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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just did my 600 mile oil change on my 2017 DCT. I was surprised to see a torque listed for the oil filter because I haven't seen that before on motorcycles or cars I've serviced. I've always just put it on at tight as I can by hand.

What are other people doing? And if you're tightening it to the specified torque, are you using the Honda oil filter wrench (7HAA-PJ70101)?

Also, the oil filter I removed was dented and scraped up and I'm pretty sure I didn't do it because my filter wrench has red plastic grips to prevent damage. And I didn't notice any crushing when I removed it.

Finally, the mating surface where the oil filter goes is damaged around the outside (it's rough to the touch and you can see the damage). However, the inside is nice and smooth and I think that's where the oil filter ring fits up to the surface. I took a short test ride and haven't seen any oil leaking so it looks like a good seal. Should I be concerned?
 

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\I've always just put it on at tight as I can by hand.

What are other people doing?
As tight as I can by hand, I seriously doubt that this bike would be different to any other bike or car in this respect. I'm not obsessive about using a torque wrench for everything, so far the only thing I've used a torque wrench for is tightening up the axle nuts after putting the wheels back on (the bike shop mounted my E07 rear and TKC80 front tyres for me).
 

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I have just done the 600 mile oil change on my ATAS. I have 3 torque wrenches that cover all possible torques. The handbook torque for the filter I think was 26nm. I used a torque wrench and I probably tightened it a lot more than I would have done by hand. I understand that the manufacturer has to give a torque value but I believe that a person experienced in spannering has a natural feel for what is right. The amount of stretch applied to a fastener for a given torque varies massively depending on thread condition, thread lubrication and mating faces lubrication.
Generally torque rises as the thread dia increases. Unfortunately on some Honda fasteners they use mushroom headed hex cap screws. The torque quoted may be OK for the thread but the mushroom head (in my opinion) is not capable of taking that torque. The depth of engagement is small and you can see the hex deform as the drive is via the six points on the hex, unlike Torx that have a better engagement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I found the oil filter wrench below at Pep Boys that fits the OEM oil filter.

I put it on the oil filter that I had tightened by hand and when I torqued it to the specified amount (19 ft-lbs or 26 N-m), it turned about 10 degrees more. So I guess my hand-tight wasn't quite enough.

Hopefully I'm all set for the next 8,000 miles. (I was changing the oil on my 2005 VStrom every 3500 miles--one more reason I love the AT.)
 

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Heres another thing I have found with torque wrenches. To get the right torque you need to be rotating when it clicks. For instance say you are tightening and you get to 80% torque but stop rotating as you need to adjust the position. When you re start torqueing its likely the wrench will click off without actually turning the nut. Its as though the torque required to start rotation needs to be higher. So to avoid this I make sure I have enough room to keep rotating as I approach tightness. Hope that makes sense.
For the last 50 years I have hand tightened oil filters and never had one leak. If there is oil on the seal and your hands and filter are dry you can apply considerable torque (unless you are mister sand in face)
 

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I don't think it is a bad practice to use a torque wrench on a motorcycle oil filter and I wouldn't consider it obsessive. I certainly trust the Honda Engineers to get it right and the consequences of a loose filter letting oil out on a motorcycle are more dire, especially on the street, once the oil gets on your rear tire. I have never done a track day but don't you have to safety wire your oil filter to do track days? I certainly use a torque wrench to install the oil filter on my airplane per the MFR recommended torque value, yes they say to torque it (and safety wire it), because the consequences can be great if it comes loose.

All that being said, to each his own on how they skin this cat.

BigKev, you are correct. Basic physics shows that it takes more force to get an object moving (the higher the friction coefficient the more force required) on a surface than it does to keep it moving once it starts moving. It's why in many industries fasteners are lubricated prior to torquing (to lower the friction coefficient between parts and to get more consistent tension on studs / bolts). I was always taught to spread a bit of the fresh oil on the oil filter gasket before putting the oil filter on for that very reason.
 

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the dealer wants me to bring my at in for the 1st service. i am a professional mechanic, can they really check any thing that i cant do myself? as far as oil filter torque goes once you get a feel for how tight some thing is supposed to be a torque wrench really isnt needed, but when i torque fasteners i always click 3x. remember that if your going to be really concerned with proper torque that you need to warm up your wrench by clicking a few times on a heavier torque, when i check my wrench calibrations on the snap on truck he has an extension welded to the wall and a "cold wrench" will have a different reading. i dont think this would matter for a oil filter, but con rod bolts or internal engine parts deserve more attention
 

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The filter is a spin on spin off straight forward easy install-easy removal. Hand tighten only. If in doubt there’s plenty of videos on the internet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The filter is a spin on spin off straight forward easy install-easy removal. Hand tighten only. If in doubt there’s plenty of videos on the internet.
That's what I've been doing for 25 years on my cars and motorcycles so I was surprised that the AT manual actually specified a torque. But it turns out I had just never looked too closely at the procedure before. My 2000 Honda CRV service manual also specifies a torque, although it's less than on the AT (22 N*m instead of 26 N*m).

I suppose they specify a torque because "hand tighten" is subjective and is dependent on the strength of the person.
 

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I’m doing the first oil change myself. The oil filter On so tight I cannot get it off with any filter wrench that I have. May have to punch a screwdriver through it at last recourse.
Anyone else have this problem?
 

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I’m doing the first oil change myself. The oil filter On so tight I cannot get it off with any filter wrench that I have. May have to punch a screwdriver through it at last recourse.
Anyone else have this problem?
I use a large pair of goose neck pliers to get the filter off so you dont put any sideways pressure on the thread, and the Honda filter tool ($6AU here) to put a new one on, I fugure if they go to the effort of printing the spec on the filter they must feel its important. They allso sell a service box here that includes the oil the filter and two washers below thw cost of those individual items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I’m doing the first oil change myself. The oil filter On so tight I cannot get it off with any filter wrench that I have. May have to punch a screwdriver through it at last recourse.
Anyone else have this problem?
I had to use the filter wrench shown below to get mine off. My factory filter was also dented and the paint scratched significantly. I know it wasn't from my filter wrench because mine has the red plastic grips on the ends. Maybe they have robots putting these things on?



 

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I think TORQUE:26 N·m (2.7 kgf·m, 19 lbf·ft) is pretty much
the filter has a huge rubber surface and it will not come off by it self if you tight it by hand
59381
 

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Spin-on oil filters: I've always spun on by hand until the finger-oiled gasket touches the mating surface, then turn further by one quarter turn. Never had a filter leak ever.
 
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