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Discussion Starter #1
My 2018 tricolour standard AT is better painted than my 2017 bike was......Except .... in a couple of places.
This is one of them, and I don't want the Honda dealer stripping the bike to replace the part, because to me it looks like a new frame would be needed. However it may be that the part is bolted on to the side of the downtube and is a relatively easy replacement. The similar looking part to the left of the downtube is however welded on - but is absolutely fine and has been properly painted.
I would be happy enough for the dealer to strip off the adjacent panelling and bits and pieces and clean it up and paint it in situ with Hammerite ...... but I know Honda won't sanction that under warranty (the bike is 18 months old).
So my question is what bits have to be removed so I could get a wire brush to this part, and then brush paint with hammerite?
By the way - all the gray stuff is Honda Moly grease that I painted on as soon as I got the bike because the 2017 bike had rusted in lots of places - you can even see that I painted grease over these areas that have rusted, so the last bike must have failed here too.
Mike
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Maybe just the horn. You could quite possibly get a small wire brush... Tooth brush size or even smaller. Then use a larger artist brush for the tight areas. I'll have to look at my bike, going off memory, but I might be tempted to try and spray it if I could get it masked. Still use an artist brush to touch up any areas the tape blocked.

That hammerite is good stuff. I had a buddy who always painted his rusty cars with that stuff. I was amazed at how well they'd hold up, and survive Chicago's salty roads.

Really a shame you have to deal with that. Are you close to the coast?
 

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It may sound stupid, but I tried chain lube, specifically motorex adventure, on rusty car. Even without cleaning rust, it helps to stop rust spreading a lot, holds rain and car wash for a month or so.

This is not permanent, but I would highly recommend this for hard to access places as a prevention.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It may sound stupid, but I tried chain lube, specifically motorex adventure, on rusty car. Even without cleaning rust, it helps to stop rust spreading a lot, holds rain and car wash for a month or so.

This is not permanent, but I would highly recommend this for hard to access places as a prevention.
Yes that would be easy to apply but as the Honda moly 60 grease didn't stop the rust (from underneath), I'm not sure that the chain lube would either.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe just the horn. You could quite possibly get a small wire brush... Tooth brush size or even smaller. Then use a larger artist brush for the tight areas. I'll have to look at my bike, going off memory, but I might be tempted to try and spray it if I could get it masked. Still use an artist brush to touch up any areas the tape blocked.

That hammerite is good stuff. I had a buddy who always painted his rusty cars with that stuff. I was amazed at how well they'd hold up, and survive Chicago's salty roads.

Really a shame you have to deal with that. Are you close to the coast?
You might be right that just removing the horn could let me get at it. If Honda don't say their dealer can do it, I think I will just try getting at it with the horn out of the way (the horn bracket could be done while it's off too.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes it's either hammerite straight on to rusty metal (wire brushed of course) .... or .....I'm tempted to treat it with Kurust - or whatever compound it is that converts the red oxide into a dark blue compound, then spray it with some waxoyl - that might have the advantage of getting through the hole you can see and maybe round the back a bit too. But does anyone know if the heat from the engine and radiator will simply melt the waxoyl off?
Mike
 

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I don't ride in salt or live by the coast so I'm not sure how this compares, but when I do wash the bike, it gets sprayed through a garden pump sprayer with

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It seems that the dirt and grime washes off easier the next time. I haven't conducted anything scientific, but I believe that the wax properties may have a protective effect. While I've read about rust on these bikes, there's none on mine.... spokes as well.

I understand your desire to protect the bike, but if it's rusting, it'll be rusting in areas you can't see and can't get to with paint without total disassembly.
 

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Yes it's either hammerite straight on to rusty metal (wire brushed of course) .... or .....I'm tempted to treat it with Kurust - or whatever compound it is that converts the red oxide into a dark blue compound, then spray it with some waxoyl - that might have the advantage of getting through the hole you can see and maybe round the back a bit too. But does anyone know if the heat from the engine and radiator will simply melt the waxoyl off?
Mike
Saw this post after responding. Since it's marketed for automotive, I'd think it would be fine temperature wise. The other converter I've used with great success is ospho. Wire brush, paint or spray ospho on, wait till it turns black, then paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't ride in salt or live by the coast so I'm not sure how this compares, but when I do wash the bike, it gets sprayed through a garden pump sprayer with

View attachment 58106


It seems that the dirt and grime washes off easier the next time. I haven't conducted anything scientific, but I believe that the wax properties may have a protective effect. While I've read about rust on these bikes, there's none on mine.... spokes as well.

I understand your desire to protect the bike, but if it's rusting, it'll be rusting in areas you can't see and can't get to with paint without total disassembly.
I will see if that stuff is for sale this side of the pond.
It seems that most of the current bike is finished OK. On the 2017 bike a lot more of the area to the left of the picture above was rusting. Also several seams in the rear subframe (below the seat and near the rear footrests). They seem to be fine on the current bike. However the lower engine casings on this one are more poorly painted than on the last bike. Again, I think I'd rather try to solve that problem myself rather than claim new engine casings, as I just don't think ANY dealer would be able to put the engine back together as well as the factory initially assembled it.
Mike
 

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I will see if that stuff is for sale this side of the pond.
It seems that most of the current bike is finished OK. On the 2017 bike a lot more of the area to the left of the picture above was rusting. Also several seams in the rear subframe (below the seat and near the rear footrests). They seem to be fine on the current bike. However the lower engine casings on this one are more poorly painted than on the last bike. Again, I think I'd rather try to solve that problem myself rather than claim new engine casings, as I just don't think ANY dealer would be able to put the engine back together as well as the factory initially assembled it.
Mike
I'd feel the same way. But I'd sure as heck be letting them know about it. Knowing myself, I'd probably be demanding a new bike. Rediculous you have to deal with this.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Crap. The area appears "well aged".

Did you say it was corroding from both sides?
What I mean by that is that it's a flange that has been welded on (probably) to the downtube of the frame. We can see one side of this has been painted (powder coated) very badly so I have to assume that the inner surface which we can't see is equally bad. That's backed up by the rust you can see inside and around the drilled hole.
I have sent these pictures to the dealer, but Honda usually insist on the dealer seeing the machine and taking their own pics. I suspect that is because Honda want to guard against fiddles (probably me taking a pic of a mate's problem older bike and pretending it's on my new one). However in this case they can actually see the VIN number in the photo, so here's hoping.
Mike
 

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I would clean the area and use a rust converter paint or treatment to prevent this from happening again. I also use a product called CorrosionX occasionally to prevent rust and corrosion. Do you live somewhere where the roads are salted in the winter? Even in summer the road salt can be thrown up into this area from being behind other vehicles or with wet roads etc.

Dan

See info:


 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would clean the area and use a rust converter paint or treatment to prevent this from happening again. I also use a product called CorrosionX occasionally to prevent rust and corrosion. Do you live somewhere where the roads are salted in the winter? Even in summer the road salt can be thrown up into this area from being behind other vehicles or with wet roads etc.

Dan

See info:


Yeah in this country Kurust does the same thing. It was bought by Hammerite some years ago and is now sold under their brand. It used to be done by creating a phosphorus salt from the ferric oxide, but I suspect the chemical used to do it is totally politically incorrect for the EU these days, so let's hope if it is safer to use it's just as effective.
In truth though I'm in two mins about whether to attack it first with kurust or just go straight to the hammerite paint after scraping off the loose rust. Hammerite says you can on the can.
Mike
 
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