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The final instalment of Honda's video series offers a much wanted glimpse at the bike in action, along with a fascinating discussion between HRC riders and Honda engineers.



The white Africa Twin is the traditional manual, the red bike is equipped with DCT, subtle differences distinguish the two. The red bike has a second parking brake calliper mounted low down on the rear wheel, the engine cases are also different.

Speaking of DCT, the riders spend a significant amount of time discussing the world first off road specific dual clutch transmission. Judging by the action shots the Africa Twin is going to be happily at home running for miles over open savannah and the DCT may make that even more enjoyable as it would allow for easier shifting while standing on the pegs.

 

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Hearing the development team talk about how they've come to like DCT with the refinements made, having liked manual and originally thinking they'd prefer it (much like the rest of us here) sure is motivation to at least ride it for myself than to opt out if it's optional.
 

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A very persuasive presentation. Sometimes I had trouble understanding, but I didn't hear anything about lean angle ABS, traction control, multiple power settings, cruise control or other costly electronic features, so maybe pricing will be in my range. (It will need ABS to be sold in Europe in 2016,so that 's certain to be included.) I am encouraged.
 

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I'd Try The DCT... It's Honda, so I Trust It

I've been riding for a while, like the rest of you guys, and I am getting a little older, so I'll be honest with you, there are times when I have thought that a mega-scooter's CVT-type transmission would have been nice. Honestly, there are times that I just get sick of clutching and shifting. I'm no purist and I can admit that.

I always thought that I would have a manual transmission car. Man, since I went Auto, especially sitting in South Florida rush hour traffic, I am so glad I did.

If it's built by Honda, I would bet that their system will be bullet proof and I'm willing to gamble that it would kick butt off-road. I'm not buying this bike to replace my Enduro R. I'm going to buy this bike to ride the way it was designed to be ridden.

I loved the video and I think it looks awesome, but I love black wheels, so I'll opt for the red/white model and paint the red and white parts gray or OD green, add a bunch of crash bars, and LED lights to ride that thing in the woods at night. Love the 0300 hrs night rides with mega lights. Slow and bright. You'd be amazed at the wildlife you see then.

Ride safely and don't plan your routes....
Jim
 

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I've been riding for a while, like the rest of you guys, and I am getting a little older, so I'll be honest with you, there are times when I have thought that a mega-scooter's CVT-type transmission would have been nice. Honestly, there are times that I just get sick of clutching and shifting. I'm no purist and I can admit that.

I always thought that I would have a manual transmission car. Man, since I went Auto, especially sitting in South Florida rush hour traffic, I am so glad I did.

If it's built by Honda, I would bet that their system will be bullet proof and I'm willing to gamble that it would kick butt off-road. I'm not buying this bike to replace my Enduro R. I'm going to buy this bike to ride the way it was designed to be ridden.

I loved the video and I think it looks awesome, but I love black wheels, so I'll opt for the red/white model and paint the red and white parts gray or OD green, add a bunch of crash bars, and LED lights to ride that thing in the woods at night. Love the 0300 hrs night rides with mega lights. Slow and bright. You'd be amazed at the wildlife you see then.

Ride safely and don't plan your routes....
Jim
That and even aggressive ergo's. Back in my younger days when i was starting out with sportbikes the ergo's were cool for the time but now I just want something much more relaxed compared to those aggressive ergonomics.
 

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Hello, everyone!

I'm considering the AT to replace a somewhat antiquated Cagiva GC. After exhausting every effort to research this model, I'm thinking that I'll have to take a "wait and see" approach. I'm counting on the Honda being a fine all around bike, but the weight seems to be no less than my Cagiva, which carries more fuel, by the way. I'm also opting for the minimalist options route, which should save about 22 pounds of of the wet weight. Time will surely tell the tale. Cheers!
 

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Hello, everyone!

I'm considering the AT to replace a somewhat antiquated Cagiva GC. After exhausting every effort to research this model, I'm thinking that I'll have to take a "wait and see" approach. I'm counting on the Honda being a fine all around bike, but the weight seems to be no less than my Cagiva, which carries more fuel, by the way. I'm also opting for the minimalist options route, which should save about 22 pounds of of the wet weight. Time will surely tell the tale. Cheers!
hey mike welcome to the boards, I think there are more then a few here mulling the same things...
 

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how does the DCT perform going into corners? those of you with experience....? how hard of a downshift, does it downshift?
 

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Dct

Hello all,
New to the forum.
I also would like to hear from anyone with DCT experience.
I spend most of my time on hard surface roads, but either way, it would be nice to hear from anyone with experience riding the DCT.
I am leaning that way on my purchase of the AT, especially considering shifts are supposedly seamless and quicker than manual transmission shifts.
However, I wonder about quality of ride at lower speeds, when the DCT could potentially drive me batty if it wasn't programmed well for all those low speed nuances I currently don't even think about with the manual transmission.
 

