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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Today I fitted a Scottoiler, getting the tank off turned out to be a grind.
Lets hope I've cut the right pipe for the vacuum,:surprise: find out later when I fire it up and prime the system.
Had them on a good few bikes previously, I hate lubing chains with spray cans.
Had to make a small bracket at the delivery end.
Success.
No ride to try on the fly but 20mins with the bike on the centre stand running and in gear soon had the good stuff flowing.


Pete.
 

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Prior to getting the AT I had an ST1300 & a DR650 (sold the ST1300, traded the DR650 for the AT). On the ST1300 I didn't need an oiler because it had a shaft drive (ultimate no maintenance). On the DR650 I used a Scottoiler.

For my AT I decided to go with a Tutoro automatic oiler instead, so far I prefer it to the Scottoiler. The Tutoro doesn't need any connection to the electrics or vacuum, instead it just used the natural motion of the bike to activate the oil release, when the bike is stationary there is no oil released. I prefer the simpler setup. I have a knob to regulate how much oil goes through and so far I really like the results, I have the chain looking wet but not dripping and the oil reservoir is going down slowly enough to go for well over 1,000km between top-ups.

Whatever automatic oiler is used is still going to be a LOT better than having to manually lube the chain though. Spraying the chain from a can is always a messy process and with the right flow rate an automatic oiler is less messy and a heck of a lot less hassle.
 

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I have driven shaft drive bikes for 10 years and now have the ATAS. I really like chain maint !
Chain spray is so easy, takes two minutes. Cleaning the chain is almost as easy, just spray it and wipe off. Adjusting is also a pleasure as it gives you something to do to the bike. I was brought up with re building british bikes in the 1960s and just having any tool in the hand does it for me (not that tool !)
 

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I love the way everyone has there on preference...nice to be individual.
To add mine into the equation im loving the Nemo 2 system, made beautifully and works like a Cham with no cutting into Hondas pipework.
IMO beats sitting on the floor with a lube can...but I am old, lol
 

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I had a scottoiler fitted to my ATAS by Honda as part of a deal, but cant seem to get the flow just right and Im sure some of the stuff ends up on the rear brake caliper ,It makes a real mess of your rear wheel also. I closed It right down yesterday and im sure more oil came out than on midway. I will persevere though as have one on my RD07 and have never had to adjust the rear chain in 3 years.
 

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I had a scottoiler fitted to my ATAS by Honda as part of a deal, but cant seem to get the flow just right and Im sure some of the stuff ends up on the rear brake caliper ,It makes a real mess of your rear wheel also. I closed It right down yesterday and im sure more oil came out than on midway. I will persevere though as have one on my RD07 and have never had to adjust the rear chain in 3 years.

I have similar troubles getting it to meter. I have the Scottoiler specifically sold for the AT and it doesn't seem to run on anything below midway and then uses too much for my liking. It gets all over the back wheel chainside, I haven't seen any in the caliper though. But it can empty the reservoir in 200 miles of riding.

I keep intending to find a set of instructions as mine weren't given to me by the dealer. I see a decal saying open it up to prime the system and I wonder if I may be doing something wrong.

I have an "original" 1990 Scottoiler on my CBR1000FL And the original chain lasted 26,000 miles.

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have similar troubles getting it to meter. I have the Scottoiler specifically sold for the AT and it doesn't seem to run on anything below midway and then uses too much for my liking. It gets all over the back wheel chainside, I haven't seen any in the caliper though. But it can empty the reservoir in 200 miles of riding.

I keep intending to find a set of instructions as mine weren't given to me by the dealer. I see a decal saying open it up to prime the system and I wonder if I may be doing something wrong.

I have an "original" 1990 Scottoiler on my CBR1000FL And the original chain lasted 26,000 miles.

Stuart

If you have oil coming to the rear, turn the knob clockwise till it's nearly off and start timing how long between each drop formed with the engine running, put a smaller spacer between the sprocket and the dispenser so you can see the drop form and leave the black tube, generally one drop per minute is sufficient.
Mark with Tippex if you have any comedians that can access the reservoir, the odd donkey finds it amusing to wind it up to prime, had it happen a time or two.


