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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm probably pulling the trigger on one of these two next week. I'm only going to be able to test ride the dct, (test rides are difficult here as the bikes are mostly presold). Color wise, I prefer the black, but I'm open to the silver if the dct is a real benefit. I guess basically I'm asking what folks think of the dct.

Thanks!

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DCT or not is a very individual opinion, so as I am sure you already know, you have to make your mind up on that one yourself.

Having said that, I LOVE my DCT. It has enough flexibility in the different programs to let you dial in just what you want - and if it ever doesn't give you what you want, manual gear changes are super fast and easy with your left thumb or index finger.

One thing to note - if you ride it in D mode and you are taking it easy on the throttle (either running it in, or just being tentative on a test ride), it will feel like a bit of a slug - it will change all the way to 6th gear by around 35 mph. Don't let that put you off DCT - when ridden with a little more oomph, or when using any of the the S modes (S1 = least sporty, S3 = most sporty), it feels a lot more "normal" and will change gears more like you likely would yourself.

There really isn't a wrong choice - DCT or not, you will end up with an awesome bike.
 

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Standard for me. Been riding 47 years - my left hand knows what to do with a clutch; my mind and body know what revs feel good either uphill or down hill, freeway or single track.
And the 23lb weight saving is worth it.

If I came from scooter land I'd probably be wanting a DCT.
 

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Definitely very personal decision. I've been riding 35 years and I opted for the DCT. Not because I'm lazy, but because for where and what I ride see an advantage. I ride 50/50. Living at the base of the Rockies you can't help but ride off-road on all kinds of surfaces and conditions.

The inability of the DCT to stall is HUGE when you are on a steep rocky or loose surface and have to make adjustments. Not having to fiddle with a clutch when your focus is all over the place is a help. I've dropped my standard transmissions on steep stuff before, and what I pain getting it upright and getting going again.

The "paddle" shifters are a non-issue for me as well. I also mountain bike and I have Shimano Rapid-fire shifters. So that was no big deal...

If I do have one complaint with DCT off-road, its a split second behind what I need the bike to do. If I start a climb, it is a split second slow to down-shift. If I'm going down a hill and need it to down-shift for engine braking its a bit slow. BUT the beauty is you can over-ride that with a push or pull on the shifters.

For normal cruising on highways, non-dirt situations, I don't see a real advantage to DCT. I think it does have one minor nit. If you go to pass or need that sudden burst of speed, a twist of the throttle takes the system to realize you want to drop it a gear and go. I can do it faster with a manual as its second nature to me to grab the clutch and downshift. I'm learning to just push the shifter button down... So its probably just me and a learning curve for something that has been muscle memory for years.

I have seen from an experienced "Trials" rider who rides a DCT, that standard or methodologies that work for a standard transmission bike needs to be modified for the DCT. Totally doable though...

It took me about a week to not reach for a non-existent clutch, toe an non-existent shifter. But I don't even notice anymore. I have not regrets with my decision.

The problem is when I switch to my Ducati and forget to put it in gear when the light turns green!
 

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Deciding which transmission is best for you is way more important than color. My queen is standard gearbox because I have over fifty years experience off-road and I am an old dog that does not like to learn new tricks. A clutch is second nature to me. I am always looking ahead in the dirt, making gearing decisions before I arrive. I do not think the DCT can do that. I also like to be able to disengage the engine from the drive train at any time which I do not think DCT will let me do that, either. Bump starting is not a big issue but I do not think DCT will do that. How could I preform second gear, full throttle, dump the clutch burnouts with DCT?
For A rider who has limited off-road experience or one with the patience to learn new skills, I am sure the DCT is a cool thing.
 

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The DCT is also fantastic for town riding, it is so much more relaxing when you have to stop start all the time. I sold my AT but if I got another one it would be a DCT again, but I might get a foot shifter with it for those downshifts when coming into corners. I think it feels more natural than the paddles.
 

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DCT was interesting and not that hard to adjust to, but in the end it added more off road weight, and is just something else to go wrong. Depends on what you plan to do no the bike, you will love it either way. Pull the trigger and get out on the road. Ride Safe.
 

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I bought the DCT. I figured if I didn't like the DCT, I could always sale or trade it in on a manual transmission. The DCT is a keeper and it is Silver in color. As stated in a previous post, running it in S1, S2 or S3 is more like how I run a manual transmission. If you can test ride the DCT, do so and see for yourself.
Charles
 

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I choose the manual after test riding both on road: I tried all 3 "modes", and found them to be seamlessly adequate, but after 40 years of riding manual transmissions find it disconcerting to be reaching for shift pegs and clutch levers that are not there. Quite happy with my choice. Got 4000 miles on it already, having bought it in early march.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Really appreciate all the replies! Very much looking forward to my test ride this week.

