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I am a new Africa Twin owner. This past weekend I was going up a muddy hill, didn't make it up and slowly laid the bike over into the mud. I just picked it up and took it to the car wash to wash off mud from the handlebar and footpeg.

It has be wondering, how often to offroaders tip over there bike? What's the circumstance?
What features does the Africa Twin have to protect it during a tip over?
What should I buy to protect my bike while offroading?

I know this is a lot but I'm still new to the game. Thanks!
 

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how often to offroaders tip over there bike?
Depends how much FUN you're having on your bike
What's the circumstance?
Depends what you were thinking at the time of fall
What features does the Africa Twin have to protect it during a tip over?
The only feature is the angle sensor which cuts off the engine
What should I buy to protect my bike while offroading?
Good engine guards or pay for training to fall without damage.

I'm skilled at falling without hurt- don't care about the bike as long as I can ride on it:
2019 TAT.jpg
 
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Off-road drops aren't uncommon, especially on the larger and heavier ADV bikes. Smaller and more flick-able off-roaders are much more forgiving than the AT, so don't beat yourself up.
Typically the damage caused by slow or static drops is cosmetic only but you can protect your bike with some additions.

Crash bars cover your engine and fairings... and really are a must for keeping your bike in good condition.
Steel or aluminium back guards (Barkbusters and Givi make some) reinforce your handlebars and can minimize twisting breakages.
A strong rear rack gives bonus crush protection to your exhaust, which is easy to overlook.
Crash bags strapped to your bars (carrying a waterproof jacket and first aid kit for example) offer additional soft impact defence. The black Givi bags have saved my fairings and bar coating on numerous occasions.

The irony in all of this is that adding armour to your bike makes it heavier, thus increasing the likelihood of slow speed drops... but you learn as you go.

I've low-sided mine in wet fields, caused by losing my confidence in camber turns and consequently easing off the throttle. If I take things too carefully... that's normally grounds for the slow motion wobble to the ground.
Remember to experiment with your bike's traction control. There's no shame in making mistakes but it is smart to armour up first if you haven't already.
 

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Buy tires with knobs for mud. TKC 80. Mitas E-10. Anlas Capra-x.
then you don’t loose traction and momentum. You still might drop it though in ruts.
barkbusters, SW motech bash plate, crash bars and rear rack have served me well.
Camel ADV sells footpeg and screen brace.
 

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how often to offroaders tip over there bike?
Depends how much FUN you're having on your bike
What's the circumstance?
Depends what you were thinking at the time of fall
What features does the Africa Twin have to protect it during a tip over?
The only feature is the angle sensor which cuts off the engine
What should I buy to protect my bike while offroading?
Good engine guards or pay for training to fall without damage.
...
That is some nap! ... .... with pride!

53436
 

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I am a new Africa Twin owner. This past weekend I was going up a muddy hill, didn't make it up and slowly laid the bike over into the mud. I just picked it up and took it to the car wash to wash off mud from the handlebar and footpeg.

It has be wondering, how often to offroaders tip over there bike? What's the circumstance?
What features does the Africa Twin have to protect it during a tip over?
What should I buy to protect my bike while offroading?

I know this is a lot but I'm still new to the game. Thanks!
Welcome to the Forum CBS.

I use an AltRider lower engine guard solution. (still need to install it)
 

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The best way to avoid tip overs, stay on dry flat asphalt or concrete surface away from any traffic , never exceed 20mph & you’ll probably or maybe be okay
 

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my responses to your Q's:

how often to offroaders tip over there bike?
It is fairly common if you are riding on anything more technical than a gravel road. my last trip I fell over 2X in 2 days - both at < 1 MPH on rocks. A muddy hill can be exceedingly tricky depending on steepness, depth of mud.
What's the circumstance?
usually very low speed, the AT needs to be moving to be stable. Your mind tells u to brake but what you often need is a bit of throttle w partial clutch (manual AT).
What should I buy to protect my bike while offroading?
You need some engine guards, 50/50 tires and to take lessons/read books/watch videos to learn proper techniques off road. It is a very different world than the street. But a tipover is not the end of the world, your bike will get some scratches but hey, who cares? off road patina...
 

