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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm about to test ride an Africa Twin.
One concern I have is punctures in tubed tyres. It's a long time since I've had spoked wheels and from memory they deflate very quickly if punctured.
I've had punctures in tubeless tyres and made a temporary repair with a plug kit and ridden home ok.
What do owners of Africa Twins do? It must be difficult to remove the rear wheel, in particular, unless a centre stand is fitted.
 

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Aside from a good breakdown recovery plan i.e. AA RAC Hondacare and let them get their hands dirty.
As a temporary fix (get you home) could you not use some of that slime sealant in the tube, then put a new tube in when you got home?
 

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Yep. If you have a small puncture in a tubed tyre then something like slime will get you home. I had an old DR 250 running around for months on slime until I got around to replacing the tube. If a puncture is too big for the slime treatment then you are in for a PITA job if you want to do it roadside. Here's where a centre stand is going to make life 1000% easier (in Australia they come fitted to the bike as standard). Of course that means carrying tools and a repair kit (or spare tube) as well. But then again, I've had a big hole ripped in a tubeless tyre on my Street Triple by a piece of scrap metal on the motorway which blew the tyre out instantly and was obviously irrepairable. I had to limp the bike to the nearest dealer some miles away and wait over 3 hours for a new tyre to be fitted. If I was on a bike with tubed tyres and carrying a spare tube I would have on my way in half an hour or so. Swings and roundabouts mate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you put the slime sealant in as a roadside repair or does it go in when the bike is brand new?
 

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You could convert to tubeless via new rims or tape.
When you have a flat the are will only be able to escape via the puncture and not true al the spokes.
This way the tire will deflate less rapidly, being more safe.

People may say it's 'dangerous' to convert to tubeless because of the lack of safety bead in the front rim, but actually tubes or not the lack of bead stays the same.
I actually suppose that with a tubeless conversion the tire will go flat less quickly (as described above) giving you more time to come to a safe halt.

I've converted my original rims using the 'Outex' kit from Japan and it works brilliantly.
Been running for about 1500 km and had 0 pressure loss.
If I have the inevitable flat I'll be up and running in 15 minutes using a plug kit.
 
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