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Discussion Starter #42
Fire up, can u post a pic of ur garages from the front would love to see them


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It's the newest one on the block. :ROFLMAO:
Scott



Image result for rundown shack
 
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It's the newest one on the block. :ROFLMAO:
Scott



Image result for rundown shack
I appreciate old (abandoned) homes, especially in the deep south since many tell a significant story. The history can be important, and many times sad. Like a rusty and non-functioning motorcycle, a house of the same was once somebody's home.

But in Dearborn, MI there seemed to be so many stories. Some communities it seemed like every third house. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I appreciate old (abandoned) homes, especially in the deep south since many tell a significant story. The history can be important, and many times sad. Like a rusty and non-functioning motorcycle, a house of the same was once somebody's home.

But in Dearborn, MI there seemed to be so many stories. Some communities it seemed like every third house. :(
DT,
What you say is quite true. There are lots of stories and plenty of history in those old dwellings. However, like all aspects, there's another side of the coin. There's the LAZY side of the human race. There's the NO PRIDE side, the no COMMON DECENCY side and more. Take for instance our old neighborhood in So Cal. It's a cul-de-sac of 14 homes. When we moved in, approximately 26 years ago, the homes were around 4 years old. Another words, it was, at that time, a new neighborhood. The people living in those homes, all continuously showed a sense of pride, a sense of belonging.

But, as time went on, about 11 of the original 14 families moved on. And, what replaced them was, well, for the most part, dare I say it, Wh... Tra…

It wasn't long and, what used to be nice looking, well kept yards, were dead. Nice looking 3-rail fences were broken, rotted, falling down and trees were overgrown and or dead. Then came the broken down cars, broken and ugly old, flat tired motorhomes sitting in the front yards and more and more and more. There was at least two residences that had more than one family living in them with multiple cars all stacked in the dead front yards, driveways, street, overflowing into other peoples parking areas etc.

After right at 20 years of keeping our place as neat and nice as I could, I finally told the CEO, if we're not out of here IMMEDIATELY, I'm gonna go Postal (old term used by us old guys that remember one of the first mass shootings by a postal worker).

Ok, enough blabbing. We moved, bought a brand new home in AZ and, have been considerably happier ever since.

Yes, there's history in most of Americas neighborhoods but, not all of it is good. Much of it is sad.
Scott
 
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DT,
What you say is quite true. There are lots of stories and plenty of history in those old dwellings. However, like all aspects, there's another side of the coin. There's the LAZY side of the human race. There's the NO PRIDE side, the no COMMON DECENCY side and more. Take for instance our old neighborhood in So Cal. It's a cul-de-sac of 14 homes. When we moved in, approximately 26 years ago, the homes were around 4 years old. Another words, it was, at that time, a new neighborhood. The people living in those homes, all continuously showed a sense of pride, a sense of belonging.

But, as time went on, about 11 of the original 14 families moved on. And, what replaced them was, well, for the most part, dare I say it, Wh... Tra…

It wasn't long and, what used to be nice looking, well kept yards, were dead. Nice looking 3-rail fences were broken, rotted, falling down and trees were overgrown and or dead. Then came the broken down cars, broken and ugly old, flat tired motorhomes sitting in the front yards and more and more and more. There was at least two residences that had more than one family living in them with multiple cars all stacked in the dead front yards, driveways, street, overflowing into other peoples parking areas etc.

After right at 20 years of keeping our place as neat and nice as I could, I finally told the CEO, if we're not out of here IMMEDIATELY, I'm gonna go Postal (old term used by us old guys that remember one of the first mass shootings by a postal worker).

Ok, enough blabbing. We moved, bought a brand new home in AZ and, have been considerably happier ever since.

Yes, there's history in most of Americas neighborhoods but, not all of it is good. Much of it is sad.
Scott
Yes, of course. Didn't mean to generalize. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Yes, of course. Didn't mean to generalize. (y)
There is/was nothing wrong with your replay. It was/is quite true and honest. It's just that, humanoids are a funny species. There are some that care about their being, as in how they look, what their surroundings look like, and how they present themselves. Then, there's the ones that could give a rats....a... about any of that. We are in Bayview CO at present and, I'm running the A/T all over the place on many, many miles of county roads etc. It seems that, in this neck of the woods, by far, the majority of residents of this area DO CARE about how they live etc.

Yes, there's the old, leaning, decaying barns etc. Ya just wonder, who built those, when, what was their living back then, (most likely farming).

Aaaaaannnny way, getting a bit off topic here. So far, no mishaps with the big girl. She didn't decide to nap on me at any given time. Lot's of gravel-type roads here. I sloooooooooww Waaaaaay down for even some slight curves in these roads. I'm what's called gun shy now that I've dumped it ONE TIME in a strange predicament. And those 90/10 tires don't help things either.
Scott
 
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... So far, no mishaps with the big girl. She didn't decide to nap on me at any given time. Lot's of gravel-type roads here. I sloooooooooww Waaaaaay down for even some slight curves in these roads. I'm what's called gun shy now that I've dumped it ONE TIME in a strange predicament. And those 90/10 tires don't help things either.
Scott
RE Dirt roads and 90/10 tires: Do continue to be careful.
 

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Scott,

Great pitcures enjoy it here in Europe is nearly impossible to drive and park with such a combination. Everything here is based on max 8 meter and parking somewhere in nature is almost everywhere forbidden.
 