Pete.
Bit of titting about but worth the effort once you have it sorted.
 

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I had a scottoiler fitted to my ATAS by Honda as part of a deal, but cant seem to get the flow just right and Im sure some of the stuff ends up on the rear brake caliper ,It makes a real mess of your rear wheel also. I closed It right down yesterday and im sure more oil came out than on midway. I will persevere though as have one on my RD07 and have never had to adjust the rear chain in 3 years.
That's part of the reason I didn't go with a Scottoiler on my AT like I had used on my DR650, it was too hard to get the right flow. I'd end up with the entire reservoir empty within 300km of riding, so I'd turn it down and there would be no change in the oil level over 1,000km of riding - too much oil or no oil flow at all.

My Tutoro automatic oiler seems to be about right without any of the hassle I had with the Scottoiler. I tried 1 turn out on the adjustment knob, the oil went down really slowly (beats having the oil not go down at all) and the chain was not quite wet enough, so I turned the knob another 1/4 turn - it seems about right now on 1 1/4 turns out from fully tightened. The reliable flow combined with not having to tap into a vacuum line makes it a winner in my book.
 

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If you have oil coming to the rear, turn the knob clockwise till it's nearly off and start timing how long between each drop formed with the engine running, put a smaller spacer between the sprocket and the dispenser so you can see the drop form and leave the black tube, generally one drop per minute is sufficient.
Mark with Tippex if you have any comedians that can access the reservoir, the odd donkey finds it amusing to wind it up to prime, had it happen a time or two.


Pete.
Bit of titting about but worth the effort once you have it sorted.
Am I being stupid? as the arrow marked prime is clockwise,with the tube and knob slightly upwards against the frame, this increases the flow and anticlockwise to reduce flow..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Am I being stupid? as the arrow marked prime is clockwise,with the tube and knob slightly upwards against the frame, this increases the flow and anticlockwise to reduce flow..

Not stupid, clockwise to prime, anti to reduce. My mistake I'm sorry to say.
Took mine for a test spin this evening after work and a couple of small adjustments has it working a treat.
!00+ miles, nicely lubed chain and no **** on the wheels.
No more spray can.
 

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Whereabouts did you fit reservoir etc?
On the left side, not far from the passenger footpeg. It is a little hard to fill with the pannier on, but the pannier (Bumot) is easy to take off and I should go well over 1,000km between fills.
 

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On the left side, not far from the passenger footpeg. It is a little hard to fill with the pannier on, but the pannier (Bumot) is easy to take off and I should go well over 1,000km between fills.
Could you post a pic? Thanks!
 

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Which kit did you install? There are 3 options.
The local supplier only lists one option:
Tutoro Auto Chain Oiler (FBG Delux Kit)

I've recently been on a three & a half week trip, travelling over 5,000 km. The Tutoro did a great job, without me needing to take a spray can of chain lube. In my Bumot tool box I put the small oil bottle that came with the oiler, that was easily enough to keep the oiler topped up. I've found that in hot weather the best flow rate is with the knob 1 turn out, for medium weather 1 1/4 turns out and for cold weather 1 1/2 turns out. Unlike the Scott Oiler I had with the DR650, the Tutoro seems to be very consistent and reliable on the oil flow rate.

If my bike was stolen and the insurance company gave me the money it is insured for then I'd buy another Africa Twin DCT and I'd install another Tutoro oiler on it. It would not be a hard decision.
 

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Hi guys, having just bought a AT, I'm looking at how best to look after my chain, very over sticky spray lubes, an was thinking of the Scottoiler, however I like the look of the Tutoro as I don't have to remove the fuel tank and cut into the vacuum plumbing.
KiwiMark, you posted a couple pics of your unit, sadly they don't show any longer,any chance you could repost them please...
Anyone else with installed pics would be welcome...
Cheers W
 

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Here is an older post:


... and since then I relocated the reservoir up and back a few inches ...

55798


I really like it and this is the third bike I have used them on. I get about 1500 kms per fill (varies with temperature, but is easily adjustable), and I have successfully used it with full synthetic 5W40 motor oil. The chain stays nicely juiced, or whatever way you prefer, and chain debris will not stay adhered. I don't think about it.
 
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