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or if you are a big guy check threads about there not being enough preload at the back to compensate, making the front light twitchy and wobbly.
I am 180lb and have ridden mine very fast through the Pennine hills with two Tracers and the AT handled better than they did and it's on the stock tyres.
Mike
 

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Yep, check your SAG first, I have OEM tyres and they are fine for me, no steering damper required.
 
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Adjust your preload.

I read recently that a 185 lb guy was doing anywhere between 7 clicks to 2 28 clicks of pre-load to get the right sag measurement.
 

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Adjust your preload.

I read recently that a 185 lb guy was doing anywhere between 7 clicks to 2 28 clicks of pre-load to get the right sag measurement.
That might have been me. The bike comes from the factory with 7 clicks at the back but this gave me at 185lb (ish with riding gear on) too much sag at the rear. I think I turned it to 22 clicks to get the same rider sag as the front even though this wasn't quite right for the 1/3 2/3 rule. I may have then notched it up another 6 clicks to allow for the panniers and a small amount of contents. That left 7 clicks of rear preload available which obviously would not be enough for a pillion and two person's luggage.
Mike
 

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And if you run out of rear preload back off the preload at the front to lower that, better sitting at 40% SAG even than 30% front and 40% back (as an example).
 
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or if you are a big guy check threads about there not being enough preload at the back to compensate, making the front light twitchy and wobbly.
I am 180lb and have ridden mine very fast through the Pennine hills with two Tracers and the AT handled better than they did and it's on the stock tyres.
Mike
I think you have this backwards. Added rear sag will give the forks more rake angle=more trail=more stability=heavier steering. To get the most stability from the stock suspension would be to decrease the rear preload and increase the front preload. Adjusting rake angle is always a compromise based on rider preference and riding conditions. Street handling in twisty roads can generally be improved (quicker and lighter) with less rake while high speed off road riding in rough terrain is easier to keep rubber side down with more rake. That is why steering dampers are popular for street and off road racers; they can have less rake for quicker steering in the tight stuff but damp head shake at high speed and rough stuff. I do not think the Queen really needs a steering damper if properly set-up for each individual circumstance (rider weight, load and riding conditions). With a minimum of dial and test, I have my old girl working pretty well on street and dirt.
Also, tires generally do not have a minimal effect on stability unless tire size is changed. Larger in the front will add rake/trail, adding stability; larger in the rear decreasing rake/trail, decreasing stability.
My2cents...
 

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I think you have this backwards. Added rear sag will give the forks more rake angle=more trail=more stability=heavier steering. To get the most stability from the stock suspension would be to decrease the rear preload and increase the front preload. Adjusting rake angle is always a compromise based on rider preference and riding conditions. Street handling in twisty roads can generally be improved (quicker and lighter) with less rake while high speed off road riding in rough terrain is easier to keep rubber side down with more rake. .
I think I can see where you are coming from on the rake/trail thing and intuitively that seems correct - let the bike sag more at the back than the front and it will be more stable - especially off-road. But I think the OP was talking about wobbles and squirelliness on road riding, and surely the aim for that would be a balanced bike with similar sag at front and back when the rider gets on.
Mike
 

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What? Let the rear sag more? NO, NO, NO! That is completely wrong...

I've been riding and roadracing for over 30 years. You want to ADD more preload to the rear of the bike (you actually want the preload to be set properly front and rear) to get rid of the "light" front end.

Don't believe those of us that are telling you to add more rear preload? Seriously, go talk to a motorcycle shop that specializes in Suspension and get their professional advice... If you've never experienced a true full on tank slapper thats thrown you down the road nearly killing you, be grateful. I have and did extensive research into motorcycle suspension to find out why things like that happen. Of course there are other factors that can contribute to a light front-end, but setting PROPER preload is the VERY FIRST step to get your motorcycle to handle properly.



I think I can see where you are coming from on the rake/trail thing and intuitively that seems correct - let the bike sag more at the back than the front and it will be more stable - especially off-road. But I think the OP was talking about wobbles and squirelliness on road riding, and surely the aim for that would be a balanced bike with similar sag at front and back when the rider gets on.
Mike
 

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I think I can see where you are coming from on the rake/trail thing and intuitively that seems correct - let the bike sag more at the back than the front and it will be more stable - especially off-road. But I think the OP was talking about wobbles and squirelliness on road riding, and surely the aim for that would be a balanced bike with similar sag at front and back when the rider gets on.
Mike
Well, it is more than intuitively correct, it it motorcycle geometry 101. Trail is what mainly controls front end stability and trail is controlled by steering head rake angle and fork offset. It has the same on road or off road. The difference is that unless one is riding through potholes, street riding causes far less front wheel deflection than off road. That is why bikes ridden exclusively on the tarmac will typically be setup with less trail thereby instilling lighter handling.
With a dual-purpose bike like the Queen, bike set-up is a very dynamic and personal thing...:wink2:
 

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What? Let the rear sag more? NO, NO, NO! That is completely wrong...

I've been riding and roadracing for over 30 years. You want to ADD more preload to the rear of the bike (you actually want the preload to be set properly front and rear) to get rid of the "light" front end.

Don't believe those of us that are telling you to add more rear preload? Seriously, go talk to a motorcycle shop that specializes in Suspension and get their professional advice... If you've never experienced a true full on tank slapper thats thrown you down the road nearly killing you, be grateful. I have and did extensive research into motorcycle suspension to find out why things like that happen. Of course there are other factors that can contribute to a light front-end, but setting PROPER preload is the VERY FIRST step to get your motorcycle to handle properly.
There is probably one thing users of this forum can all agree: be suspicious of anything written on it:x
 
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