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2022 ES
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38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stripped 2 skid plate bolts with a Huskey 5mm hex that attaches to my torque wrench. Kind of easily. First time I thought maybe I wasn't in all the way, but that wasn't the problem.

First question, what is the appropriate tool for torqueing the hex bolts? Do I need special Japanese hex keys or something like that?

Second question, how/where do I buy replacement bolts? I gave a quick google but didn't get anywhere.
 

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2022 CRF1100 ATAS ES DCT
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The button heads on the AT are all (well nearly all) 5mm and that is the standard hex size for an M8 screw so anything smaller than M8 has to be shallower so that it doesn't weaken the shank of the screw, because of that it is very easy to round them.
Good quality hex keys are a must and I highly recommend the Wera Hex Plus keys, they grip on the sides rather than the corners and are excellent for the shallow hex's on some of the AT's button heads.

As for where to buy then if you are wanting identical then Honda is the only place as the majority are non standard. If you don't care about having different hex sizes then you will find flange button head socket screws on Amazon or eBay.
 

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2019 ATAS DCT
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912 Posts

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2019 ATAS DCT
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I should add that those bolts are made of butter. But they don’t need official torque numbers. Some parts just need German torque, goodntight with a 1/4 inch ratchet. You need to get a feel for things.
 

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'22 AT DCT
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If you are stripping bolts left and right, you are going at a pace faster than you can handle. I'd suggest slowing down or take a break and restore your patience.
 

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Unlike cross point screw heads and screwdrivers there isn't a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) hex key or Allen key as we call them here in the UK. So long as you have the correct metric size and the 'bit' isn't worn you're good to go.

I'd replace the Honda spec hex key button heads with conventional hex head flange bolts.

Assuming it was the button head you stripped out you need to learn how to handle your tools, hold the head of the tool fully and squarely on the head of the nut or bolt while applying the turning force at a right angle or whatever angle to suit any offset of the tool being used.

For my two penneth I wouldn't bother with torque wrench settings for the likes of bolts securing a skid plate, just nip them up and be done.
 

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2019 Africa Twin Adventure Sports
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593 Posts
BLUE Lock-tight and just over hand tight is usually good for these types of bolts. They are easy to get to and can be checked often but with an application of BLUE lock-tight you should be good.
 
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I find a speed (T) handle ideal for removing & replacing smaller bolts that are prone to stripping.

Whereas it's easy to over-torque and/or go crooked with a hex key or ratchet, a T-handle gives better feedback and applies torque more evenly around the circumference. It's fast too.
 

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What we'd call a 'ratchet tee bar handle'

I have a ¼" square drive one, very handy for the smaller (<M5) fasteners. It is best used with an extension bar so that the 120 mm tee bar fits nicely in the palm of the hand, gripped between the thumb and the crook of the little finger with the turning force applied by a twisting the wrist. A very useful driver for the smaller fastenings, still needs to held firmly and squarely on the head of the fastener to avoid damage.
 

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2019 Africa Twin Adventure Sports
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593 Posts
I personally use the Blue loctite(mine is 242) on every fastener on the bike. Old habit from owning older dirt bikes. I have not had an issue in 20 years. They are many different loctite strengths. Don't mix up the stronger ones.
 
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I personally use the Blue loctite (mine is 242) on every fastener on the bike...
Loctite 242 vs Loctite 243 - I've had this conversation before and haven't found a definitive answer by Loctite or Henkel it seems as if the two are either the same or very similar. I've heard others claim that 243 is an upgraded version of 242, the exact reasons of any such claims being unclear. If I was a gambling man I'd wager they're both the same and that 242 was aimed at North American market and 243 the Rest of the World only because the 242 TDS refers to imperial units of measure and °F vs the 243 TDS referring to metric units of measure and °C.
 

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2022 Adventure Sport ES Manual
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DON'T put Loctite anywhere near ABS plastic.

I wrecked an XRV 750 fairing and a Tiger Xcx front mudguard by using Loctite on bolts where I was wary about over tightening. It was only after the Tiger that it dawned on me that the Loctite makes ABS plastic brittle and disintegrate.
The bolts were metal and the fixings were too but if they hold a plastic part in place.....

The skid pan here isn't an issue of course but as the thread discusses Loctite.
Check out the link below and read 'Limitations'.

 
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