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Thanks for this thorough explanation, what comes to my mind then, is making the tubeless conversion with the Outex kit and put slime in the TL tire, then it should be
as safe as one can get no !?
Possibly. However some further personal thoughts on the matter . I haven't converted my AT(AS) to tubeless (just a matter of time) I have done numerous "ghetto" tubeless conversion on Mountain bike rims. Later ones I've just used Gorilla tape over the spoke bed and Stans tubeless sealer to cater for punctures and tyre bead rim fit tolerances when 1st inflating. When I've come to refresh these a year or so later (as the sealer forms lumps and dries out) I've found that its started to affect the tapes glue on the edges where it got under the tape edge and reduced /removed the stickiness in that area. Over time this may encroach into the nipple area and cause a leak. On an Outex/3M type conversion the nipple heads are further sealed but the thought is there that any fluids in the sealer could impair the nipple sealing over time. I have heard some sealer fluids are corrosive to alloys so that is also a consideration.
YMMV or
How much risk aversion do you feel is required :) .
 

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The truth of the matter is, repairing tubed tyres at the roadside SUCKS, let's say it's raining as well..


The amount of extra tools you need to log around is also ridiculous!!


Only time tubed tyres are an advantage is when you are out in middle of nowhere & you damage a tyre badly...


99 % of the time you could plug a tubeless & get going..


Now one thing is must say bmw have done well is to make tubeless spoke rims, this is something that Honda could do for the AT for sure..!!!!!!!


You could also solve a ripped tyre on these tubeless rims by taking a tube with for extreme cases in nowhere land.. therefore why are they still making bluming tubed rims %^$%^$$$!?


This is the only real grudge I have with this bike...


I have had many punctures with tubeless tyres which I have plugged & went on for hundreds of km's after that, no problem..
If you damage a rim then a tubless will never ever seal on rim. But if you have a tube it will get you home for sure.!!!!! Well done honda
 

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Beowulf, you must share. :unsure:
It's possible...
In all you need to extract the tube is one side of the tire off the rim, I’m certain it can be done and the tube patched, but three issues, short enough spoons to pry the wheel and not hit parts of the bike, most ppl replace the tube and spooning the tire back on without pinching the tube is hard enough with the wheel off...
Easier to drop the wheel and use my trick to put it back on, just need some string or zip ties and a branch.. One finger rear wheel lift trick..
 

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In all you need to extract the tube is one side of the tire off the rim, I’m certain it can be done and the tube patched, but three issues, short enough spoons to pry the wheel and not hit parts of the bike, most ppl replace the tube and spooning the tire back on without pinching the tube is hard enough with the wheel off
lol ... I am pretty confident with the said appropriate tools and while the tire is on the bike that I would pinch the tube. :rolleyes:
 

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Saw a video series about a couple of English brothers who went to India and rented RE Bullets to ride to China. One had a puncture on the rear and the Indian mechanic just removed one side, patched the tube, and put it back on without removing the wheel. I wouldn't want to try that with a bigger tire size, though.
 

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If you damage a rim then a tubless will never ever seal on rim. But if you have a tube it will get you home for sure.!!!!! Well done honda
Not so, on my last trip about half way I bent the front rim bad enough that the spokes where hitting the left brake caliper, rim also had a severe bulge at one point and a couple of other bendy bits where it had made contact with rocks. I beat it with a hammer and adjusted spokes to pull it back into shape, when I got it home 3k km later I beat it some more and adjusted spokes again never lost any air at all. Outex tubless conversion running 22 PSI, Shinko 804 front.
 

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Beowulf, you must share. :unsure:

No pics, but the last time I was foolish enough to try (and succeed) was on a 1972 Moto Guzzi Eldorado quite a few years back Dunlop K181.

Riding from Carbondale IL to High Bridge Kentucky, out in the stix.

Put it on the center-stand and jammed some debris (rocks, wood) under the oil pan to hold the front wheel off the ground a little. I used a c-clamp that I just recently quit carrying to break the bead on one side only, worked it off the rim with a couple of spoons, loosend the schrader valve and was able to fish the tube out enough to tighten up the schrader valve and genltly inflate it and spot the puncture. (nail or carpet tack...)

Found the little bugger in the tire and pried it out. Put a cold patch (basically a bicycle patch) on the tube, stuffed it back in kind of carefully, with the schrader valve removed. Put the valve back in loose, inflated the tube a little to take the wrinkles out, let the air seep back out, and then carefully spooned the removed bead back on. Tightened up the schrader valve, inflated to "hard". Bead popped back in, rode home.

Had a hand pump that took something like forever to get back to pressure, but worked.

Not much fun, but it beat walking, and I was just too lazy to take the wheel all the way off that lovely drum brake setup. Fender was in the way, but not unmanageable.

Would I do it again? Probably not; but I'm still lazy!
 

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Not so, on my last trip about half way I bent the front rim bad enough that the spokes where hitting the left brake caliper, rim also had a severe bulge at one point and a couple of other bendy bits where it had made contact with rocks. I beat it with a hammer and adjusted spokes to pull it back into shape, when I got it home 3k km later I beat it some more and adjusted spokes again never lost any air at all. Outex tubless conversion running 22 PSI, Shinko 804 front.
A decent shared experience.
 
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