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Well Gang,
We just got back home here to Lake Havasu City AZ from an 1,150 mile trip through AZ, NM and CO. And the A/T rode on the back of the motorhome very nicely for the whole distance and never moved an inch. I rode quite a few little trips in all the stops and it was a blast. The bike (any motorcycle) that carried on the back of a motorhome, especially a diesel coach with a rear radiator, gets horribly dirty, depending on road conditions. So, in some cases, I needed to clean it BEFORE I could go out and get it dirty.

But, I'm getting a bit more at ease with it in the off road scenarios. That doesn't mean I get overzealous or in any way, over confident, not at all. It simply means I'm just getting a tad more comfortable in anything less than pavement. I still have to change those tires though. 90/10 tires are great for the street but, don't instill much confidence once the tires leave the pavement. Anyway, as much as I'm totally happy with the DCT functions and, its rider adjustability, even on the fly, I found myself using the MANUAL mode on more than one occasion.

In rare circumstances, I found it was just nicer and more applicable to be able to CHOOSE which gear I'm in and for what length of time, before either up or down shifting. I only used the manual mode a couple of times but, again, it was just one of those things where it seemed to make things better for the application(s). So far, in the time I've owned this bike, I can't say there's any times I've disliked it or, felt unhappy in any sort of way. It's a bit on the heavy side for manipulation in rutty or rocky or anything uglier than a flat, forest service road, at least in my opinion. But, it's still a ton of fun.
Scott
 

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Well Gang,
We just got back home here to Lake Havasu City AZ from an 1,150 mile trip through AZ, NM and CO. And the A/T rode on the back of the motorhome very nicely for the whole distance and never moved an inch. I rode quite a few little trips in all the stops and it was a blast. The bike (any motorcycle) that carried on the back of a motorhome, especially a diesel coach with a rear radiator, gets horribly dirty, depending on road conditions. So, in some cases, I needed to clean it BEFORE I could go out and get it dirty.

But, I'm getting a bit more at ease with it in the off road scenarios. That doesn't mean I get overzealous or in any way, over confident, not at all. It simply means I'm just getting a tad more comfortable in anything less than pavement. I still have to change those tires though. 90/10 tires are great for the street but, don't instill much confidence once the tires leave the pavement. Anyway, as much as I'm totally happy with the DCT functions and, its rider adjustability, even on the fly, I found myself using the MANUAL mode on more than one occasion.

In rare circumstances, I found it was just nicer and more applicable to be able to CHOOSE which gear I'm in and for what length of time, before either up or down shifting. I only used the manual mode a couple of times but, again, it was just one of those things where it seemed to make things better for the application(s). So far, in the time I've owned this bike, I can't say there's any times I've disliked it or, felt unhappy in any sort of way. It's a bit on the heavy side for manipulation in rutty or rocky or anything uglier than a flat, forest service road, at least in my opinion. But, it's still a ton of fun.
Scott
Awesome Scott.

Watch for rocks.
 

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That's awesome!
Every review of the DCT I've seen, backs up what you are saying.
Besides, who wouldn't want to "paddle shift" especially with the engine rev-match programming. :)

Just a thought for slow speed manipulation. When I was racing dirt bikes, one of the things I'd practice is how slow I could go, and how far over I could lean the bike at either a standstill, or super slow, without touching the ground. Most of the times it became war with my practice buddies to see who could do it the best. Until it got to be we could do it so long that the ice in the cooler would melt, and the beer would get warm... lol

Anyway, I was surfing YouTube last night, and saw a video of a guy basically saying to practice the same thing on an ADV bike. The video was more related to figure 8s in a parking lot, but same principles at work.
He also mentioned about riding the rear brake against the clutch to keep things smooth. This is something I learned early on with slow maneuvers on my dirt bikes. It also works great on fast rough downhills to load the rear suspension.
It got me thinking that this may be a good way to keep the DCT engaged at ultra low speeds.
Done right, it's almost like riding with a direct drive electric motor.

Glad to read you are out having a blast!
 

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Hey gang,
Thanks for the nice and encouraging comments. The very first thing I have to admit/state/proclaim, whatever you want to label it here is, I'm 67 years old, and my reaction skills are most certainly not those of a 20 year old motocross/trials rider. I have to keep in mind, I want the remaining active brain cells there aren't many left, to be kept intact. So, I ride like a little old lady off road. Especially with a 540 lb., top-heavy, non-dirt tired motorcycle. But, again, this is a ton of fun.

The pics below show the marvelous A/T posing on a rather fun dirt road and, in front of many little watering holes/ponds/ tanks as they're called in some parts of the country. For the most part, that was a really fun road to ride on in or around Williams AZ. Every once in a while, RARELY, I'd twist that throttle ever so slightly and edge the bike to around 35-40 mph. Then, I'd feel the front wheel start to drift side-to-side when I'd all of a sudden be riding on a short peak of built up gravel. Whooooooaaa big girl, slow down and get off this stuff, back to 25 or so mph.

Sheath,
When I had my '08 GL 1800 Goldwing, I did, on occasion, practice some slow speed extreme cornering handling. It was not fun in my opinion. But, I've done quite a bit of it with the A/T. As I stated in one of my other threads/posts, I can now go from one parking spot in a parking lot, to the very next one, both right and left turning, very slowly, without putting any feet down. For me, that's a tremendous improvement. As long as I've been on two wheels, which hovers around 55 years or so, I've never really done what's called close quarter drill (old military term). But, even the slight amount I've drastically improved on, has came in handy quite a few times in real life on the A/T.
Scott
 

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