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I should put the Outex kit on my rims, how long did it take you to put yours on?

My Outex kit is still sitting here in my bedroom, just got to put my AT on the centre stand and remove each wheel, remove the tyres and tubes, clean up the rims and put on Outex kit, put tyres back on and put the wheels back on the bike.

I have some 90/90 R21 tyres from my previous bike (one that hasn't even been mounted) which are TT (Tube Type) tyres. Does anyone have experience with using TT tyres without tubes?
Most tires that I have say "Tubless (for tube type rim fit a tube)" !!! how is that for common sense
 

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As to puncture repair, those of us who rode and competed off road all our lives know that tube repairs are not too bad and can generally be done in a few minutes, without removing the wheel.
Since it will only take a few minutes, how about video of you doing it on your africa twin? Front or rear. Rear would impress me more, but front would be more useful, since I don't have a tube in back of mine.
 

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I would also love to see a tube repair done without removing the rim! I've never seen it done and can't imagine being able to.
 

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If you can prop the bike up so the wheel rotates (or lay the bike on it's side).
Locate puncture point.
Pop bead and remove tire enough to get to the tube.
Remove any foreign objects.
Patch the tube.
Put it back together.



I would also love to see a tube repair done without removing the rim! I've never seen it done and can't imagine being able to.
 

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If you can prop the bike up so the wheel rotates (or lay the bike on it's side).
Locate puncture point.
Pop bead and remove tire enough to get to the tube.
Remove any foreign objects.
Patch the tube.
Put it back together.
Countless dirt riders have been doing it this way since tubes were invented:wink2:
 

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Countless dirt riders have been doing it this way since tubes were invented:wink2:
I've done it on a bicycle. But if you can do it in minutes on the AT, I still want to see video. See exactly how and with what equipment--hopefully stuff that's reasonable to carry in your repair kit, and hopefully with the bike on the centerstand, but if you gotta lay it on the ground, that's OK too.
 

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I've done it on a bicycle. But if you can do it in minutes on the AT, I still want to see video. See exactly how and with what equipment--hopefully stuff that's reasonable to carry in your repair kit, and hopefully with the bike on the centerstand, but if you gotta lay it on the ground, that's OK too.
It is not rocket science. It is done the same as if the wheel is off the bike. You can leave it on the center stand or lay it down. Just tire iron one bead off the rim and pull the tube, check the tire for the thorn, nail or whatever and patch the tube. Pry the bead back on and go ride You cannot remove the tube, so it only works if a patch will fix it.
I suggest you practice it at home, once or twice if you are new to repairing punctures. Just remember to practice with the tire tools you carry on the bike.
BTW- years ago a company used to sell quick change tubes for enduro riders that were linear, so the tube could be replaced without removing the wheel. I know they still make this type of tube for mountain bicycles.
 

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I forgot about those.
I never have seen one but do remember them being available.



It is not rocket science. It is done the same as if the wheel is off the bike. You can leave it on the center stand or lay it down. Just tire iron one bead off the rim and pull the tube, check the tire for the thorn, nail or whatever and patch the tube. Pry the bead back on and go ride You cannot remove the tube, so it only works if a patch will fix it.
I suggest you practice it at home, once or twice if you are new to repairing punctures. Just remember to practice with the tire tools you carry on the bike.
BTW- years ago a company used to sell quick change tubes for enduro riders that were linear, so the tube could be replaced without removing the wheel. I know they still make this type of tube for mountain bicycles.
 

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Outex don’t recommend using Tubed Tyre with their kit, they say you should use a Tubeless Tyre.
I'm pretty sure that this would be the recommendation from EVERY manufacturer of any tubeless wheels. It would be irresponsible to not mention this. BUT - I have run a Mitas E07 TT tyre with the Neutech Tubliss system and it worked fine. Sure, I had to add air if the bike was sitting for a few weeks - but I was able to ride for 2 weeks, covering ~2,500km, without adding air. I am aware that the Tubless system works a bit differently from sealing the wheel, but still I have used a TT tyre without a normal tube.

Only using tubeless tyres does limit the options. Mitas E07 21 inch tyres do come in TT & TL versions, but the local importer doesn't have stock of the TL version, I'm unsure of how easily they can get one in.

When buying a new 21" front tyre I'll probably ensure it is a TL version though. Avon make a 90/10 tyre & a 50/50 tyre that are TL (or they say can be run with or without a tube) and the local importer lists those tyres as being available, so I do have options available. But I do have a couple of tyres that look pretty usable except for the TT designation. I'm OK with regularly checking the tyre pressure (like before every ride) if using these tyres, as long as problems are very unlikely.

My suspicion is that these tyres would lose pressure faster than TL tyres and would need very regular checking/adjusting of air pressure, but that they would probably work just fine.

