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In my area motorcycle shops, as a rule, do not repair punctured motorcycle tires regardless of whether the puncture is in the tread or sidewall, tubeless or tubed, two seasons old or one day old. Strangely enough some of the automotive tire shops will repair a motorcycle tire if the puncture is small and not near or in the sidewall. I am located in Ontario, Canada. I know tire technology has come a long ways since I started riding over 40 years ago. The same applies to tire/tube repair materials as well. Collectively riders and drivers used to fix flats without reservation, so why the refusals to fix a flat now? What is the experience of riders in other countries?
 

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Shops near me likewise will not patch/plug them either due to the liabilities. Much like with all wheel drive cars how they will insist you have to replace all 4 beyond a certain tread depth. Everyone is careful about covering their own butts. There are a couple small shops, usually single owner that may do it, but I don't know any of the bigger shops/dealers around me that will do it.

That said, it's not really a big deal with a tubed tire as long as the tire isn't compromised. I picked up a nail on a front tire a couple years ago. Put a new tube in it and rode it out until it needed to be replaced.

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For a tubeless, I will only repair a puncture that's within the central 3/5ths, so sufficiently away from the side walls. The hole must be clean with no sign of tearing. So caused by a nail or screw or similarly sharp pointy object and 6mm across or less. This for a permanent repair anything else would be a "get me home - ride with extreme caution" and then replace the tyre ASAP.

I would err on the side of caution with a tubed puncture and treat is as a "get me through today" kinda thing.. And if the tube keeps the air perhaps look at replacing it as soon as is practical. My concern would always be a sudden failure of the patch at speed. Tubes aren't exactly expensive.
 

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And those without centre stands get a massive added bonus. They get to lie their bikes on its side, preferably on mud... But grass will do as second best, which obviously means a photo opportunity. Who doesn't enjoy the sheer novelty of an Africa twin on its side? Wheel off and another photo. With so much kudos to be gained its a wonder more people don't actively seek out punctures!! Or offer them as a service.
 

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I know I'm going of the thread, our motorcycle club recently held a tyre repair workshop to educate on tyre matters. I was absolutely staggers to see how thin some brand/model casings are in the centre of the tread area compared with others. Whether plugging a tubeless or puncture resistance of a tubed tyre, I see this as significant when choosing new tyres. An example showed a Bridgestone that was very thick with lots of steel against a Michelin that had no steel and was very thin, This is nothing negative about Michelin as I always loved the brand, more about the tyre model. I understand that tyre repairers know all about this and are the people we should be listening to when deciding on our next tyres.
 

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AT riders don't use freeways, they always go down the river and through the woods to work. THEN they break out the spoons, etc.
And those without centre stands get a massive added bonus. They get to lie their bikes on its side, preferably on mud... But grass will do as second best, which obviously means a photo opportunity. Who doesn't enjoy the sheer novelty of an Africa twin on its side? Wheel off and another photo. With so much kudos to be gained its a wonder more people don't actively seek out punctures!! Or offer them as a service.
lol ... too much.
 

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If the puncture is clean and near the center of the tire and the tire is nearly new, I put a plug (the ones you install from the inside of the tire, it will outlast the tire, and worse case scenario, you'd start losing a bit of air at some point. Some tires even with a nail or screw in them barely lose any air. Cords you insert from the outside (the emergency kits they sell) will get you out of a bind (on tubeless tires) but are not recommended as a permanent fix (though they might very well last longer than the tire). With tubes, you can just patch the tire and the tube, or put in a new tube depending on the puncture. Still considering converting to tubeless...just makes it so much easier to get back on the road...more so when its 35C and you're stuck in a mosquito infested area with no central kickstand.
 

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I know I'm going of the thread, our motorcycle club recently held a tyre repair workshop to educate on tyre matters. I was absolutely staggers to see how thin some brand/model casings are in the centre of the tread area compared with others. Whether plugging a tubeless or puncture resistance of a tubed tyre, I see this as significant when choosing new tyres. An example showed a Bridgestone that was very thick with lots of steel against a Michelin that had no steel and was very thin, This is nothing negative about Michelin as I always loved the brand, more about the tyre model. I understand that tyre repairers know all about this and are the people we should be listening to when deciding on our next tyres.
Sounds interesting. What is your next tyre after your course?
 

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And those without centre stands get a massive added bonus. They get to lie their bikes on its side, preferably on mud...
If you do have a centerstand, make sure the bike doesn't fall off whatever you propped it up with under the bash plate when the front wheel is off. And if that happens, make sure you have enough room to one side or the other to push the bike over to get the wheel back on.
 

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This is the primary reason I went with the motoz tractionator GPS. At 4 ply, the carcasses are extremely thick. Even on the old tire I pulled off, you can stand on the bead with the tire vertical and it will support my weight. I do carry a full repair kit, compressor, and spare tube, but it is confidence inspiring to be rolling on that much rubber. I understand that tire isn't for everyone, but for my purposes, I haven't found better.
 

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I've always run my tires until threads show. All of them are shockingly thin at that point but I'm frugal. Not cheap, I always buy the best. In the shops I've worked in and the shops friends have owned most all the techs will use internal patches to spare the owner an expensive tire purchase. I have never heard the excuse of insurance. Insurance companies do not police the dealers. Insurance adjusters that I've dealt with are so ignorant (they really do not care about details of anything) they cannot even spot a bike that has flipped over backwards from wheelies. (Look for the grind angle of the exhaust tip) Again, they don't care. Shops that will not repair a puncture only want to sell a new tire. There is no other reason. If the insurance companies were watching then the automobile tire dealers would never touch a bike tire. But one did loan a friend some tools and worms to repair a front tire puncture. In less than 50 miles it was impossible to locate the repair. That trip went on for a several hundred miles before we were back home. No problem. If you know how to repair the puncture, no problem, and that could be one reason a tech will not do a repair. One cannot discount incompetence. But no repairs are likely just a reach for your wallet.
 

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thanks DoubleThumper. My apologies for not offering an official intro but I approach a good forum like a campfire discussion, join the conversation with a comment and give the bio later.

Spring is near (for some of us) and a local dealer will let me borrow his 2019 ATAS when the weather suits me. Things are looking up.(y)
 

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Sounds interesting. What is your next tyre after your course?
My tyre dealer tells me he gets a higher % of Michelin to Bridgestone motorcycle punctures. Leaving the tyre specification aside (apples with apples). My AT came with Bridgestone as OE, I'll probably stay with them. Having said this, I'm a life long Michelin fan and use them on all my cars and vans!
 

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You would really need to know what percentage of Michelin tires your dealer sells compared to Bridgestone tires for the dealer's statement to mean much. If he sells twice as many Michelin tires than he does Bridgestone, then it would stand to reason that he sees a higher % of Michelin to Bridgestone punctures. It is a bit like saying that Labrador Retrievers account for a higher percentage of dog bites than Blood Hounds. Okay, Labrador Retrievers are a much more popular breed than Blood Hound, so it stands to reason :)
 
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