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ATAS 2020 DCT ES
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Kinda new here on the forum and don’t really know in what thread to post this question.
I am a new rider and a bought an ATAS DCT, I am looking for some tips and tricks for slow speed handling a DCT. U-turns, pulling away in a tight bend,….

feel free to share any tips and tricks please :D

BIG THANKS,

Stijn
 

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CRF1100 DCT 2021
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253 Posts
Train yourself to be very well aware and respectful of the exquisite sensitivity of the throttle on first gear, especially at stops and very slow maneuvers, like parking, U-turns etc. On those situations be always vigilante of not making undesired twists of the throttle and be super smooth. Get used to have your foot on the rear brake and maybe your index on the front brake also. As soon as you are not going further put the beast in neutral. On stops take your right hand out of the throttle and your feet on the rear brake pedal. On slow city transit try using a low Power low Engine Braking setting (like 3 blue marks on each). That´s what I learned the hard way! Once you automate these precautions you should be fine and enjoy a big grin when you do intend to launch forward your missile :cool:
 

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CRF1100 DCT
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I recently got back on bikes after 25 years absence, I have arthritis in my left hand so DCT seemed to be the best choice. With it being so long since I had had a bike I took bad for a while and I thought at first I had made a mistake going DCT. I soon got into the swing of things and started loving it.
At first I set a user mode up with lowest power (4 blue), minimum Engine Braking (3 blue) and I used drive mode. I found the back brake was good for controlling things at starts and slow manoeuvres as the throttle is very sensitive and I took bad. Now I am used to the throttle and I have learned how to control it smoothly but the back brake still gets used to aid slow manoeuvres.
I now use max power and sport 2 mode most of the time but I still like engine braking on minimum.
 

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Concerning U-turns, throttle control is paramount, but a close cousin is proper counter weight. With a good head turn and confident counter weight I can do steering stop U-turns. Takes practice to get used to the friction automatically applied by the DCT at slow speed but it works and is completely doable. The rear brake skillfully applied is another good tool but not the only one in the bag.
 

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Concerning U-turns, throttle control is paramount, but a close cousin is proper counter weight. With a good head turn and confident counter weight I can do steering stop U-turns. Takes practice to get used to the friction automatically applied by the DCT at slow speed but it works and is completely doable. The rear brake skillfully applied is another good tool but not the only one in the bag.
I found that 55 years of habit/muscle memory was hard to overcome. My brain and body ‘assume’ the bike will stall if I don’t manage the clutch-throttle-brake and I’ll fall over. Once I started to overcome that ingrained reaction and realized the magic is it won’t stall it became much easier to simply let it ‘idle’ around the turn. I use the techniques everyone advises in appropriate situations that call for more brake-throttle, etc., but I’m learning it’s just not that hard to rely on a little more balance. It helps me to experiment/practice in a flat parking lot.
 

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ATAS 2020 DCT ES
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I
I recently got back on bikes after 25 years absence, I have arthritis in my left hand so DCT seemed to be the best choice. With it being so long since I had had a bike I took bad for a while and I thought at first I had made a mistake going DCT. I soon got into the swing of things and started loving it.
At first I set a user mode up with lowest power (4 blue), minimum Engine Braking (3 blue) and I used drive mode. I found the back brake was good for controlling things at starts and slow manoeuvres as the throttle is very sensitive and I took bad. Now I am used to the throttle and I have learned how to control it smoothly but the back brake still gets used to aid slow manoeuvres.
I now use max power and sport 2 mode most of the time but I still like engine braking on minimum.
I did some searching on the internet and found some people that advise using the gravel mode for slow speed handling and traffic in rural area, maybe I must try this on a empty parking lot, anybody here tried this? I will take the advice of keeping my foot on the rear brake and gentle throttle.
I think it’s also in my mind, my first bike and a little scared of tipping it over ;) When I took the driving lessons for my drivers licence on a Yamaha MT07 I had no problem with slow speed handling, but the weight of that bike was 50 kg less I think.

thx for all the input already, i will take it on next sunday on the parking lot.
 

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I


I did some searching on the internet and found some people that advise using the gravel mode for slow speed handling and traffic in rural area, maybe I must try this on a empty parking lot, anybody here tried this? I will take the advice of keeping my foot on the rear brake and gentle throttle.
I think it’s also in my mind, my first bike and a little scared of tipping it over ;) When I took the driving lessons for my drivers licence on a Yamaha MT07 I had no problem with slow speed handling, but the weight of that bike was 50 kg less I think.

thx for all the input already, i will take it on next sunday on the parking lot.
I usually put mine in urban mode around town to tame low speed throttle response.
 

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CRF1100 DCT
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I tried gravel mode but never noticed much difference, also tried G Mode and again not much difference. Both however were recently so maybe I had sort of gained confidence by then.
 

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Ah ya, da throttle thang.
And I just realized a day or two ago upon being committed to the dreaded right U turn, in addition to the throttle issue, right U turns require the ability to have the right foot available......meaning it therefore can't also be available for the rear brake. But at speed, right turns are nicer! - :ROFLMAO:
 
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