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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2016 AT has just registered 16,000 miles and the valve clearance check and adjust are specified at this point. My experience with shim type engines is that that is a conservative mileage. My Honda VFR 800 would easily go 30,000 Miles between checks. I know the AT has screw and lock nut on the exhaust valves which typically require more frequent adjustments. I went back through all of the pertinent threads in the Engine - Technical section to find what owners have experienced at the first valve adjustment to see if they were loose or tight on in spec. Member Ziggy was the only one to say his were in spec. at the first check. There is a wealth of knowledge out there on this topic. Can you tell me your experience on this? I would like to go 20k -25k miles or??
 

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My CRF1000 has got 28K miles and I am planning to check the valves at 30K miles for the first time given the complexity/cost to get to them. From my experience with other Hondas I owned/own with locknut adjuster, it is fine to run them for 22-25K miles before adjusting - this is the interval I typically check/adjust the valves in my trusty Transalp 650 (current mileage 112K).

It is a shame Honda decided to use shims only for the inlet valves in the CRF, these can go for much longer before needing adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
XLGeorge, Thanks, 28K miles, not checked yet. Running good I would presume. Good feed back. Looking for more especially those that have had the check done.
 

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Do the first scheduled check at least. You have no idea where you are until you look. There's the run-in factor as well with the first time; even if they need to be adjusted now they may not need it for a long time after.
 

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Do the first scheduled check at least. You have no idea where you are until you look. There's the run-in factor as well with the first time; even if they need to be adjusted now they may not need it for a long time after.

Thats also how I see it, on most bikes when it's affordable, I always do it at recommended interval, but if its very labor intensive and expensive like on the AT, I'll just check the first time at recommended km, and depending on how off their were, I'll stretch for the 2nd adjustment. But without knowing you could have some valves that are getting very tight, and when they do, they do not make any noise to let you know as opposed to loose valves...
 

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Is it worth risking burnt out valves & the expense that goes with repairing them, it will make the service seem very cheap compared to pulling the heads & replacing valves or worst case, complete engine rebuild if it drops a valve, destroys the piston & head, warranty wont cover that damage unless they they been checked, if you want to check them yourself its not a big deal, just takes a bit of time to remove the tank & fairings to get to the rocker covers, its all in the workshop manual
 

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Might be a silly question but how much of the fairing has to be stripped off to get to the valves ? My owners manual appears to have a conveniently exposed engine for valve checking but no mention of how to get to that point.
 

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It is not only the fairing, the following things need to come off - next to them I mention the relevant section of the workshop manual:


-fuel tank 7-6
-windscreen 2-5
-middle cowl 2-6
-front spoiler 2-7
-front cover 2-7
-air cleaner housing 7-11
-throttle bodies 7-12
-spark plug cap 3-6
-ignition coil tray 5-9
-cylinder head cover 10-4


It is a **** of a lot of work to reach to the point to be able remove the cylinder head cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys. Appreciate your thoughts on why it should be done on time. It is getting too cold to ride here now and I will probably roll the AT into my shop and do the check myself. Like XLGeorge said there is a lot of parts to R/R to access the cam cover. Still would like to hear what owners found when they measured their clearance.
 

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here's a good write up from Ozzie Sean over at ADVR.
This is his second adjustment on the AT. Both times in spec.
https://advrider.com/f/threads/crf1000l-valve-check-guide.1349761/

I would never skip a service, esp the 1st. Once I know for a fact where my valves are at I may skip the second.
But winters here suck, so I have time.
My tenere was never a peach, but at least the intervals were quite big. BTW...I had to adjust shims on the tenere every time. 1st time was a 6 hr job. I got it down to 3 hrs after doing mine and a few other people's tenere's.
https://thetenerist.wordpress.com/2013/10/29/tenere-valve-check-and-adjustment/

To honda's defense, the manual and procedure is straight forward. The cam is marked where you can actually see the marks (what a thought!! Yamaha...you taking notes?)
If valves need to be adjusted they will likely be the exhaust valves which are cinch to do once in the motor.
The CCT looks a bit tricky, but not as bad as the 1st gen tenere...Total piece of ****. The 2nd gen was muj beuno!
 

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I would never skip a service, esp the 1st. Once I know for a fact where my valves are at I may skip the second.
But winters here suck, so I have time.
Greg, I was also of the same opinion, and even checked the valves of an old Transalp 650 at only 8000 miles, because this is what it was stated in the manual. I also stripped half the bike down to get to the valves of my VFR VTEC at 32000 miles, to find them (the non-VTEC ones) all in spec.

