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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever heard of or used products from Tubliss?

It's an interesting product, kind of a skinny little tube that keeps the tire to the rim, but then there's also a second valve that creates a tubeless effect...

not sure if they're DOT compliant or whatever makes them suitable on the road.

http://tubliss.com/

 

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I've heard that enduro guys are using the tire bladder here in combo with a mousse to keep pressure consistent, suitable from road riding from what I hear.

When the mousse gets hot and starts to melt away you just up the pressure in the bladder to keep things consistent.
 

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I'm pretty sure they're not road legal. Also, seems like a lot of effort to solve a problem that may not even come up. I've only ever had one puncture since I started riding...
 

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Interesting. Either way you'll have to drill a hole in the AT rim to make use of any form of a rim lock.

Personally if I were in a situation that required tyre deflation, such as in a very sandy area, I would firstly not deflate the tyre pressure too low. Secondly, I wouldn't gas it or use sudden bursts of open throttle. I think using a bit of common sense would make a rim lock unnecessary in most situations.
 

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Since I ride my bike on the road and off-road, and over more than 400,000 kilometers I have had less than 10 puncture solved by changing the chamber . Replacing the tube is part of the biker life, especially of those who make offroad. Personally is not something that worries me. I worry more reliability and some mechanical failure i can not solve when I'm in some remote place. Wen we ride one Africa Twin we only need to worrie were to go and were is the next fuel station .
 

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I've even heard of some dudes carrying zip ties just in case. Ghetto rim lock, strap the tire to the rim. Extreme emergency evidently.
 

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Tu Bliss

There is no way you are ever going to get a mousse and a TuBliss setup in the same tire. A TuBliss setup will run much cooler than a tubed tire and it lets you air up and down just like a tube which is the problem with tubeless tires.
Tubeless tires will puncture less than a tubed one.
If you are riding in gravel or rough ground its a fact of life a tube will get a pinch flat even at 18 PSI. I have had 5 in a single days ride. Never had one since putting in TuBliss.
A mousse will not run on sealed road it will self destruct with heat very quickly, the TuBliss are not DOT in the US but I run them all day on the road here and they run cooler than a standard tube.
So the pros are
1) lets you get a lot more traction by airing down/up the tire
2) Much lighter weight 2 tubes front and rear you are carrying at least 10kg but probably 15kg more than a TuBliss or Tubeless setup
3)They are just as quick to fix a puncture as a tubeless tire with a plug as apposed to 15mins for a tube fix

The cons
1) if you do take a monster hit and badly bend a rim you need to put in a tube so I carry a 21 light tube in case that ever happens that will do front and rear

In AU the TuBliss system is $150 a heavy duty tube all rubber is $25 I have never had a tube outlast a tire, the TuBliss setup looks brand new after 3 sets of tires its a no brainer.
 

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The Tu bliss has not taken so well in south Africa , most of the guys run mousses here on the dirt bikes , ADV bikes we need a higher pressure than the dirt bikes to help prevent impact punctures (heavier bike too ) . The few guys that persevere with the Tu Bliss rave about them , but I do think they need more attention to pressure monitoring than a tube type ?? I would really be worried to go too low on pressure as the concern is getting a rim full of dents that loose the seal and leak . Although the Tu Bliss is going to help prevent these if pumped up to the high pressure needed .
I prefer to use H/D tubes ,carry a light one in your back pack and use tyre sealant (after you have balanced the wheel ). Way less to worry about ??
 

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Sealing Rims

Hi Anotherbiker yes there are a number of solutions that will do that and if you want to run high pressure tubeless tires that might work. I have not got my AT yet so I don't know what the rim's are like if they have a tubeless gutter or not. A tubeless rim needs a gutter in the rim for the bead to sit in and high tire pressure ie 25 to 40PSI to keep it on the rim. A tubed rim typically does not have that gutter so if you run a tubeless tire or even a tubed tire on a sealed rim and you get a pressure drop for any reason the tire may well come off the bead and that will not be good.
A pressure drop in the main tire on a TuBliss system means that the bead is still locked to the rim even without the gutter so the tire will stay on the bead.
That to me is quite a safety feature when converting a rim designed for a tubed tire. Will be interesting to see what the AT design is.
Regards
 

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Thanks SkipD!

I did speak to Woody's about the options, and they basically said the same. It was unlikely that a 21 inch tubed wheel would have a safety bead, so sealing the stock rim probably wouldn't work.

Two things that bother me about the TuBliss system - the obvious being that it isn't approved for road use. The other is that replacing tires is more complicated then for the uninitiated. I plan to travel to far flung places on this bike, and if I need a new tire somewhere in Azerbaijan or Bolivia, is the local motorcycle tire fitter going to understand how to change a tire with a TuBliss system in it? Am I going to be able to explain it with a language barrier?

I suppose though, worst case scenario if the TuBliss system gets screwed up I just have to put a normal tube back in it and we're back to normal though?
 

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REplacing a TuBliss in the wild

I would not let anybody in a tire shop touch a TuBliss setup if you go very remote stick with tubes. The first change with a TuBliss is a bit slower but once you have done it a couple of times it is no different in time to putting in a tube, just a different process. I always change my own tires anyway, its just good practice when you are out on the trail some place. I think the TuBliss setup is much safer for the highway than a tube, they run a lot cooler than a tubed tire and you get the full bead lock.
The main reason you would go TuBliss is to drop the pressure way down and not get pinch flats that you do with a tube.

If you don't need that in your travels I would stick to the tube for very remote out of country travel (you may even be sorting through the tire scrap heap to find old warn tires that have more tread than the set you have on I know that happens here in AU) that's why Honda made that decision I think.
 

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You can not fit the TuBliss setup to the AT

Just got an email back from TuBliss saying that the rim sizing on both the front and back of the AT are two wide for the TuBliss setup.
So its tubes all round.
 

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Thanks Davy - these seem to be a good option for me - keep the tubed ones for any serious off-roading I might do (i.e. when it gets sold...!). Now - which colours for a Tri - same again or do something a bit different? Might be nice to make it a bit different from everyone else's Tri.
 
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