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Discussion Starter #1
So how do you let others know you're on the road and don't care to be run over? After over a half century on bikes, I've definitely got some ideas. Not all have gel'd yet though. Here are some of my thoughts:

Daytime is bad, but night is the worst. Lacking depth perception, oppo drivers will lose your lights in the background and make snap decisions (we've all been there...right?) which can lead to bad outcomes. In the past, I have run my other OEM bike lights in high beam in the dark to ensure I'm seen. With the Denali aux lights I can't run the AT that way. I do use the Pass Indicator button to flash folks that seem like they're thinking of getting in my path but that's rare. These Denalis have made a very big change in how I ride at night. Two thumbs way up, though aiming them isn't an exact science...yet.

For daytime, I recently found a road-worker's yellow vest with reflective tape on the side of the road. While my RevIt Sand riding gear is light colored and probably pretty visible day or night, I've started wearing that vest outside my jacket to up my visibility.

Day or night, I also believe a stout exhaust note lets the cagers know you're around. They will tend to look harder for you compared to a putt-putt machine, all else equal. Nothing obnoxious, just a stout note to let them know I'm around.

Anyway, what do you folks do to stay alive?
 

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I have the fluorescent yellow covers on mine plus those amber flood/fog that I run as DRL’s


A friend of mine who is a EMT said she likes when bikers wear the bright yellow vests it makes it easier on her to find the torso...
Yes we can do things to make us (hopefully) more visible, but the sad fact is people just don’t pay attention and pull out in front of cars, trucks, trains...
Like they say: “Ride like you are invisible”
 

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Sadly, ...



... I wear mostly black or dark colours. I know, I know, white helmets, yellow vests, etc. My jacket and boot piping reflect quite brightly (3M product), but I know that is short of enough.

I rely heavily and continuously under all light (and lack thereof) on anticipation. Been doing this all my life and has saved my life maybe three times.

Some call it defensive driving. I just call it anticipating the lazy cager to make an irresponsible move and have exit strategies ready. It just seems second nature. I am continuously and subconsciously scanning the road ahead all the time, yet smelling the roses on the way.

This is the essence of why I ride. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother.
 

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I stuck lines of reflective tape to each the rear of my panniers, which helps the tiny tail light whenever there's someone behind me.
I keep a strong headtorch (among other things) in my crash bags, wearing it backwards on my helmet if night fog gets a little crazy.
My front, rear drybags, helmet and jacket all have small reflective piping and graphics... though that's a happy accident and less of a style choice.
Honestly, I've not had any issues with my stock headlight so haven't bothered to add to it yet. I'll occasionally double tap it in corners to alert oncoming drivers.
The baffled Remus Okami exhaust gives a deep rumble that can be heard from a quarter mile away, though I couldn't say how speeding car drivers perceive it... if at all.
 

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What about the helmet? ... err, I mean the head?, ( -- ga --), I mean the head in the helmet?
Well I never leave home with out one, and yes they are a convenient way to store your head, when not in use.
Not really sure on how much a bright color would help, you could argue that every little bit helps, but if they don’t pay attention to all the other visible things, is a fluorescent helmet doing much in the way of getting you noticed...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I stuck lines of reflective tape to each the rear of my panniers, which helps the tiny tail light whenever there's someone behind me.
I keep a strong headtorch (among other things) in my crash bags, wearing it backwards on my helmet if night fog gets a little crazy.
My front, rear drybags, helmet and jacket all have small reflective piping and graphics... though that's a happy accident and less of a style choice.
Honestly, I've not had any issues with my stock headlight so haven't bothered to add to it yet. I'll occasionally double tap it in corners to alert oncoming drivers.
The baffled Remus Okami exhaust gives a deep rumble that can be heard from a quarter mile away, though I couldn't say how speeding car drivers perceive it... if at all.
I did something similar with my Yamaha FJR SkyGuy. I bought two large reflective panels for the rear of the bags. They light up like an emergency vehicle does when lit from the rear. I suspect they give me a bit of an edge at night.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I also put hi-vis brake/running lights on the back of the bike. I have Denalis on the AT, and Hyperlites on the FJR.


The Hypers flash when braking. The Denalis do not. Both are LEDs and are very bright.
 

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Viz at night is a whole nother ball game.. As most of you know I have a couple lights on my AT, but all the stickers I had made are all on a reflective base. So my swing arm, front fender, fork guards, plus a few of the stickers on all my boxes are reflective. LOL even the sticker on the skid plate for my center stand is reflective. You can’t have to much of anything to get a bike noticed at night..
 
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