Honda Africa Twin Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of July's Ride of the Month Challenge! Theme: Drop it like it's hot!
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Is it possible? I have seen people claiming both that it is possible, and that is not possible. Has anyone actually tried it?

Where can I buy the rims?

Are there any other manufacturers selling tubeless for the AT besides Alpina and places selling converted rims (Rally Raid, etc.)?

Please don't tell me about how great tubes are and how this bike was meant for dirt thrashing. Please don't try to sell me on tubeless conversion kits. There are plenty of other threads about those things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Bartubeless is an italian company which professionally converts OEM rims to tubeless. They also sell complete wheel set already transformed. They work really well.
Re the 2020 wheels it's not officially supported. It looks like you would need different spacers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bartubless is just another form of tubeless conversion. I am looking for a solution that does not involve tape, rubber, silicone, or whatever to seal the spokes. Looking for a no-maintenance, long-term solution.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,359 Posts
I recall on the Forum (you need to do a search) this type of discussion coming up. Rims can be had (Alpina?), but I recall the cost was quite high? On the order of $2K for the set?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Bartubless is not a conversion. It is a very professional approach to seal spoked rims, far better IMO than the OEM solution of KTM which I have personally seen.

I have them for some months now and they have not lost even one psi. Let alone the superb quality of the rims (Excel) and real stainless spokes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, I have done lots of searching.

I was looking for a solution where the spokes are outside the air chamber, or the rims are cast (not spokes).

Bartubless may be the best of the "spoke sealing" rims, and I may go that route, but I am looking for something else other than just plugging the holes in the rims.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,359 Posts
Bartubless is not a conversion. It is a very professional approach to seal spoked rims, far better IMO than the OEM solution of KTM which I have personally seen.

I have them for some months now and they have not lost even one psi. Let alone the superb quality of the rims (Excel) and real stainless spokes.
This is attractive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Yes, I have done lots of searching.

I was looking for a solution where the spokes are outside the air chamber, or the rims are cast (not spokes).

Bartubless may be the best of the "spoke sealing" rims, and I may go that route, but I am looking for something else other than just plugging the holes in the rims.
This is about the only true exterior spoke, true tubeless rim I've come across while searching. They're about $3,000.00 USD:
 

·
Registered
2016 Honda CRF 1000L Manual
Joined
·
577 Posts
So I guess I gotta ask the big question. Why tubeless over tubed? Especially if you're riding a lot off road? With a tube tire I get the extra protection of the rubber tube wall. I can install a heavy duty tube like this Tuff Tube and get even better protection.


I can also add a Mr. Tuffy-type protector. I can easily patch a tube and resume riding even if I have damaged the tire or the sidewall. And a rolled-up tube is a lot less bulky than a spare tire.

BTW, did you know that an appropriately-folded piece of US currency or two can be used inside a tire to cover over a moderately-sized rock gash in your sidewall and get you back to civilization? The fibers in the bill make it extremely resilient to tearing. Just position it over the gash and inflate the tube and you're back in the race.

Back when I was riding big Yami two strokes in the desert I would up my odds of getting home without incident by riding Tuff Tubes, internal tire protectors and Ride-On sealant goo. I used this recipe after a front tire blowout on some seriously rocky terrain out in the middle of BLM nowhere in the CA desert. A sharp rock pinched my sidewall and I had to replace the tube and cover the gash with 2 $20 bills folded in thirds for 6 plies. That fix worked well enough to get me back to the RV about 20 miles away.

Anyway, I'm just curious about the pros and cons of going tubeless.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ViperTech18

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,359 Posts
Just speaking openly and not for anyone in particular:

Maybe some of it has to do with a sudden blow-out (i.e. tubed), versus a slow and noticeable leak (i.e. tubeless) that can enhance the margin of a safe curb pull-over on, say, highways.

The other obvious one is the convenience of a possible single plug fix to get going quickly.
 

