Honda Africa Twin Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

21 - 40 of 52 Posts

Administrator
Joined
2,838 Posts
which I would paint over the top of the white hammerite if I was fussy (and if I was mad enough to buy an At with a white frame 馃槃)
Mike
I get it, but the poster was talking about the smooth white Hammerite being a good match. So I referenced the Shasta White NH-138. In the case of the black frame, I believe the code is Graphite Black NH-B01. You would still have to be motivated enough to paint over the black Hammerite though :)
 

Registered
Joined
1,484 Posts
I get it, but the poster was talking about the smooth white Hammerite being a good match. So I referenced the Shasta White NH-138. In the case of the black frame, I believe the code is Graphite Black NH-B01. You would still have to be motivated enough to paint over the black Hammerite though :)
Yeah - I think it's a task that the owner is going to have to keep re-doing so Hammerite is useful in that the prep needed is not as difficult as for proper autopaint. I don't really know whether you can apply the correct Shasta paint over the top without one or both of them crinkling.
Mike
 

Administrator
Joined
2,838 Posts
Yeah - I think it's a task that the owner is going to have to keep re-doing so Hammerite is useful in that the prep needed is not as difficult as for proper autopaint. I don't really know whether you can apply the correct Shasta paint over the top without one or both of them crinkling.
Mike
Probably not. Colorite has their "complete kits" as well likely trying to paint it over the top of anything isn't going to work well. But it would likely be the most durable and enduring method if you wanted to spend the time?

Honda NH138 Shasta White (colorrite.com)
 

Super Moderator
Joined
5,598 Posts
Yeah, I'd be inclined to clean and redress the affect areas with the best known method that suits the owner. If that means a high quality rust paint, so be it. I have done that on [mostly] '80s m/c frames. Never gave it further thought.
 

Registered
Joined
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
which I would paint over the top of the white hammerite if I was fussy (and if I was mad enough to buy an At with a white frame 馃槃)
Mike
Wanted an ATAS at the time, white frames only 馃槈. Not too fussy, next time the bash plate is off for oil change, canned etch primer plus gloss white good enough for me 馃憤
 

Registered
Joined
1,484 Posts
Yeah - I think owners will probably just have to bite the bullet. Most people can probably make an effective repair quite quickly and without stripping the bike. OK it won't look perfect, and it will probably need re-doing every year. but there's no way Honda or the dealership could do a botch-up job, and because it's cosmetic they aren't going to sanction several thousand dollars of remedial work to do it properly, and they probably know too that stripping the bike to that extent in a dealer's shop is likely to result in a host of different problems down the line.
If the bike is very new you MAY be able to get it replaced if you stamp your feet hard enough, failing that and if it still concerns owners then I guess they trade in to the dealer that sold them the bike (he would have some nerve if he knocked off value because of the frame rust).
Mike
 

Registered
Joined
85 Posts
I don't know about in other country's but I know from personal experience that Honda UK dont give a toss about how shoddy some of these bikes are. I opened a case with Honda UK after the dealer that sold me the bike brushed off my complaints made a couple of days after I bought my bike brand new from them. After extensive phone calls and emails and even having another dealer pick up and inspect my bike, Honda UK came back and said my bike was "within spec" and basicly told me to get lost. I will NEVER buy another new honda after my experience. The shitty welds are one thing, but the fact that they couldnt even be arsed to paint the entire frame is what really annoys me. This is why you see so many rusty africa twin frames.

61974
61975
61986
61977
61978
61979
61980
61981
61984
61985
 

Registered
Joined
56 Posts
Am shocked by some of these posts, particularly the last set of photo's.
The 'assumption' I made regarding Honda's high quality has taken a bit of a knock......enough so, that I've planned on going to visit my local Yamaha dealer to have a bo-peep at the 2021 Super-ten as an alternative.
 

Registered
Joined
85 Posts
I also assumed that Honda's were high quality bikes, I have owned many over the years including my other current bike which is a 20 year old 929 Fireblade. All of my previous Honda's were built to a very high standard so I didn't even look that closely at the ATAS before I bought it. Who expects to have to crawl round the floor with a torch/flashlight when looking at a brand new Honda. Well now I know and I won't make the same mistake again. I think my next bike will be a T700, and I will be taking a very close look when I go to buy one.
 

Registered
Joined
196 Posts
I like to think that the junk parts fitted to my Africa Twin were because Honda threw the kitchen sink at the engine/transmission unit. I still say that motorcycles should have a corrosion resistance rating by being secured and left on a UK beach from Nov-April. If any of the bike was found remaining in April, we would have good idea of quality. I am disappointed with Honda quality, or rather the lack of it.
 

Registered
Joined
85 Posts
When I bought my ATAS, I dreamed it would be my perfect bike, one I intended to keep forever, a bike I could use for anything and everything. At least this is how I justified spending out the largest sum of money I have ever spent on a motorcycle. One of my favourite previous bikes was an 87 XL600RMG. Sure it was a bit crude and vibey at higher speeds (the main reason I sold it) but I will always remember it as being extremely well built and very reliable. So when I first saw the ATAS I was smitten, this seemed like the perfect modern upgraded version of my beloved XL, capable of riding on the road all day, as well as being an off road beast. I had big plans for many modifications/upgrades to make the ATAS into my perfect dream bike.

