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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone!

I need some advice on how to deal with a situation I’ve never encountered. For just over a year now, I have an 18 ATAS with just over 10K miles (I bought it new).

In that time I’ve had six ... SIX ... front flat tires, I recently put Michelin Anakee Adventure and in less than 500 miles... a flat. Name the tube, I’ve probably tried it, three types of tires (can’t remember the one before) plus the stock tire.

Two dealerships have inspected the wheel several times, as well as an independent mechanic I paid and no one can find anything wrong. They have (and I have) inspected the tubes and there is no common place for where the hole/pinch happens. I check the pressure often and rarely need to fill it before a ride.

I will take it back to the dealership (again) where I bought it from this weekend to get fixed (again), but I simply can’t trust the wheel. Prior to this most recent flat, I averaged 1800 to 2000 miles and I’d get a flat.

Any thoughts? I may spring for tubeless wheels but this is ridiculous in my opinion.

Thanks in advance for any insight.

Bookem
 

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If the tube is pinched it means that either the tube was not installed correctly or you are running too low of tire pressure and causing the tube to be pinched. What type of leak is in the tube? Is it a perforation hole or a pinch?
 

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Hey Everyone!

I need some advice on how to deal with a situation I’ve never encountered. For just over a year now, I have an 18 ATAS with just over 10K miles (I bought it new).

In that time I’ve had six ... SIX ... front flat tires, I recently put Michelin Anakee Adventure and in less than 500 miles... a flat. Name the tube, I’ve probably tried it, three types of tires (can’t remember the one before) plus the stock tire.

Two dealerships have inspected the wheel several times, as well as an independent mechanic I paid and no one can find anything wrong. They have (and I have) inspected the tubes and there is no common place for where the hole/pinch happens. I check the pressure often and rarely need to fill it before a ride.

I will take it back to the dealership (again) where I bought it from this weekend to get fixed (again), but I simply can’t trust the wheel. Prior to this most recent flat, I averaged 1800 to 2000 miles and I’d get a flat.

Any thoughts? I may spring for tubeless wheels but this is ridiculous in my opinion.

Thanks in advance for any insight.

Bookem
So we would need to know whats happening to the tube, are they new tubes each tire? where is the air leak inside the tube against the wheel rim or out against the tire? are they an actual pinch flat where the tube is damaged against the edge of the rim and whatever you have hit with the tire. As bdalameda said above need more details but if its 3 different tires on 3 different tubes and they all look like a pinch its tire pressure. If its an actual spike hole through both tire and tube its something you are riding over. First question is it 3 tires and 3 tubes?
 

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Possibly something in tyre which is under the surface. Can you tell where puncture is in relation to tyre and also is it on tyre side or wheel side of tube?
 

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A: Screw tubes!

B: I used the Outex kit to get rid of the tubes, replaced the factory tyres early (only 1,100km on them), wore out a rear E07 and a Front TKC-80, my current E07+ rear is now quite worn and I'll be replacing that soon but the 2nd TKC-80 front is still good, the bike is over 20,000km. Number of punctures (front + rear) so far is zero.

C: Screw tubes!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Bdalameda, SkipD, WTF and KiwiMark,

First, thank you all for your input. To answer a few questions - Three different tires, six different tubes with each tube new and out of the box. To WTFs question, after removing the tubes and carefully lining up the tube(s) against the tire(s), there is no consistency in terms of where the tubes are being damaged. I’m pretty sure there isn’t something in the wheel itself as it’s never in the same place.

If bdalameda is right, and it is a pinched tube caused by low pressure I can somewhat understand that. The damage does look more like a pinch, and I’ve never found an indication of the tire being punctured. What bothers about that theory is:

1) After the second flat I became a bit paranoid and check the pressure at least one per week. In all seriousness, and honesty, how many of us check that often? Before this past flat, I checked just two days prior and there was no issue.

2) I’ve never had this happen, this often. I had a KLR for nine seasons, had two flats but both were the rear tire and both had obvious causes (one a sharp rock on dirt I couldn’t avoid, the other road debris). Seriously, are you guys checking your pressure every single time you get on your bike?

KiwiMark, going tubeless may very well be on the horizon.

Thanks for the input, everyone!
Bookem
 

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I check my tire pressure when the ambient air temperature changes significantly between days of the week.

