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Yes. Ive had it for two years now and done 22k miles. Been all round Europe and also use it for work in town going to clients. it has proved to be a great all rounder and have no intention at the moment to change it. Other than Outex the only other real alteration is fitting a Hyperpro spring which I think has helped a lot. The OEM was far too soft IMO
 

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Yes. Ive had it for two years now and done 22k miles. Been all round Europe and also use it for work in town going to clients. it has proved to be a great all rounder and have no intention at the moment to change it. Other than Outex the only other real alteration is fitting a Hyperpro spring which I think has helped a lot. The OEM was far too soft IMO
Thanks Gas Man and good to hear the outex is working so well for you. I was leaning towards the 3M route but the ease of the Outex istempting. I had just figured that I could do it more securely with 3M.
You mentioned in another post you had it done at Honda Chiswick. Mind if I ask where you bought the outex and how much it was and how it cost for them to fit it?
I take it you did the front and rear conversion?
Thanks,
VT
 

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Hi,
I have heard 3M is just as good and would have had no problems using it but got Outex because it came as a complete package, valves etc (and lovely white gloves!) so was chosen simply for ease and obviously has a proven track record. Basically i'm time poor and bloody lazy! I bought it off ebay for approx £130 and paid around £100 to fit it if I remember rightly. Again, time poor and bloody lazy! Correct I did both front and rear. On my original wheels I ran the Dunlops for 8k, then went with Conti TA2 with the tubes which are a great tyre and then with the Outex going onto my new wheels (courtesy of warranty) I thought I would try the Scorpion which have also been great. If your question about front and rear concerns the safety aspect on the front or rather supposed lack of then I have not heard one convincing argument from anyone why it should be a problem with no tube and TL tyres. And I have not experienced a problem unlike with tubes. My logic is that if you hit a nail on tubeless you have half a chance of losing no pressure at all or maybe a slow pressure loss whereas if you have tubes its pretty much instant pressure loss regardless.....as I have experienced once. Personally I don't get tubes and think they are relics from another age. If your going off road I would still prefer tubeless....you can always take a pair of tubes with you just in case you get in the sh1t and bust your rim. Just my personal opinion! ps Chiswick Honda are great and Mark and Paul are really helpful and knowledgeable. Pavel the mechanic owns an AT, has fitted Outex on his and other customers and knows the bike really well. Good luck
 

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Outex just arrived today, so the next order of business is to decide what new tires to try, as the original Dunlops are pretty-well toast. An 80/20 would be ideal for my riding, and I am intrigued by the new dual compound Anakee Adventure given that I have had great luck with the dual-compound Elite 4 on my Wing, but not so available just yet. Will want something that gives at least a solid 5,000 plus miles, and given that I live in Oregon, it will need to move water. Dare I ask thoughts?
 

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Hi,
I have heard 3M is just as good and would have had no problems using it but got Outex because it came as a complete package, valves etc (and lovely white gloves!) so was chosen simply for ease and obviously has a proven track record. Basically i'm time poor and bloody lazy! I bought it off ebay for approx £130 and paid around £100 to fit it if I remember rightly. Again, time poor and bloody lazy! Correct I did both front and rear. On my original wheels I ran the Dunlops for 8k, then went with Conti TA2 with the tubes which are a great tyre and then with the Outex going onto my new wheels (courtesy of warranty) I thought I would try the Scorpion which have also been great. If your question about front and rear concerns the safety aspect on the front or rather supposed lack of then I have not heard one convincing argument from anyone why it should be a problem with no tube and TL tyres. And I have not experienced a problem unlike with tubes. My logic is that if you hit a nail on tubeless you have half a chance of losing no pressure at all or maybe a slow pressure loss whereas if you have tubes its pretty much instant pressure loss regardless.....as I have experienced once. Personally I don't get tubes and think they are relics from another age. If your going off road I would still prefer tubeless....you can always take a pair of tubes with you just in case you get in the sh1t and bust your rim. Just my personal opinion! ps Chiswick Honda are great and Mark and Paul are really helpful and knowledgeable. Pavel the mechanic owns an AT, has fitted Outex on his and other customers and knows the bike really well. Good luck
Thanks very much Gas man.
I basically just want to do it myself so I can have a go at taking the wheels off the bike and changing tires. Never did it before on a bike but have done many car tires when I had a summer job in a garage when I was 15 lol. Though that was using lots of nice power tools that made even changing Pirelli P zero's a piece of cake. 230£ all in sounds like a very decent price though. If I manage to do everything with 3M plus the tools I'll need to buy (beadbreaker, rim shield etc)for under 230 I'll be happy, then I'll save on future tire changes and learn a new skill.
Never did any of the work myself on the Varadero but for some reason the AT makes me want to get my hands dirty haha
 

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Good luck. Remember......... it is all in the prep!!!
Thanks. Any chance you have a copy of the instructions from outex on the prep? And do you remember the size of the tape? I got a 5m roll of the 3m 4412 at 5cm wide so will age to cut for the front. Thanks!
 

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Sorry, havent kept anything. When i say prep i mean getting that wheel clean enough to eat your dinner off!! I would also create some sort of set up whereby you can spin the wheel as you afix the tape.
 

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Sorry, havent kept anything. When i say prep i mean getting that wheel clean enough to eat your dinner off!! I would also create some sort of set up whereby you can spin the wheel as you afix the tape.
Spin the wheel??? That's going to be the gf's job, although she doesn't know it yet! Thought of doing it rim on bike but I want to do it inside where its warmer.


Apart from cleaning, did it recommend to sand the rim at all or rough it up?
Thanks,
 

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I dont remember it saying anything but obviously you may need to smooth down the heads of any spokes that have any sharp edges.
 