So I put my hand in my pocket and took the plunge. Maybe I should have done more research before making such a large purchase, but I though to myself "this a Honda, they are the best bikes for quality, finish, reliability, customer service". That was how I justified the fact I was spending so much money buying a fairly expensive brand new bike. Imagine my disappointment when 2 days after getting the bike I started to notice all the problems pictured in my above post. I was worried but hopeful that the dealer would resolve my issues, after all this is the mighty Honda we are talking about (naive I know).

Well it turns out that neither the Honda dealer that sold me the bike, or even Honda themselves give a flying f***. Not only that but the bike is also very likely to suffer with ongoing reliability issues due to things like the piss poor way the fuel tank was manufactured, as well as many other common problems.

So now I have an expensive, potentially unreliable "adventure" bike that if It gets wet or it see's any hint of salt it will begin to dissolve before my very eyes (if it doesn't break down first). This has led me to the conclusion that this is not the "forever" bike I was hoping for and it will likely be sold or traded in this summer at a great financial loss.

I was a complete Honda fan boy before this bike, right from the moment I got my very first motorcycle as a child (a Honda MT50). This experience has totally changed my feelings towards the brand I once loved. :(
 

Super Moderator
Joined
5,598 Posts
When I bought my ..., I dreamed it would be my perfect bike, one I intended to keep forever, a bike I could use for anything and everything ...
I think every rider says this.

... and over and over.

I really like my [ugly] Africa Twin so much that it is beautiful. But how Honda / the dealership responded (or not) to your concerns does not help with their public relations. That is a bit of a rash for sure for you.

I guess one redeeming value that comes from Forum members who receive shoddy Honda workmanship is other members can leverage the experience and take extra note and perform a deeper inspection of the bike prior to purchase and again upon closing the transaction.
 

Registered
Joined
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I still love my ATAS, at this stage as I'm approaching 50yrs of age it remains my forever all-rounder, and I don't expect much to come of presenting to dealer when I visit next week (to have instrument cluster screen replaced under wty but that aside 馃槒), but by starting this thread I was interested to see if there was any trending patterns amongst the AT fraternity, before I get the response 'never seen that before' from dealer 馃え.
Anyway, I'm having more trouble with the recent purchase of a brand new camper trailer, where the supplier has seen more of it than we have, it's become a 2 steps forward 3 back....taking incompetence to new levels 馃槴..... the fix: DIY.
 

Registered
Joined
1,484 Posts
Yes Honda have made some mistakes with quality control on the frames and the ATAS tanks, but in many ways they have done a LOT better than other manufacturers. My pals have kawasakis and Yamahas and they have to work very very hard on their disk and disk mounting bolts and abs rings to keep them from going red rusty. Both my Africa Twins have been outstanding in this area with just an occasional rinse and not the slightest sign of corrosion - even through several uk winters. And the anodising on the forks has been perfect whereas many BMWs I have seen have had wriggles of corrosion under some kind of clearcoat. The chains on my Africa twins have been lasting over 20k miles whereas on other bikes it's been under 12k. Plastic fairings have just clicked together (once you know the trick), and the quality of all the plastics and decals seems great. The bright red rear coil spring seems well protected by some clever design and it looks in perfect condition after 22k miles which is more than can be said for my other recent bikes. Even the Nissin (?) callipers seem better able to resist going white. And the blue seat that I thought would soon look tatty is still like new, as is the rear rack which I was suspicious of once I found it wasn't metal. And once they sorted the spokes out most of the wheel problems were solved (there is still a star corrosion problem caused by the rear brake disk debris, but I'm just going to live with it).
So on mine I have one bit of the frame that I am going to have to keep on top of, and poorly finished and painted lower engine casings - which I am also occasionally handpainting. If I had an ATAS, I would have followed the instructions on this forum about fixing the tank myself.
I think Honda are at least as good as any other current manufacturer and better than most, and this bike is a keeper for me (not least because I don't like several aspects of the 1100cc bikes)
Mike
 

Registered
Joined
1,484 Posts
I would take easily replaced/treated brake discs and bolts over a botched frame/faulty fuel tank any day of the week.
I take your point Neil, but now I have had the tank off twice to fit electrical harnesses, I would be very happy to do the procedure developed by this forum to completely fix the ATAS tank problem - and I'm certainly not convinced that the recall procedure will achieve the same. Discs are not cheap, and you are supposed to replace all the bolts every time you take them off, but the main thing is that they are on show all the time so the fact that the Honda forks, callipers and disks stay pristine is a major plus I think. The frame problems are largely hidden although I must admit they are very apparent on white frames, and I would be wary of any frames that displayed weld problems (like cracking).
Mike
 

Registered
Joined
1,484 Posts
By the way - I thought people might be interested in a couple of other very cheap ways I have found of protecting the bike from the salt and making it look better. Here's the first. These are plastic bolt caps bought off Ebay for about 拢5. I had to buy a whole box of varying sizes to get enough for most of the engine bolts. I was worried they would melt but they haven't, and I put a dab of grease on each bolt head before fitting them.
Mike
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
UK 2018 ATAS with rusty frame also, mainly on the welds. Shoddy quality but no way Honda are going to admit this is anything more than cosmetic, the cost of a recall to fix this to a suitable standard would negate any profits they have made on the model entirely I would suspect (full bike strip and treat frame, respray to original colour and rebuild).
 
21 - 40 of 52 Posts
Top