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Hello all,
New to the forum.
I also would like to hear from anyone with DCT experience.
(snip)
I am leaning that way on my purchase of the AT, especially considering shifts are supposedly seamless and quicker than manual transmission shifts.
However, I wonder about quality of ride at lower speeds, when the DCT could potentially drive me batty if it wasn't programmed well for all those low speed nuances I currently don't even think about with the manual transmission.
I ride a NC700XD and my only reasons for considering a CRF-AT is because I can get it with DCT and (a big and) it has the horsepower missing with the NC700. Highway passing on the NC700 is often a white knuckle experience.

To your questions: Speaking only of DCT as programmed for the NC700 (not dirt capable), it does shift quickly and seamlessly (perfect for avoiding helmet banging with a pillion). At slow speeds (traffic) it's marvelous. Easily as effortless as operating a car with an auto transmission in traffic. And, as with a car, your use of the throttle (easy or aggressive) influences when and how the DCT shifts.

But that's not the end of it. If you aren't satisfied with the response in one mode (say "Drive" which is the quick up shift economy mode), you can always select the "Sport" mode that holds each gear a little longer accelerating and downshifts a little quicker when slowing. Or you can over-ride the DCT program at any time and use the paddle shifters to up, or down shift at will. Finally, you can select the Manual mode and control all shifts with the paddle shifters (except it will drop down to first if you stop).

To directly answer MurphCO's question about downshifts and corners: The NC700 DCT has no idea you are approaching a corner and will only downshift as you come off the throttle according to parameters for the mode you are in. Sometimes, that's not enough and you will have to "manually" down shift to get where you want it to be. Riding on a gnarly dirt road one time, I came into a corner too fast, found myself reaching for a (non-existent) foot shift lever instead of the paddle shifter to drop down a gear or two. That highlighted two issues: first, years of muscle memory kick in during an "emergency" and second, finding a paddle shifter when the bike is dancing around over rough terrain is difficult. The solution turned out to be a Honda accessory foot shift kit which I acquired, installed and even use from time to time. (Hardly needed on paved roads - but I like having it anyway.)

I've put a few videos on YouTube about riding and modifying the NC700XD - search there for "NC700XD JustPlainBill0" to watch.
 

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I ride a NC700XD and my only reasons for considering a CRF-AT is because I can get it with DCT and (a big and) it has the horsepower missing with the NC700. Highway passing on the NC700 is often a white knuckle experience.

To your questions: Speaking only of DCT as programmed for the NC700 (not dirt capable), it does shift quickly and seamlessly (perfect for avoiding helmet banging with a pillion). At slow speeds (traffic) it's marvelous. Easily as effortless as operating a car with an auto transmission in traffic. And, as with a car, your use of the throttle (easy or aggressive) influences when and how the DCT shifts.

But that's not the end of it. If you aren't satisfied with the response in one mode (say "Drive" which is the quick up shift economy mode), you can always select the "Sport" mode that holds each gear a little longer accelerating and downshifts a little quicker when slowing. Or you can over-ride the DCT program at any time and use the paddle shifters to up, or down shift at will. Finally, you can select the Manual mode and control all shifts with the paddle shifters (except it will drop down to first if you stop).

To directly answer MurphCO's question about downshifts and corners: The NC700 DCT has no idea you are approaching a corner and will only downshift as you come off the throttle according to parameters for the mode you are in. Sometimes, that's not enough and you will have to "manually" down shift to get where you want it to be. Riding on a gnarly dirt road one time, I came into a corner too fast, found myself reaching for a (non-existent) foot shift lever instead of the paddle shifter to drop down a gear or two. That highlighted two issues: first, years of muscle memory kick in during an "emergency" and second, finding a paddle shifter when the bike is dancing around over rough terrain is difficult. The solution turned out to be a Honda accessory foot shift kit which I acquired, installed and even use from time to time. (Hardly needed on paved roads - but I like having it anyway.)

I've put a few videos on YouTube about riding and modifying the NC700XD - search there for "NC700XD JustPlainBill0" to watch.
Yea I'm really into that foot shift idea on the DCT. I don't see why Honda wouldn't offer it up on AT...regardless, that may be a large factor in my gear box choice... DCT with a foot shift does sound exremely appealing...almost like a seamless ;)

Do you have to select a manual mode, or if i shift with the lever or paddle it will do what I say and forget about its mode for the time being?
 

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Nessuno;9602 (snip) Do you have to select a manual mode said:
Shifting with lever or paddles always overrides the computer's gear choice. However, if you aren't in manual mode, when the computer judges (by throttle position/activity?) you have completed your intervention, it will take over and shift into the gear appropriate to mode, RPM and speed. Most often the computer is right, but not always so you need to keep that in mind.

The NC700 is marketed for new riders so having "nanny" programming might be intentional and a good thing. DCT programming for the CRF-AT is supposed to be more adaptive and take into consideration bike attitude (head uphill/downhill) and probably other off highway factors, so I would expect it to intervene somewhat less when the rider takes over.
 
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