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The best way to solve all these problems is to just ride by yourself, old numero uno. But no man is an island, and group rides are their own special kind of fun. At MO, we definitely do our fair share of group rides. Here’s what we’ve learned about the things most likely to go wrong, and what you can do to ward them off ahead of time.
Read more about the Top 10 Things That Go Wrong On Group Rides at Motorcycle.com.
 

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One thing that will go wrong for sure is to transform a group ride into a race.
Sooner or later some one is going to get hurt. That is a fact!!
How to avoid this to happen?
You got to have rules and make every member of the group respect them, other wise will be kicked out of the group.
Is that simple.
My two cents!!!
 

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I'd say there's always a potential problem with communication. I've personally never used electronic comms while riding, but have been on rides where they are used effectively. The other option is non-verbal comms. I've been confused by some hand signals in the past, but somehow seem to have avoided major mishaps. I think that having a ride leader helps most. I just follow the guy in front of me.
 

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Chain. Always check your chain before any trip and if there is a problem with it, don't change it, replace ir. There is not much ti think about!!!!! Just di it!!!!
 

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One group I do rides with has everybody ride the same route but everybody does it at their own pace. The fast guys ride with the fast guys, semi-fast and so on. We all stop for lunch plus everybody stops for gas, bathroom etc.. You can hang with the racers for a bit and drop out whenever. It works good for us.
 

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One group I do rides with has everybody ride the same route but everybody does it at their own pace. The fast guys ride with the fast guys, semi-fast and so on. We all stop for lunch plus everybody stops for gas, bathroom etc.. You can hang with the racers for a bit and drop out whenever. It works good for us.
Similar experience Mike: at Skunk Works (SW), a group of like-minded people from Plant 10 would rally up once a week and ride the fantastic mountain roads from Palmdale, CA up to Newcomb's Ranch in the San Gregorio mountains for dinner. Bikes spanned the spectrum from highly modified crotch rockets to an honest-to-gawd Harley Police Cruiser. Just like special stages in rally racing, the fast folks took off first and the Police Cruiser and other Harleys usually brought up the rear. I would ride behind the fast guys trying to keep up with them on my FJR. They were my target. We had a couple of actual racing riders too. They would disappear into the twisties after just a handful of turns. Things got a little better after I dropped $2,200 on some suspension upgrades but the Feejer is a big bike. These riders would still get to Newcomb's almost a full beer ahead of the rest of us.


At Newcomb's, we would shoot the sheet, discuss how the SW was changing (usually for the worse), have a burger or dog and a beer or two then go our separate ways home. Because this was SoCal, we rarely got weathered out. As I write this I remember these rides with some real nostalgia.
 

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The group I normally ride with are friends. In the past it was mostly Norton owners. Occasionally up to 10 or 12 riders. Numbers have dwindled over the years. Now it is normally 2-5 riders. More than six riders is difficult to keep together on the road. Lately I seem to have inherited lead position but that switches back and forth depending on who is most familiar with the area we are riding through. I sill prefer tail end Charlie. Riding skills and styles are similar. More importantly we are all familiar with the others' riding habits. I find it is best with an odd number of riders where lane protection is involved. We meet at a prearranged location for a coffee or other beverage. There are fuel pumps and washrooms on site meaning everyone starts with a full tank and an empty bladder. Direction and destination for the ride are chosen at that point. Destination is normally a restaurant where we can get an inexpensive late breakfast. Side trips and detours to points of interest along the way are not uncommon. Route home will be together with riders breaking off as they get closer to home. We haven't started riding regularly yet due to COVID restrictions. No restaurants open for sit down breakfasts, and those that allow take out don't allow access to the washrooms. Seeing as guys our age can only rent beverages instead of buying them, options are a bit restricted. Right now when I get dressed to ride the old slogan "All dressed up and nowhere to go" comes to mind. Now that the weather is finally good maybe we will skip breakfast for a few weeks while cutting the ride a bit shorter for the call of Nature if needed.
 
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