Then back in 2011 I bought another Transalp 650 to use it for commuting to work, and this was almost new with only 5000 miles on the clock. I managed to get it cheaply, so I thought "sod it, let it run until I hear that some valves have opened up". I did let it run for quite some years and only decided to strip it down to check the valves roughly a year ago at 30000 miles (I repeat:the Honda recommended interval is 8000 miles). Well, I found a couple of the exhaust valves having opened up a bit and one of the inlet valves having closed down a bit, but nothing dramatic.

Based on this finding, and also on the fact that I did not need to adjust the valves in my first check on other Honda bikes, I decided to skip the first check on my CRF1000 and double the interval. I had also searched around and read that almost nobody found valves out of spec at 16000 miles / 24000 kms. I am now approaching 32000 miles / 48000 kms and have to bite the bullet and check them, thanks for the link by motociclo/Sean who posts good stuff on advrider. I will report what I find when I get to do it, probably sometime after Xmas.
 

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Greg, I was also of the same opinion, and even checked the valves of an old Transalp 650 at only 8000 miles, because this is what it was stated in the manual. I also stripped half the bike down to get to the valves of my VFR VTEC at 32000 miles, to find them (the non-VTEC ones) all in spec.

Then back in 2011 I bought another Transalp 650 to use it for commuting to work, and this was almost new with only 5000 miles on the clock. I managed to get it cheaply, so I thought "sod it, let it run until I hear that some valves have opened up". I did let it run for quite some years and only decided to strip it down to check the valves roughly a year ago at 30000 miles (I repeat:the Honda recommended interval is 8000 miles). Well, I found a couple of the exhaust valves having opened up a bit and one of the inlet valves having closed down a bit, but nothing dramatic.

Based on this finding, and also on the fact that I did not need to adjust the valves in my first check on other Honda bikes, I decided to skip the first check on my CRF1000 and double the interval. I had also searched around and read that almost nobody found valves out of spec at 16000 miles / 24000 kms. I am now approaching 32000 miles / 48000 kms and have to bite the bullet and check them, thanks for the link by motociclo/Sean who posts good stuff on advrider. I will report what I find when I get to do it, probably sometime after Xmas.
I doubt you will find anything shocking. I get bored easily and cabin fever sets in. So off to the garage I go to skin knuckles and throw wrenches:laugh:
I usually clock 13-17k km per year, so might be right in the middle for the checks. I'll live on the edge and check them at 30k km!
That said, my buddy Richard is due for his 26k km check. He's a licensed mc mechanic, and an obsessive tinkerer...I will likely follow along, take pics of the procedure and do a write up.
 

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Picked up my 2016 ATDCT earlier this past spring and after riding a couple thousand miles decided I needed a base line for the maintenance as it had 16000 miles. I took it into the local dealer for the 16K service which included checking the valve lash, it was found to be within specks and required no adjustments... Thinking I'll stretch that next inspection out a bit more and do it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have 16,300 miles on the bike now and have completed the valve adjustment. All were in spec., but 1 exhaust valve was at the tight limit. I moved it back into the mid range. All other valves were in the mid setting. It took me about 8.5 hours taking my time labeling various hoses and connectors and taking lots of pictures of wire routing. If I had to do it again soon I am sure that i could cut off a few hours. After another year I will forget all the details and be doomed to a longer work session. I will stretch out the next check past the 32K point. Thanks for all of your feed back. :wink2:
 

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I have 18,300 miles on the bike now and have just completed the valve adjustment. All were in spec., but 1 exhaust valve was at the tight limit. I moved it back to the upper limit. Even though all the other exhaust valves were in the middle of the range I adjusted them all to the upper limit so I can stretch the mileage before the next check.. All the intake valves were spot on the middle of the range so I left them as is. . It took me about 8.5 hours
 

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I am now approaching 32000 miles / 48000 kms and have to bite the bullet and check them, thanks for the link by motociclo/Sean who posts good stuff on advrider. I will report what I find when I get to do it, probably sometime after Xmas.
We did the valve job with a mechanic who is also a friend. He dismantled and put together everything and I did check the valves and adjusted the clearances. The work was done at 28700 ml / 46000 km for the first time in the bike's life. All valves were found in spec apart from one exhaust valve that had opened up. In more detail, this is what I found.

For the inlet valves which use shims and for which Honda specifies 0.16+-0.3, I found them all at 0.17 so did not touch them. For the exhaust valves which use locknut adjuster and for which Honda specifies 0.23+-0.2, I found the following values left-to-right: 0.215, 0.25, 0.27, 0.22. So effectively only one was out of spec by 0.2 at 0.27, but as it had opened up this is not a big issue. Another one was close to the tight limit (value 0.215) but still within spec. I did adjust three of them to 0.25, i.e. at the top end of the open spec just in case the gaps close down.

Let me add that we also changed the spark plugs, the two inner ones have very difficult access so change should be combined with valve check. Next check for me will be at 60000 ml / 96000 km.
 
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