·
Registered
2016 Honda CRF 1000L Manual
Joined
·
577 Posts
Just speaking openly and not for anyone in particular:

Maybe some of it has to do with a sudden blow-out (i.e. tubed), versus a slow and noticeable leak (i.e. tubeless) that can enhance the margin of a safe curb pull-over on, say, highways.

The other obvious one is the convenience of a possible single plug fix to get going quickly.
I agree that the single plug is an advantage if the damage is slight. But do you think the probability of a sudden blow-out is higher tubed vs. untubed, all other things being equal? I'm of the opinion the reverse is true. The tube provides a belt and suspenders kind of protection EXCEPT where the stem is concerned.

Note that I did have a "sudden blow-out" of a tubed front tire on my '78 Gold Wing at 80 mph on the slab somewhere in TN back in the 80's. That was a hair-raising experience; the bike was loaded up for a cross-country trip and the flat made it almost uncontrollable. In this situation the tube failed at the seal between the tube and the fill stem and it went flat in about 2 seconds.

As for myself, I would be loathe to ride offroad long distances from civilization without tubed tires and a spare tube for each wheel. But I'm an old fart and stuck in my ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
I agree that the single plug is an advantage if the damage is slight. But do you think the probability of a sudden blow-out is higher tubed vs. untubed, all other things being equal? I'm of the opinion the reverse is true. The tube provides a belt and suspenders kind of protection EXCEPT where the stem is concerned.

Note that I did have a "sudden blow-out" of a tubed front tire on my '78 Gold Wing at 80 mph on the slab somewhere in TN back in the 80's. That was a hair-raising experience; the bike was loaded up for a cross-country trip and the flat made it almost uncontrollable. In this situation the tube failed at the seal between the tube and the fill stem and it went flat in about 2 seconds.

As for myself, I would be loathe to ride offroad long distances from civilization without tubed tires and a spare tube for each wheel. But I'm an old fart and stuck in my ways.
the initiator of the thread writes :

"Please don't tell me about how great tubes are and how this bike was meant for dirt thrashing "

meaning that either dirt is not in his interests or he appreciates the advantages of the Tubeless more than the possible disadvantages.

It is all a matter of choice and priorities.

For me, doing zero dirt, the only concern with my bike was the tubed rims. I was constantly riding in anxiety that a sudden blow-out would possibly kill me and my wife. So, when I decided that my 2018 ATAS was a keeper, I immediately ordered the BARTUBLESS wheel set and since then I ride with peace of mind.

Of course you may have a sudden blow out on a tubeless; but this in real life and assuming that your tires are not rubbish for any reason (ie. I know riders that keep their freaking tires for 5 years and then complain that they dismantle) , it is highly unlike to happen. (I repeat, I do NOT do dirt at all).

A tubed tire on the other hand, is more likely to rapidly deflate even if pierced by a nail, without necessarily torn apart.

Finally, changing tubes on the side of the road, is definitely not in my strong point as a rider and frankly, I do not want either to learn or carry tubes and tools for that. I want to be able to plug in a plug, inflate with a couple of CO2 cartridges and be on the bike again in 10-15 minutes.

:):):)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I was wondering if all the spokes from one side of the hub (on 2020 ATAS) go to the opposite side on the rim. Can any owner confirm? If not then the spokes will foul the brake calipers on earlier models. Wouldn't it be great if the rim on its own could be switched! I prefer the spokes on the outside of the rim approach to that of the Kineo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Is it possible? I have seen people claiming both that it is possible, and that is not possible. Has anyone actually tried it?

Where can I buy the rims?

Are there any other manufacturers selling tubeless for the AT besides Alpina and places selling converted rims (Rally Raid, etc.)?

Please don't tell me about how great tubes are and how this bike was meant for dirt thrashing. Please don't try to sell me on tubeless conversion kits. There are plenty of other threads about those things.
hi, so have you found out if the tubeless wheels of a 2020 ATAS fits older ATs?
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top