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I installed a 41 sprocket on my 1000 manual last thursday, dropping a tooth and gearing up a tad. Slightly more relaxed at 110-120 kph.
I know the engine is infinitely flexible but it sorta suits the 60 & 80 kph zones better. (4th & 5th) Without changing up and lugging.
I rarely venture off road and at idle the speed diff is sweet FA.
Haven't checked with my gps but i think now the speedo reading is more accurate.
Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Tire Motor vehicle

It feels good for now!
 

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Well, after 18,590 miles with some hard core off road riding it was time to change the drive chain and the front sprocket. It took about 2.5 hrs and was involved, but not complicated. The old chain had started to make some crunching noises during 1st-gear take offs and accelerations, indicating it was chewing itself up internally. Time to go.
I did not replace the rear sprocket because it only has 5,300 miles on it and is still in good shape although it is beginning to show some wear.
I started by ordering the necessary parts. The chain, a 124-link DID 525 VX3 was ordered from Sprocket Center with a rivet-type master link for $139.50 delivered. The drive sprocket was a 16T OEM replacement from Revzilla for $41.89, Honda Part # 23801-MEE-D00. Total cash expended was $181.39.
Ready to go on the bike.
Once both had arrived, I started: I unbolted the lower shift lever and moved it out of the way so I could get to the aftermarket sprocket cover for removal. Here's what the area looked like with the cover removed:
The area was filled with caked-on crud that I used a Grunge Brush and some judiciously applied brake cleaner to knock off. I now loosened the rear axle and reduced the tension bolts to put slack into the chain. I then put the bike in first gear and took it from the centerstand to the kickstand so the rear tire was on the ground. This allowed me to break the bolt holding the drive sprocket at about 60 ft-lbf. This bolt is a standard right-hand thread. I was interested to note that there was ZERO play in this sprocket around the countershaft either in rotation or left-right play. The tolerances were what you would expect from a quality build.
The sprocket now slid off the countershaft without a fight. Comparing the old with the new, it's easy to see the time had come to replace it. In the pic below, the old is on the right and the direction of rotation is anti-clockwise. Notice the thining, stretching and shape of the teeth compared to the replacement.
There was evidence of rust in the splines of both the sprocket and the countershaft:
I put a thin coating of moly grease on both mating parts and installed the new sprocket. I lightly tightened the locking bolt to hold the sprocket in place. Now for the chain.
I broke the old chain using a Motion Pro PBR tool. This thing is built like a tank. It had NO problem digesting this old chain. Just follow the included instructions. I've read where some users have complained that the silver knock out pin has broken trying to push a link pin out. I could only see this occur if the user did not have everything lined up precisely. This thing made short & easy work of this job.With the new sprocket and chain on the bike it was necessary to press the master link into place before riveting it with the MP tool. Lubricate the o-rings, install them and press on the master link plate then we reconfigure the MP tool for riveting. The round head in the picture above was used to expand the dimples on the master link provided. Riveting these two pins took some serious torque. I stopped a couple of times and removed the tool to check the expansion with a mic. Then tension the chain to spec and torque the sprocket bolt to 40 ft-lbf with a dab of blue Locktite. Once in place I could stand back to admire the work:
And since Ol' Red was cooperative throughout the whole affair, I rewarded her with another piece of red bling, an anodized aluminum sprocket cover from MMG Parts in Japan.
A quick test ride saw no noise coming from the new chain. This was a definite improvement over the condition the old chain had gotten to.
So we're ready to go for the next 18,000 miles. Wish us luck!
Hey WeeWilly, Do you have a link for that sprocket cover?. Ive noticed your red bling in the passed (y) (y) nice
 
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Picked up the rack I ordered when I ordered the bike back in June, also the accessory socket was in.
Took about an hour to fit, lighting isn't great so I just took my time.
LED work light ran out of battery before I could fit the accessory socket but in no rush for that now I have the Orca phone holder/charger wired up anyway.
Great addition, I couldn't do without mine. So much easier to man handle.
Never understood why its not still standard issue on newer models, $$ i guess.
It took honda 5 months to get me a set of pannier rubbers, so no surprises there either.

Nice (y)
 
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