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Hi,

Regarding punctures. Have you see this instant puncture sealer which apparently can also be used with inner tubes. https://bikeseal.co.uk/. Demo videos here: https://bikeseal.co.uk/demos/


My local UK Honda Dealer is raving about it. Here is video of a demonstration at another UK motorbike gear retailer

There is a review here. https://rideexpeditions.com/bike-seal-puncture-prevention-review/

I am ordering some but I guess I am not going to know how good it is until I get a puncture. If does what it says on the tin it could be a good all round solution.

Cheers
Neil
 

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I am ordering some but I guess I am not going to know how good it is until I get a puncture.
You could test it at home, so you don't get stranded on a ride. If you don't want to do it initially, you could do it before your next tire change. See if it will repair a hole from a screw or big nail.

I have a healthy skepticism of tire sealants in inner tubes, at least for repairing other than tiny punctures. Slime works well on bicycles for thorn punctures. But what it doesn't fix, it makes much harder to patch.
 

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I have found that the tube style rims lack a sufficient center drop in the rim to remove a stiff walled tube less tire. At the time of purchase I could not find a 50/50 tire in a tubed variety to replace the stock tube style street tires. The fast solution was to put a tube less tire onto the rim with a tube inside. As luck would have it, I took a construction staple in the rear. To get home, slime into the tube, spin tire several times to coat the hole, add air and limp home. Once home removed tire and attempted to break the bead. Yeah, lets just say I need more practice and better spoons. I guess it can be done with some adrenaline but after an hours struggle the whole wheel went to the local shop $25 well spent.
 

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Once home removed tire and attempted to break the bead.
I assume you're talking about the rear tire. To break the bead to replace the original tire, I lowered my car on to it.

When I needed to break the bead on the TL replacement, lowering the car wasn't enough. Nor were the too flimsy ratcheting clamps I tried. I used a proper tire machine bead breaker to do it, no problem.

Maybe bead breaker tire levers would have handled it. Dunno. Or clamp type bead breaker for carrying on a bike.

I guess it can be done with some adrenaline
Haven't tried that. I did try profanity though, and it didn't help.
 

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I am not ready to do mine yet, but I opened it so I could scan them for you. Problem is that the max size is 20 of upload, and the file is 920. Give me your email address and I will send them.
 

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Could anyone tell me basically the pros and cons between Tubliss and the Outex kit and which tires would then be used, because I'm getting a bit lost !?
 

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Could anyone tell me basically the pros and cons between Tubliss and the Outex kit and which tires would then be used, because I'm getting a bit lost !?
To my understanding, the Tubliss keeps the tire safely fit in place on rims that do not have the appropriate geometry feature to hold it in place. The AT back rim does have a small hump to keep the tire in place while the front one does not. So in an event of pressure loss, the tire may get out of the rim.

The OUTEX (or similar solutions using ussualy 3M sealant and tape) does not offer this feature. This is why, specifically for the front wheel, it is recomended to keep the tube along with the OUTEX kit.

Maybe I am wrong, but the Tubliss is not recomended for heavy big trails, though.
 

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Cons of Tubliss? isn't designed to fit AT width rims so not an option for stock rim width (or wider) .
Tyres? if you remove the tube and fit a tubeless conversion you need to fit tubeless tyres. If you fit tubes you can still fit tubeless tyres though some may be a bit rough on the inside and could chaff the tube causing punctures. KTM fitted Tubeless tyres with tubes as oem to its KTM9x0Adventures.
Cons of an AT with a front wheel Tubeless conversion (no tube fitted) : Tyre can come off rim if theres a sudden/significant deflation .
Cons of an AT with a std Tube tyre front wheel (no conversions) : Tyre can come of the rim if theres a sudden/significant deflation.
Subjective thoughts (IMO) Tubes can deflate suddenly if a nail/similar causes a large enough hole, Tubeless tyres tend to deflate slower due to nail/penetrating object sealing the hole in some manner.
There are exceptions that will allow a tube to slowly deflate and a tubeless tyre to suddenly deflate Neither are guaranteed to stop the tyre coming off the rim seat. On a tubeless rim the bead ridge is an aid to stopping the tyre coming out of the seat its not infallible. A deflated tube wont stop a tyre coming off the rim seat, it doesn't have any capability of doing that without the air pressure, the physical presence of a flat tube will just move if there's enough force to shift the tyre bead .
 

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Cons of Tubliss? isn't designed to fit AT width rims so not an option for stock rim width (or wider) .
Tyres? if you remove the tube and fit a tubeless conversion you need to fit tubeless tyres. If you fit tubes you can still fit tubeless tyres though some may be a bit rough on the inside and could chaff the tube causing punctures. KTM fitted Tubeless tyres with tubes as oem to its KTM9x0Adventures.
Cons of an AT with a front wheel Tubeless conversion (no tube fitted) : Tyre can come off rim if theres a sudden/significant deflation .
Cons of an AT with a std Tube tyre front wheel (no conversions) : Tyre can come of the rim if theres a sudden/significant deflation.
Subjective thoughts (IMO) Tubes can deflate suddenly if a nail/similar causes a large enough hole, Tubeless tyres tend to deflate slower due to nail/penetrating object sealing the hole in some manner.
There are exceptions that will allow a tube to slowly deflate and a tubeless tyre to suddenly deflate Neither are guaranteed to stop the tyre coming off the rim seat. On a tubeless rim the bead ridge is an aid to stopping the tyre coming out of the seat its not infallible. A deflated tube wont stop a tyre coming off the rim seat, it doesn't have any capability of doing that without the air pressure, the physical presence of a flat tube will just move if there's enough force to shift the tyre bead .
Thanks for this thorough explanation, what comes to my mind then, is making the tubeless conversion with the Outex kit and put slime in the TL tire, then it should be
as safe as one can get no !?
 
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