I know that I could just run a tube in the front with the 2 tyres I have that I'd like to use and then go tubeless once they are worn out and replaced by TL tyres. But I really do hate tubes and failure with a tube can be more dangerous than the slow loss of air when not using a tube. I'd love to hear from anyone that has run a TT tyre in a tubeless rim (without using a tube) to find out what their experience was like.
 

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What happens with Outex when you adjust the spokes for tension? The nipples have to spin in the rim. Does the Outex rim tape still allow the nipples to move? Does moving the nipples damage the rim tape?
... inquiring minds...
yep.. they have taped heads..it's in their procedure. Deflate, adjust, reinflate.
Also why would you have issus with the front tire? I had no issues with mine
https://thetenerist.wordpress.com/2018/01/01/honda-africa-twin-outex-install/
 

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It looks like you have put the standard tyres back on. They are TT (Tube Type) according to what is written on the sidewalls, have you had any issues running them without tubes? Do you have to add air more often?
Hi Mark,
For the front I put the tube back in, since it has no ridge. The back is as is.
The bike has been in the garage all winter, with no pressure loss.
The front sat without a tube for a week. No issues either.

Greg
 

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Hi Mark,
For the front I put the tube back in, since it has no ridge. The back is as is.
The bike has been in the garage all winter, with no pressure loss.
The front sat without a tube for a week. No issues either.

Greg
In all seriousness, can someone explain to me how having a tube in the front tyre is somehow going to keep the tyre on the rim if it deflates? I really can not see how that is any safer, if anything a tube will deflate rapidly and the tyre is more of a chance of coming off compared to when an Outex tubeless kit is used. Most punctures with tubeless deflate slowly and as my mechanic said, if it is a nail you can usually ride on and worry about it later as the leak can often be slow. A nail in a tube on the other hand is often a quick death.

Cheers

Wadeo
 

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In all seriousness, can someone explain to me how having a tube in the front tyre is somehow going to keep the tyre on the rim if it deflates? I really can not see how that is any safer, if anything a tube will deflate rapidly and the tyre is more of a chance of coming off compared to when an Outex tubeless kit is used. Most punctures with tubeless deflate slowly and as my mechanic said, if it is a nail you can usually ride on and worry about it later as the leak can often be slow. A nail in a tube on the other hand is often a quick death.

Cheers

Wadeo
The point is that the front rim on the AT does not have a safety bead to hold a tubeless tire on the rim properly. Most wheel experts do not recommend sealing a rim for tubeless that does not have this safety bead. Some might still choose to seal it and use a tubeless tire, AND put a tube in. Why? Not because a tube helps hold the tire on the rim. Rather, as a safety measure against either a fast blowout from a puncture or fast blowout from the tire suddenly losing its seal on the rim (highly unlikely both would happen together at the same time).
 

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Tubes: Useful as an emergency repair device. Silly to keep them between your wheels & tyres though, they could get damaged there.

I will get around to installing my Outex kit and hang on to my tubes for emergency repair. I'll put a TL tyre on the rear straight away (probably an E07) but I'll use one of my TT front tyres and just regularly check the pressure. I have a 90/90/21 E07 that is only half worn (if that) and a brand new IRC GP-21F that looks like it might work OK for a bit of gravel riding.
 

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Outex fitted last week and nice new pair of Scorpion tyres fitted. Was running TA2 previously with tubes. I have not read anything to convince me the lack of a safety rim on the front wheel is a deal breaker and having run TA2 for 5k miles with no problem I would need alot of convincing what i'm doing is less safe than having a puncture on the front with tubes at 60mph.....which is really unpleasant!! Happy for a genuine expert to tell me different.
 

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The point is that the front rim on the AT does not have a safety bead to hold a tubeless tire on the rim properly. Most wheel experts do not recommend sealing a rim for tubeless that does not have this safety bead. Some might still choose to seal it and use a tubeless tire, AND put a tube in. Why? Not because a tube helps hold the tire on the rim. Rather, as a safety measure against either a fast blowout from a puncture or fast blowout from the tire suddenly losing its seal on the rim (highly unlikely both would happen together at the same time).
Yeah, that won't make any difference. You get a nail in a tube and the air will leak right out around the valve stem. As to a safety rim? What holds the tire on the rime when the tube gets a hole in it? Nothing. Same issue as if it were tubeless. I've had 4 flats on the front with the stock Dumbflats, (without a puncture to the tire) and I can attest to the trouble it is to change/fix out in the dirt, or old deserted road, or parking lot, or sand wash. I tossed the stock tires with 3K miles on them.

The low profile of the stock tire is likely a bigger help than having a tube in it.
 

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Outex fitted last week and nice new pair of Scorpion tyres fitted. Was running TA2 previously with tubes. I have not read anything to convince me the lack of a safety rim on the front wheel is a deal breaker and having run TA2 for 5k miles with no problem I would need alot of convincing what i'm doing is less safe than having a puncture on the front with tubes at 60mph.....which is really unpleasant!! Happy for a genuine expert to tell me different.
Hi Gas man, do you still have your AT and still in London?
 
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