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Discussion Starter #1
Never expected much for a factory tool kit but mine was rather funny. Purchased used so thought maybe none existed but what I found: The plastic bag with a screwdriver with reversible tip and a small plastic fuse puller. Yep that will get you going again if you suffer a break down. LOL Would have put together my own kit anyway but got a hoot out of this.
 

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I bought mine used as well and received a similar kit. The PO, while a nice guy, was sort of lost in his own garage.
My 2018 ATAS came nicely farkled. He mentioned the poor handling, I did some quick adjustments and it rides a lot better than when I brought it home. I will have either a heaver spring installed or add an Ohlins shock. No matter what I do it is a great bike.
 

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This has been addressed before, but in the US, you didn't get any tools except the screwdriver and a 5mm Allen key. And if you think about it, there's not much you could fix by the side of the road or the trail, so that's about all you need. Oh, maybe tire tools, but many people don't attempt even that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Have to disagree with that. I carry tools and it has got me going again more than a couple of times. Most recent I broke a pull throttle cable while out of state. Having tools allowed me to swap the almost useless push cable with the broken pull and it got me home. I also carry some misc bolts, nuts, SS wire, tape and tie wraps.
 

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Most of the bikes that I have owned have come with just a couple of small cheap wrenches.

I always put together my own tool bag with whatever I need to remove the wheels and repair a flat. If there is room I try and carry all the tools I use to do regular maintenance. In addition some generic, but useful things like pliers, tape, knife, wire and JB Weld. If I can’t fix the problem, someone else around might be able to if I have the right tools.

I also carry a first aid kit. I used to think, what’s the point, I’m not a paramedic. Then my friend’s wife had a minor crash in the mountains in North Carolina. She was OK, but her knee was skinned up pretty bad and wouldn’t stop bleeding.

We rode an hour and found a drug store to get her some bandages, antibiotic spray etc. While they tended to her knee, I put together a first aid kit and have always carried one since.

I figure, I may not be a mechanic or paramedic, but I can at least carry some essentials and someone else may have the knowhow if I don’t.
 

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Most of the bikes that I have owned have come with just a couple of small cheap wrenches.

I always put together my own tool bag with whatever I need to remove the wheels and repair a flat. If there is room I try and carry all the tools I use to do regular maintenance. In addition some generic, but useful things like pliers, tape, knife, wire and JB Weld. If I can’t fix the problem, someone else around might be able to if I have the right tools.

I also carry a first aid kit. I used to think, what’s the point, I’m not a paramedic. Then my friend’s wife had a minor crash in the mountains in North Carolina. She was OK, but her knee was skinned up pretty bad and wouldn’t stop bleeding.

We rode an hour and found a drug store to get her some bandages, antibiotic spray etc. While they tended to her knee, I put together a first aid kit and have always carried one since.

I figure, I may not be a mechanic or paramedic, but I can at least carry some essentials and someone else may have the knowhow if I don’t.
Well Sir, yep, it's always good to carry even the most basic of first aid kits. No, you don't have to go Paramedic school (although, while expensive and quite extensive, it's quite valuable) to be able to treat even some minor issues. It would behoove you to find a CPR class and even a remedial first aid training class in your area if you could. You don't have to be come an ER doctor. Just knowing some basics can maybe help get you or a friend back to civilization and real help. I've got two small first aid kits, one in the bike and one in my back pack. And I've used them, ON MYSELF.

As for being a mechanic, well, it's the same thing. Learning some basics of bike maintenance can help when in the outback and something goes awry. Will you be able to fix anything and everything out there, probably not but, ya never know.
Scott
 
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