. You need to carry tube patches and know how to use them. You can probably find a youtube video of Bud Ekins fixing a puncture at the ISDT in under 5 minutes.
If you are only riding on tarmac, buy a road bike. When I ride the highway, I take my ST1300. It rules the road.
 

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I have a tube repair kit in my (ridiculously small) toolbox. Used them a lot in the past. Easy and fast if the tube isn't ripped. But.... You cannot use a patch on some heavy duty tubes. They just will not stick because of the rubber composition. I also carry spare tubes. The debate over tubed vs tubeless is never ending.
 

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If Honda gave the option of tubed or tubeless I bet not many would go for tubed. For a tubed puncture it has to be a call for help - if you have a signal ! Like others have said repairing a tubed puncture at the roadside is a really bad day in my book
 

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I have an Outex kit, I will be fitting it soon. I will then have 2 near new tubes that I could use if I had to for fixing a really badly damaged tyre. I hate tubes and have no desire to stick with them, even if my bike has spoked wheels.
 

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I have an Outex kit, I will be fitting it soon. I will then have 2 near new tubes that I could use if I had to for fixing a really badly damaged tyre. I hate tubes and have no desire to stick with them, even if my bike has spoked wheels.
This^^^

Seal your wheels, run tubeless specific tires, mind the fact that the front wheel has no safety bead, (or buy new wheels), and carry one spare tube and levers when you plan an off road trip to no man's land. A perfect solution.
 

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AS far as I know plugging a tubed tyre is not possible; however, fixing a puncture roadside, or out bush, is not that bad a job - unless you are in 45 degree heat with sweat running into your eyes and flies crawling all over your face and in your ears! But I can see where Honda are coming from using tubed rims: they are sturdy, and simple in construction - which is what you need when you are hundreds of miles from help. Having said all that, I would prefer the simplicity of tubeless, because you can always carry an inner tube with you if you do seriously tear a tyre or damage a rim - not sure what it would be like to get a tubeless tyre bead back on the rim with a hand-pump in the middle of nowhere though because I have never done it. The only real advantage of running tubes that I can see is that they allow you to run significantly lower pressures without the risk of the bead coming off the rim.
 

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You could carry a patch kit and fix the tube on the roadside. Longer journeys carry an extra tube or both of them. It is a pain but in 45,000 kilometres on two tubed bikes I've only had to change the tube twice (the same one failed after patch repair).
 

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Most often it is the rear that gets punctured - the front runs over something and stands it up, the rear says 'yes please' and eats it. I was a tireman for some years...

From what I've read, Outex kit works decently in the rear but not so much on the front because of rim width and more specifically, width of the centre drop. Besides, tubeless fronts cab burp out air when running lower pressures on gravel or offroad.

So, perhaps best of both worlds - get an Outex kit for the rear and run a tube front. The tubed front is much easier to repair, and you can plug the rear.

No, you cannot plug a tubed tyre to repair or slow down a leak, and in my experience slime or similar in a tube ultimately creates a mess inside the tyre if you do get a puncture. Remember, the tube moves around in the tyre, so at best the slime slows down the leak rate initially but ultimately the tyre goes flat. You can't patch a tube thats had slime in it and you have to clean up the tyre or the new tube will stick and may get you a crease-flat.
 

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I have fitted an Outex kit, front and rear and have just returned from a 5 500 km trip where I added only a slight amount of air once to the tyres- no more than anyone else on the same trip with standard tubeless tyres on their bikes. I asked around about the no safety bead on the front wheel as Niterunner has raised and the response I got makes sense. If you got a puncture in the front wheel, then how is a quickly deflating tube going to keep it on the wheel anyway? In many respects it's the same thing only with a tube it will deflate much more quickly on most occasions. Fair point I believe.

This trip was on bitumen and I had Scorpion Trail 2, Pirelli tyres fitted before we left. These bikes were flogged through twisty windy mountain roads and the tyres performed admirably. No sign of them letting go of the rim or losing air. I mean this Outex kit was tested. On many occasions we were going around 70 km/hr turns at 120 ish and everything performed as it should.

In fact, the AT was that impressive that two guys on a VFR 800 and Tiger (road) 800 are considering trading across to the Honda, the bike handled so well. Honestly, I wouldn't spend the money on tubeless rims, I think you'd be pleasantly surprised how well the kit works. Skip D from this forum has also used the kit and has now done over 20 000 km without incident.

In short, the Outex kit works if you want a tubeless solution for your AT.

Cheers

Wadeo

Keep the shiny side up!!!!
 

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In short, the Outex kit works if you want a tubeless solution for your AT.
I should put the Outex kit on my rims, how long did it take you to put yours on?

My Outex kit is still sitting here in my bedroom, just got to put my AT on the centre stand and remove each wheel, remove the tyres and tubes, clean up the rims and put on Outex kit, put tyres back on and put the wheels back on the bike.

I have some 90/90 R21 tyres from my previous bike (one that hasn't even been mounted) which are TT (Tube Type) tyres. Does anyone have experience with using TT tyres without tubes?
 

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I should put the Outex kit on my rims, how long did it take you to put yours on?

My Outex kit is still sitting here in my bedroom, just got to put my AT on the centre stand and remove each wheel, remove the tyres and tubes, clean up the rims and put on Outex kit, put tyres back on and put the wheels back on the bike.

I have some 90/90 R21 tyres from my previous bike (one that hasn't even been mounted) which are TT (Tube Type) tyres. Does anyone have experience with using TT tyres without tubes?


Outex don’t recommend using Tubed Tyre with their kit, they say you should use a Tubeless Tyre.

I’ve also got the AT Outex kit and once I get my ATAS (should’ve been today, but it’s not in the country yet :crying:), I’ll be using the Avon Trailrider Tubeless tyre.
 

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Totally agree with using a proper tubeless tyre once you've converted the rims.

Process for using Outex is simple but takes time. Allow about 2 hours roughly. Smoothed out air bubbles using the back of a spoon once the tape was applied to the rim. Don't bother with grinding down the back of the spokes with a file unless you feel a sharp edge.

Good luck with the process. I'm glad mines done now.

Cheers

Wadeo
 

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What happens with Outex when you adjust the spokes for tension? The nipples have to spin in the rim. Does the Outex rim tape still allow the nipples to move? Does moving the nipples damage the rim tape?
... inquiring minds...
 

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What happens with Outex when you adjust the spokes for tension? The nipples have to spin in the rim. Does the Outex rim tape still allow the nipples to move? Does moving the nipples damage the rim tape?
... inquiring minds...
There are little nipple patches that you put on top of the spoke nipple. That enables you to adjust the spokes by turning the nipple without damageing the Outex Gel layer.
 
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