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No worries mate, you are on an adventure bike now, not some shiny street machine!
I do as many off road trips I can each year. Reality is that as far as KMs count, most of them are still on tarmac.
But off road, I would guess I have on average 1 drop per day (at least) but much depends on terrain.
On dirt roads that a street car can handle (albeit slowly) the AT is a breeze to ride and easy to keep upright.
But when the going gets a little rougher, then drops are common. muddy or difficult rocky terrain and you can be dropping the bike every few 10s of meters. Its great fun and each drop teaches you something about the limitations of yourself, and the bike.

TIP1: don't try to save a drop. You can so easily tweak your back or shoulder trying to save the bike. Just try to jump away and let it go. Worst case is the bike pinning you down to the ground with no ridding buddy to help out, hence the correct instinct is to jump out of the way of the falling bike and laugh about your stupidity afterwards.

TIP2: Learn how to pick your bike up alone without hurting yourself, and be patient in getting your bike back up again. Better do it properly without injuries rather than quickly and pulling a muscle or worse. (remember the tilt sensor on the bike needs to be reset by switching the ignition at the key off and on again to reset, and if your bike was tipped over for a little longer than a few min, or if the tip was at a strange angle, it is not odd to have some smoke come from your exhaust for a short time. I am guessing some oil gets into places it shouldn't be.)

Crashbars. If you are like me, and want to go off road all the time, and like to challenge yourself, then crash bars are a must. They take the stress and fear out of dropping your bike.

Barkbusters (or equivalent). The standard hand guards that came with my AT (2017) were garbage and snapped off in the first drop. They failed at their main roll of protecting the levers and I lost my front brakes for the rest of my ride :oops:
Since getting barkbusters, I now have no fears of this and know my hands will not get crushed in a higher speed accident either.

Training courses.
These are well worth the money when you consider you are wrecking the centers bikes. I learnt so much on my first course that it totally changed the way I ride. My confidence was much higher and I was less afraid of riding with more speed which is the key to stability. I strongly believe that most of the newbie drops and tumbles are because of fear of speed. It is shocking the increase in control you have off road by being comfortable to ride at say 25-30kmh where before you would be **** scared of getting over 15kmh.
Your stability seems to erode exponentially with speed reduction off road.
Go and get these basic skills down while dropping, skidding, and crashing someone else's bike.
(I am not sponsored at all but the Honda Adventure center in Wales UK is a nice course to take.


I hope this helps.
 

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If you're new, don't ride alone. Get some off-road training.

Bike Protection

  • Skid plate
  • Lower & upper engine bars
  • Radiator guards
  • DoubleTake mirrors
  • Barkbuster Handguards
  • Low Windscreen
  • CamelADV Footpeg Brace
  • Bigger footpegs
  • Karoo3 tyres minimum, ideally Mitas E-12 & E-13 tyres if in mud
  • High fender kit (if in mud)

Personal Protection

  • Motocross Boots (Not road or adventure Boots)
  • Water Backback 2 litres minimum
  • Neck Brace & Body Armour (Rib Protection). I like Leatt Stuff.

I dropped my HAT about 15 times in 2019... no bike damage. But I broke 2 ribs in a 20 mph lowside. Hence personal protection advice.
 

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Had my first tip-over today on my ATAS riding on a sandy road. Was trying to turn around and dumped it. Did it on a downhill incline and had to get help to lift the bike up. Couldn’t get my butt on the seat to lift properly. That sucker feels as heavy as my Goldwing! Ride safe....pikester5
 

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Some good tips here. One that I know follow is to not ride alone offroad. I dropped my previous ADV bike on a steep loose hill and could not lift the bike. The angle was bad and it was hanging up on big rocks preventing me from fulling pulling the bike around while it was on the ground. I tried several times to lift the bike and just could not. I was planning my hike out of the area which would have been at least 8 miles through up and down terrain when a couple riders happened along and helped me

i also bought one of those portable motorcycle jacks just in case. But I don't ride the gnarly stuff solo anymore....
 

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I also say do not ride off road alone. Anything single track or knarly increases the chance you are going to drop your bike. Cripes, yesterday I almost dropped mine on pavement because I wasn't paying attention when coming to a stop. This bike is heavy when not in balance.

For me I am planning on doing an off road course after getting 50/50 tires. That is the single best investment in yourself you can make.

Ride safe.
 

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Started with tip-overs and had many crashes with my AT.
In the end, reaching the destination was all worth it.


 

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