To the guy who said transmission choice is much more important than color.. well not to someone who makes a living in the visual arts ;)

It's actually taken a lot of thought and rationalization on my part to even choose to go with an adventure bike, (I was originally looking at scramblers).As a class of bike, I find ADVs generally low on visual appeal. One of the things that first drew me to riding was how cool the machines looked. Don't get me wrong, this isn't about impressing anyone, it's about the right bike for someone who holds visual aesthetics in high regard.

My current bike is a 1979 cb750f that I have turned into a minimalist brat style bike, a bit of a passion project and not comfortable at all lol. I've been riding for a few years now and I think longer trips are what I want to start doing, that and camping off our beautiful mountain back roads in BC Canada. So i think my practical side won over in my decision to go ADV, however I still want the bike to visually inspire me. The Tiger 800 XCX actually wins in this dept IMHO but the Africa actually works out cheaper and is probably the far superior bike, so I just feel it would be silly to go with the xcx. Whichever Africa I choose, it will not be staying stock for long :)

Here's the current ride I mentioned above.


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There are plenty of folks around that would agree with you on visuals. I have never felt that way. I too work in the visual arts, and when it comes to machines like cameras or motorbikes it is function over form every single time. A good looking bike that does not inspire while riding is a waste of money for me, as is adding bits to it that do not improve the riding experience. However looking at the amount of people who spend hundreds on new exhausts, and pretty metal bits I guess I am in a minority.

I made the mistake of buying a Thruxton R recently. I broke my own rule and went for it because it looked kind of nice in that cafe racer way. The ride was good but not outstanding and I sold it after a few months. My mistake I forgot that looks are a nice bonus not the reason to buy a bike.

To me all adv bikes are pretty ugly, it doesn't matter which you choice. The AT is the bike to get if you would really benefit from DCT, or you want to take a big bike off-road, those are it's USPs. For me other considerations with the possible exception of affordability are minor in comparison.

Good luck with your choice.
 

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I went with manual. I just don't think I fit into the niche market of DCT. Plus I saw the **** my father went through with his DCT 4x4 atv and I won't get into that here because I know everyone who buys one loves it. My clutch has saved my life numerous times over the years and I will never give that up, the muscle memory I've worked so hard on would be all for nothing if I bought a DCT. How would that mess with my timing and reactions when I jump back on my other bikes that are all still manual?

Have you seen the black one in person? They just look soooooooo sweet, plus they're the only black adventure bike (aren't they?). There are tons of silver adventure bikes of course with the GSs out cruising around. But whenever I see a silver AT with big dirt tires on it I'm drooling just as much lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The tiger 800 xcx comes in black.

The idea of silver is growing on me. Especially with the paniers.

I didn't mean to suggest that looks were MORE important than performance, just that they are important.

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I think the silver is the nicest color they offer and is only available on 2016's,and once you add some knobby tires to the mix they look bad ass, if you get the silver you get the dtc with it to me that is a win win .
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the silver is the nicest color they offer and is only available on 2016's,and once you add some knobby tires to the mix they look bad ass, if you get the silver you get the dtc with it to me that is a win win .
I'm beginning to think the same thing

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I absolutely love my DCT. The smoothness of the shifts is unbelievable. And to those who think they'll forget how to ride a manual or lose their clutch muscle memory: nonsense. Do you have to give it any thought at all when you go from a manual shift car to one with an automatic transmission? I still ride my jockey shift '74 shovelhead; it's not like I have to relearn how the foot clutch works when I do.
 

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And to those who think they'll forget how to ride a manual or lose their clutch muscle memory: nonsense. Do you have to give it any thought at all when you go from a manual shift car to one with an automatic transmission?
Yes, if I haven't driven my manual car in a couple of months it takes me a solid day or two to get it dialed perfect again. Heel-toe downshifting is always a little jerky at first but nice and smooth after a day or two. If I'm switching back and fourth between my autos and manual I make little mistakes that I don't make if I stop driving the autos. And I consider this skill far more crucial on a motorcycle because a miscalculation could kill me. This is why there are people out there with a small bike like a cb500 that can outride guys on superbikes in the twisties. They have become perfectly tuned to that machine through years of repetition and muscle memory. It's important to me but I realize it's not to others. Just thought I'd share my thoughts that's all, far from nonsense in my mind.
 
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