Otherwise, I check my tires on a random basis, typically tied to the distance of the moon from the earth, its rotation relative to Uranus, and the how high the tides are in the Bay of Fundy every fifth Wednesday on dates divisible by four at 03:33.
 

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My wife is the rockstar of checking tire pressures. She checks them on both of our bikes before every ride.

If it was just me I would be in trouble. I never remember to check that stuff.

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
DoubleThumper ... 3:33 ... AM or PM? I may have found my answer depending on which one! 😆

Bookem
 

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Try a different tire pressure gauge.
I have two identical ones that read 5psi different. I never thought twice about it until I installed my cheapie TPMS on my bike and my tire pressures showed 5psi low. I used another gauge that matched the TPMS, verified by a couple other gauges as well.
This may explain your pinch flats.
 

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Try a different tire pressure gauge.
I have two identical ones that read 5psi different. I never thought twice about it until I installed my cheapie TPMS on my bike and my tire pressures showed 5psi low. I used another gauge that matched the TPMS, verified by a couple other gauges as well.
This may explain your pinch flats.
I like the gauges that only go up to 50-60 psi. I figure they give a more accurate reading of those lower pressures than the ones that read up to 120 psi or higher.

I like the Jaco Elite Series, but there are many good ones



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Just to cover all aspects; do you change your tires/tubes alone or at a shop?

If the latter, did you use the same shop for all those changes?

Was talc powder used during tube insertion?
 

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Just to cover all aspects; do you change your tires/tubes alone or at a shop?

If the latter, did you use the same shop for all those changes?

Was talc powder used during tube insertion?
Just a thought. Talcum powder may not be the most appropriate material for tire changing. We used rubber gloves with leather over gloves to protect the rubber gloves to reduce the risk of electrical shock. Talcum powder was used in our rubber gloves to make it easier to put the rubber gloves on. As soft as talcum powder seems to be, it caused premature abrasive wear on the rubber gloves in the long term. We switched to corn starch. There are some other compounds available as well.
 

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Have you tried a thicker tube? The only flat I've had was on the OEM tube (a nail) and it would have happened with any tube. I use Ultra HD tubes and haven't had another puncture in 40,000 kilometres. Any loose spokes that might have the nipple poking through?
 

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Just a thought. Talcum powder may not be the most appropriate material for tire changing. We used rubber gloves with leather over gloves to protect the rubber gloves to reduce the risk of electrical shock. Talcum powder was used in our rubber gloves to make it easier to put the rubber gloves on. As soft as talcum powder seems to be, it caused premature abrasive wear on the rubber gloves in the long term. We switched to corn starch. There are some other compounds available as well.
The powder is sprinkled lightly inside the tire and rubbed around before installing the tube. This allows the tube a better chance to settle in a natural position when inflating. Not sure how corn starch would fare. Is this what you are recommending Bill?

One question for Bookem: is the tube damage consistently on the pavement side, the sidewall area or the rim area? If so, that will give you some useful information. If not, and the failures do look like pinch failures, consider running higher pressure by 3-5 psig front and 4-7 psig, rear conditions permitting. The extra pressure won't hurt the tire but it can change the wear characteristics. It might keep you in the pink, so to speak.

Also, test your tire pressure with 3 different pressure gauges to see if you're getting accurate readings.

Superfunk's idea is also a good one. I also use thick tubes and fill both with Ride-On tire sealant to take care of minor punctures.

 

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The powder is sprinkled lightly inside the tire and rubbed around before installing the tube. This allows the tube a better chance to settle in a natural position when inflating. Not sure how corn starch would fare. Is this what you are recommending Bill?
It is something I would try if I kept experiencing tube failures with no other causes. I never realized that talcum powder could be abrasive on rubber. It feels so soft and slippery that would be the last thing I would expect. In our work failure of the gloves could result in electrocution. With motorcycles failure of the rubber tube will result in a slow leak or worst case explosive leak. We applied the corn starch to the gloves in the same manner you mentioned for talcum powder in tires.

I have also been told most tube tires have a smooth internal surface while many tubeless tires will have small ridges on the interior surface. The tube needs to be able to move slightly within the tire. The ridges can cause more friction and wear on a light duty tube. The advice given to me was to use heavy duty tubes if they are being installed in a tubeless tire.
 
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